Vogue Italia archive – brilliant new Fashion resource

By Aug.14, 2017

Yet another brilliant new resource for Art & Design! Our new Fashion resource, Vogue Italia archive, neatly complements our existing online access to Vogue US. Vogue Italia archive consists of scanned articles from the journal’s launch in 1964 onwards, and so is excellent for illustrations, retro interest in Fashion and the historical development of garments. Use the keyword feature to search for garments, designers etc.

To access it – from Library Search choose Databases, then choose Vogue Italia from the A-Z list. Network username and password are required off-campus.

 
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Art and Architecture Archive – great new online resource!

By Jul.25, 2017

We’re very pleased to announce that you now have access to a brilliant new resource for art, architecture and all design subjects. Art and Architecture Archive consists of scanned articles from journals, so it is great for full colour illustrations as well as full text. It covers the years 1895-2005, a much longer historical period than our other journal resources for this subject area. It is potentially very useful for visual arts, art history, architecture, graphic design, interior design, photography and many other subjects.

To access it – from Library Search choose Databases, then choose Art and Architecture Archive from the A-Z list. Network username and password are required off-campus.

 
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Is formatting your dissertation/thesis harder than you expected?

By Jul.17, 2017

If you’re struggling with word processing your dissertation/thesis, then you’re not alone. It can be a demanding task, with many students find this aspect of the process more time consuming and stressful than they anticipated. But MS Word provides tools and features that make this task so much easier to manage. You can save time, learn the skills to work more effectively and reduce your anxiety levels too.

Do you know how to…?

  • Create an automatic table of contents for your document headings?
  • Apply Word’s ‘Captions’ for figures and tables, and create automatic listings for them?
  • Apply different page numbering formats to the different parts of your document?
  • Change page orientation mid-document, e.g. to accommodate a large chart?

No? What??? Then you need to check out our handbook and video resources…

Handbook and Videos

These resources focus on the key MS Word tools and features that you should know about and use when Formatting your dissertation/thesis.

Image of video screens

 

 
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Disability Awareness Day, Sunday 16th July

By Jul.05, 2017

Did you know that Sunday 16th July is Disability Awareness Day? The world’s largest voluntary-led disability exhibition is held in the grounds of Walton Hall Gardens, Warrington. For more details please see http://www.disabilityawarenessday.org.uk

The University of Salford, and The Library in particular, have many features in place to ensure their services are as accessible as possible. These include mind-mapping software (Inspiration), screen reading (Jaws), and the numerous applications available on My Study Bar – the latter should be available on all networked student pcs. To find out more, including accessible access to the different Library sites, go to http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/help/accessibility

 
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Finding Patents

By Jul.04, 2017

Looking for patents? Anne shows you where you can find them.

Patents are useful as they can show the latest technological development in a particular field, and often describe significant developments long before they are revealed elsewhere. If you are working in a field of engineering, for example, and need to think of a design solution to a particular problem you might like to look at some patents for inspiration.

Scopus

You might be familiar with Scopus for finding journal articles, but did you know it provides access to over 28 million patents from five patent offices as well?

  • European Patent Office
  • Japan Patent Office
  • UK Intellectual Property Office
  • US Patent & Trademark Office
  • World Intellectual Property Organization

To access Scopus go to the Library’s Resources page, click the letter ‘S‘, select ‘SCOPUS’, then click ‘Link to Database’.

Scopus search screen

re-order by relevance

Because the patents on Scopus are drawn from different offices, the pages you click through to will look different – but look for links called “Image” or “Original Document”, etc.

You might find some great designs:

USPTO 595629

And you will almost certainly find some strange ones:

JPS 6031276

I think this cat has every right to look alarmed, don’t you?

 

Do you know how to reference a patent?

A reference for a patent is in this format:

Inventor, A. B. (Year). Title of patent. Patent Office No. Patent number.

For example:

Ichihara, A., & Maruta, F. (1984). Cat Washing Bag. Japan Patent Office No. JPS59139052U

Now here’s the tricky part!

Your in-text citation uses the Patent Office number and year, but not the inventor.
So this one would be:
(Japan Patent No. JPS59139052U, 1984) or
Japan Patent No. JPS59139052U (1984).

If you wish though, you can include the inventors’ names in your text, for example:

Ichihara and Maruta’s innovative design (Japan Patent No. JPS59139052U, 1984) helped restrain cats for the purpose of washing …

 
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Copyright – for musicians, performers, artists, filmmakers, writers…

By Jul.03, 2017

Copyrightuser.org logoDo you want to know whether you can “borrow” from someone else’s work for your own performance or artwork? Do you want guidance on how to seek permission to use someone else’s work, or to protect your own?

A great place to start when looking for anything on copyright for the creative industries is COPYRIGHTUSER.ORG.

This online resource provides easy to read, accessible information on copyright law for people engaged in the creative industries. It has sections for musicians, film-makers, performers, writers, visual artists and developers. There is a helpful FAQs section, and the guidance includes videos, as well as links to further resources.  All well worth exploring.

 
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Email etiquette tips

By Jun.30, 2017

 

Email etiquette cartoon

Cham, J. (2015). How to write an e-mail to your instructor or T.A. Retrieved from http://phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1795

 

 

When emailing friends it is fine to use an a familiar and informal style, however, when you write an email about a job application or internship, an interview or when emailing your tutors it is good practice to adopt a more formal style.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips for writing a formal email:

  • First impressions count – Think about your email address a prospective employer might remember you for all the wrong reasons if you contact them using an email address such as wildandcrazygeek@gmail.com.  It is a much better idea to use your university email account – you can forward emails from this account to your personal email using the instructions here.
  • Include a greeting– if you know your tutor using their first name in the greeting is fine. If you do not have a familiar relationship with them then use their family name e.g. Dear Dr. Smith.  If you are applying for a job and don’t know the name of the person who will be reading your email it is good practice to include the greeting Dear Sir or Madam.
  • Use the subject line and be informative – try to avoid just typing “hello” or “help”. If emailing your tutor tell them why you are contacting them e.g. Query about case study in Clinical Skills lecture.  If you are applying for a job include details about the job being applied for e.g. Application for Library Assistant post ref: LIB/6291.
  • Avoid text speak – Save ROFL and YOLO for emails to friends. Use full sentences and punctuation when emailing tutors and prospective employers.  Use the spell check to make sure your message is correct before pressing send.
  • DON’T SHOUT – Names, dates, places, most acronyms and the start of a new sentence should be capitalised, entire sentences shouldn’t.
  • Size matters – Tutors and employers are busy people so be as concise as possible. Also avoid sending large attachments – find information about compressing files here.
  • Provide details – Give the person you are contacting the information they need to answer your query effectively e.g. if you are querying something that was said in a lecture include the date and time.
  • Good manners cost nothing but are always appreciated – include a please and thank you when making a request.

    Photo of Sue

    Sue is blogging about email etiquette.

  • Include a sign off:
    1. To a tutor – “best wishes” or “regards”
    2. To a prospective employer you have addressed as Dear Sir or Madam the sign off should be “Yours faithfully”.
    3. To a prospective employer when the name is known e.g. Dear Mr. Smith the sign off should be “Yours sincerely”.

The sign off should be followed by your full name.

 

 
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Digital Theatre +

By Jun.27, 2017


 

 

 

 

Want to view a critically acclaimed  production of The Crucible, see David Tenant play Hamlet, or view any one of over 160 classic and contemporary theatre productions? Take a look at Digital Theatre +

Digital Theatre + is an educational service, providing high quality video of performances, alongside lots of materials to support the study of theatre, including interviews with directors and writers as well as resources on theatre genres and styles.

You can connect to Digital Theatre + via Library Search, both on or off campus.

Enjoy!

 

 
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Finding pictures the legal way 3/3

By Jun.26, 2017

Welcome to the third in this series on searching for images the legal way. If you missed them, check out part one (using Google image search and Microsoft to find legal images), and part two (safe picture search engines).

Today we’re meeting (possibly) the best colour search engine in the world, also known as the Multicolr Search Engine from TinEye Labs. Use it to search for pictures by colour. This is a fantastic tool, especially if you’re trying to build a colour scheme for a visual piece of work. All the images have a creative commons licence, which means they are going to be fine to reuse in your academic and professional work.

  • Step 1: Select up to five colours
  • Step 2: Adjust the proportion of the colours, if you wish
  • Step 3: Add tags to refine your search. Here I’ve used ‘garden’
  • Enjoy the results. These pictures are OK for you to download and use.

But the TinEye Labs goodness doesn’t stop there. Its second tool to try is the colour extraction tool.

This allows you to take the colours from an image and use them in any way you choose – it would work well if you want to create a colour scheme for an academic poster from an existing picture.

 
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Searching for pictures the legal way 2/3

By Jun.23, 2017

Welcome to part two of this series on searching for pictures the legal way. If you missed part one, it’s here. If you know how to do a Google search for an image that’s ‘licenced for reuse’ you’ve made a good start. But sometimes the results from Google alone can be disappointing.

Fortunately, there are many other search engines that are dedicated to finding free-to-use images that are licenced for reuse. My favourite is Pixabay – because it’s powerful and intuitive to use. But there are many others which are worth a try:

Openphoto

Morguefile

Unsplash

Pexels

Creative Commons Search

Flickr Creative Commons

Photopin

Next time: Meet (possibly) the best colour search engine of them all

 
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