Finding pictures the legal way 3/3

By Jun.26, 2017

Welcome to the third in this series on searching for images the legal way. If you missed them, check out part one (using Google image search and Microsoft to find legal images), and part two (safe picture search engines).

Today we’re meeting (possibly) the best colour search engine in the world, also known as the Multicolr Search Engine from TinEye Labs. Use it to search for pictures by colour. This is a fantastic tool, especially if you’re trying to build a colour scheme for a visual piece of work. All the images have a creative commons licence, which means they are going to be fine to reuse in your academic and professional work.

  • Step 1: Select up to five colours
  • Step 2: Adjust the proportion of the colours, if you wish
  • Step 3: Add tags to refine your search. Here I’ve used ‘garden’
  • Enjoy the results. These pictures are OK for you to download and use.

But the TinEye Labs goodness doesn’t stop there. Its second tool to try is the colour extraction tool.

This allows you to take the colours from an image and use them in any way you choose – it would work well if you want to create a colour scheme for an academic poster from an existing picture.

 
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Searching for pictures the legal way 2/3

By Jun.23, 2017

Welcome to part two of this series on searching for pictures the legal way. If you missed part one, it’s here. If you know how to do a Google search for an image that’s ‘licenced for reuse’ you’ve made a good start. But sometimes the results from Google alone can be disappointing.

Fortunately, there are many other search engines that are dedicated to finding free-to-use images that are licenced for reuse. My favourite is Pixabay – because it’s powerful and intuitive to use. But there are many others which are worth a try:

Openphoto

Morguefile

Unsplash

Pexels

Creative Commons Search

Flickr Creative Commons

Photopin

Next time: Meet (possibly) the best colour search engine of them all

 
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World Giraffe Day

By Jun.21, 2017

Today is World Giraffe Day, an annual event supported by the Giraffe Conservation Foundation to celebrate the longest-necked animal in the world on the longest day of the year (or longest night if you happen to be on the other side of the planet).

giraffe

Not only is 21st June the longest day, it is also the First Day of Summer – and this means that the Summer Wordscope workshops are about to begin. This is a great opportunity to improve your academic writing skills – becoming a conscious, coherent and skilled writer will increase your chances of a higher class degree – and help you with your career after graduation.

Learn more about Summer Wordscope here.

Go on, stick your neck out!

 
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Finding pictures the legal way (1/3)

By Jun.21, 2017

When you’re looking for pictures to illustrate or enhance your academic work, how do you search? Do you ‘copy and paste’ from the internet, as a student recently told me? Or simply type your search term in that old reliable, Google?

Unless you’re careful, searching like this can contravene copyright law and potentially get you into legal trouble. Whenever you find an image through a regular Google search, there’s a good chance that it either:

  • has a license which forbids you to use it, or
  • has no license at all

Assuming that you didn’t ask for prior permission to use the content, it’s illegal to use it if either of these two cases applies.

Fortunately, there are various ways to search for images that are OK to use in your academic work, for presentations and in your professional life. Here are the two simplest ones.

  1. If you want to use Google, here’s how to search for pictures on Google the legal way:
  • Go to Google and type in your search term.
  • Do an image search.
  • Click Tools
  • Click Usage Rights
  • Select ‘licenced for reuse’
  • All the pictures that display are fine for you to use.

2) Another option is to use the inbuilt creative commons image search within Microsoft Word and PowerPoint (in versions 2013 and 2016). From within your document, go to the ‘Insert’ menu on the ribbon and select ‘Online Pictures’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will take you to a Bing search engine which will return Creative Commons (ie safe to use) images for you.

Sometimes, the results from Google and Microsoft alone may be disappointing. Next time: some alternative safe search engines for pictures that will give you brilliant results.

 
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Wordscope workshop places now available!

By Jun.19, 2017

Tracy Breheny

Tracy tells you how to book onto a Wordscope workshop.

Now all of the exams and essays for the second Semester are complete, some of you will be looking forward to a productive summer of reading and preparation for the next semester, and so a constructive and dedicated Academic Writing programme may be just what you need in order to keep you focussed. Or, it could be that you have re-submissions due in the next few weeks for Semester one and/or two and you could do with extra help at both an instructive and personal tutor level. Either way, from now on your marks will be weighted significantly towards your degree class, so it is with this in mind that Dr Carson Bergstrom has developed a short course of Academic Writing Skills.

Based on the “Wordscope” format, the course will be an intense and shortened version of the original, delivered in a series of six workshops. The skills and strategies covered will not only enhance the way that you write but also the way that you organise and structure your thoughts, ideas, and research. Evidence from the “Wordscope programme indicates that if you attend six workshops, you should improve your grades by at least six marks. It is not rocket science: becoming a conscious, coherent, and skilled writer will increase your chances of a higher degree class.

So, what are you waiting for? The schedule of classes can be found here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/wordscope/home/workshop-timetable-and-how-to-attend. Once you decide which group suits, please click on the relevant ‘Click to register‘ link, which will book your place via Advantage. Places are limited, so register your interest before it is too late!

For further information about Wordscope, please see the webpage here: www.salford.ac.uk/wordscope.  If you have any further questions about Wordscope, you can contact them directly at: wordscope@salford.ac.uk.

 

 
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Explore ESDU

By Jun.15, 2017

Need engineering design methods and data? Anne shows you where you can find these.

Do you need access to design methods and data for aeronautical, mechanical or structural engineering?

 

little logoESDU (Engineering Sciences Data Unit) provides data, software tools and design methods that have been monitored, guided and rigorously tested and validated by technical committees comprised of leading experts from industry, academia and government organisations from around the world.

In short, this is information you can trust.

 

What’s more, you won’t find this information on Google or Wikipedia – in in many cases the data and information is unpublished and only available through ESDU.

When you are designing or building something, you don’t want it to fall apart, do you?

 

Access ESDU through Library Search.

Go to sign in if you are working off-campus.
ESDU2

When ESDU opens read the Agreement and click the Yes, I accept… button.

Not sure where to start?

ESDU5

ESDU4

Once you are familiar with the types of information you can find on ESDU, try using the Search box to find the things you need.

 
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How to find construction contracts

By Jun.12, 2017

Tracy Breheny

Tracy explains how to locate various construction contracts you may need for your studies.

When undertaking your studies you may find you need to access a number of different contracts.  These contracts can be tricky to find as they are often  located in various places.  We have access to various construction contracts through Library Search. Library Search can be found here:  https://sal-primo-production.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo-explore/search?vid=SAL_MAIN&lang=en_US&sortby=rank. It is always worth signing in to Library Search as soon as you access it for ease of use off-campus.

We have pulled together a list of construction contracts that you might need to be able to find, with guidance on how to locate them:

 

NEC contracts

We have a collection of NEC contracts available through Library Search.  To access these:

  1. Go to Library Search.
  2. Sign yourself into Library Search by clicking on Sign-in (top right-hand corner of the Library Search homepage) and then enter your network username and password.
  3. Type NEC in Academia into the main Library Search box.
  4. Follow the link and you will be promted to log in with your network username and password.  You will then have access to all of the NEC contracts and documents, which can be read online and/or downloaded.

JCT contracts

JCT contracts are available through our Construction Information Service database.  To access these:

  1. Go to Library Search.
  2. Sign yourself into Library Search by clicking on Sign-in (top right-hand corner of the Library Search homepage) and then enter your network username and password.
  3. Type Construction Information Service into the Library Search box.
  4. Click on the link and select  Construction Information Service – CIS from the list of databases given.  Because you have already logged into Library Search, this should allow you access to all of the content we subscribe to.  You will then have access to all of the JCT contracts and documents, which can be read online and/or downloaded.
  5. When searching for a specific JCT contract it helps to include the year, for example JCT contract 2016

FIDIC contracts

We  have access to the FIDIC contract suite, is also contained in the Construction Information Service database.  To access FIDIC contracts:

  1. Go to Library Search.
  2. Sign yourself into Library Search by clicking on Sign-in (top right-hand corner of the Library Search homepage) and then enter your network username and password.
  3. Type Construction Information Service into the Library Search box.
  4. Click on the link and select  Construction Information Service – CIS from the list of databases given.  Because you have already logged into Library Search, this should allow you access to all of the content we subscribe to.  You will then have access to all of the FIDIC contracts and documents, which can be read online and/or downloaded.

 

A really useful, key construction-related database you may also want to access is  Construction Information Service.

Construction Information Service is really useful database which holds a variety of UK construction industry-based resources.  This database contains a variety of information ranging from contracts to building regulations.  It can be accessed through Library Search (you will need to sign into it with your network username and password if you are off-campus, as detailed above).  This database is definitely worth a look if you are interested in construction, building surveying, quantity surveying, civil engineering and architecture.

 

If you have any questions about construction contracts, please contact your Academic Support Librarian for further help: http://blogs.salford.ac.uk/digital-literacy-skills/subject-support/

 
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Welcome to all new students!

By Jun.12, 2017

 

Tracy Breheny

Tracy talks about how you can get ahead as a new student.

 

Welcome to all new starters this month!

 

Being a new student can be a little overwhelming at first, with you being given lots of information and meeting lots of new people.  To make things a little easier, we have put together two information packages as part of our Skills for Learning programme that we hope you will find useful.

 

 

There is a Get Going package which you will have been sent prior to the start of your course.  This package contains really useful information on getting started at University and where you can get help with things, should you need it.  It helps you develop your academic learning skills to become an independent learner.

 

If you haven’t taken a look at this yet, you can access it here:  http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/get-going/get-going

 

Following on from Get Going, we have Get Ahead, which is a package deisgned to help you discover computing, library, research and study essentials for getting ahead in your studies.  If you haven’t taken a look at this yet, you can access it here:  http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/get-going/library.

 

There are also lots of workshops and library tours running for new students; find out about them and book on here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/get-going

 

Both of these packages, plus lots more information and library, research, study and digital skills support can be found on our Skills for Learning webpage here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning.  You may also find it useful to see what other students thought about starting here at Salford by visiting our Student Diaries page: http://blogs.salford.ac.uk/digital-literacy-skills/new-salford-not-alone-studentdiaries/ 

 

You may find it useful to keep up-to-date with things by:

 

Welcome to the University of Salford and good luck with your course!

 

 

 

 

 
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Studying Theatre or Dance? – Check out Alexander Street Video

By May.30, 2017

 

Alexander Street Video provides recordings of classic performances, as well as documentary information on all sorts of related topics.  You will find material on the history of theatre, playwrights, actors, directors, choreographers, theatre and dance companies, production staging & design, and performance methods and styles.

To get access, go via Library Search (Sign-in with your University username and password, search for Alexander Street Video and click on the link for online access).

The Disciplines tab will allow you to select Music & Performing Arts and from there you can explore videos on Theatre and Dance.

 

 

 
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Looking for dissertations and theses? Library Search can help.

By May.29, 2017

Tracy Breheny

Tracy talks you through finding and accessing dissertations and theses.

During the course of your studies, you may find that you need to look for dissertations or theses.  Maybe you would like to see what other research has been undertaken in relation to your topic, or perhaps you would like to see what a dissertation or thesis looks like.

You can use Library Search to help you find them and there are a number of different ways to search depending on what you want.

Finding University of Salford dissertations and theses

You can use the ‘Advanced Search’ option in Library Search to find the dissertations and theses by previous University of Salford students.

To find out how to do this, take a look here: http://salford.libanswers.com/faq/94021

Using databases to find other dissertations and theses

There are a number of databases you can use to find dissertations and theses from other academic insitutions.  You can access these through Library Search.

To find out how to do this, take a look here: http://salford.libanswers.com/e-resources/faq/137926

 

Helpful tips when looking for dissertations and theses:

  • Select a couple of keywords and use these when searching.  Don’t try to enter too many keywords all at once as it’s often useful to see what else there is around your topic.  Also, entering too many keywords can make your search too specific and you may struggle to fnd what you need.
  • Can’t find what you need? Many databases only contain PhD level manuscripts.  Using advanced search options within certain databases can sometimes allow you to specify other manuscript levels.
  • Don’t worry about topic area too much if you just want to see what one looks like.  Looking at any of them should give you an idea of layout and format.  Always check any guidelines you have been given by your school.

 

 

Writing a dissertation ?  Need further help?

There is lots of help available for students writing or preparing to write a dissertation.  Check out our Skills for Learning webpage here for further support:   http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/reading-and-writing.

 

 
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