Posts by Joanna

Copyright – for musicians, performers, artists, filmmakers, writers…

3 July 2017

Copyrightuser.org logoDo you want to know whether you can “borrow” from someone else’s work for your own performance or artwork? Do you want guidance on how to seek permission to use someone else’s work, or to protect your own?

A great place to start when looking for anything on copyright for the creative industries is COPYRIGHTUSER.ORG.

This online resource provides easy to read, accessible information on copyright law for people engaged in the creative industries. It has sections for musicians, film-makers, performers, writers, visual artists and developers. There is a helpful FAQs section, and the guidance includes videos, as well as links to further resources.  All well worth exploring.

Digital Theatre +

27 June 2017


 

 

 

 

Want to view a critically acclaimed  production of The Crucible, see David Tenant play Hamlet, or view any one of over 160 classic and contemporary theatre productions? Take a look at Digital Theatre +

Digital Theatre + is an educational service, providing high quality video of performances, alongside lots of materials to support the study of theatre, including interviews with directors and writers as well as resources on theatre genres and styles.

You can connect to Digital Theatre + via Library Search, both on or off campus.

Enjoy!

 

Studying Theatre or Dance? – Check out Alexander Street Video

30 May 2017

 

Alexander Street Video provides recordings of classic performances, as well as documentary information on all sorts of related topics.  You will find material on the history of theatre, playwrights, actors, directors, choreographers, theatre and dance companies, production staging & design, and performance methods and styles.

To get access, go via Library Search (Sign-in with your University username and password, search for Alexander Street Video and click on the link for online access).

The Disciplines tab will allow you to select Music & Performing Arts and from there you can explore videos on Theatre and Dance.

 

 

Looking for newspaper articles? – Try Nexis Business and News

22 May 2017

If you are searching for full text newspaper articles on almost any topic, Nexis Business and News is a great place to start. It provides content from local, regional and national papers from around the world.

You can find Nexis via Library search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  1. Connect to Library Search
  2. Search for Nexis Business and News
  3. The database should be the first item in the search results. Click on the link for online access

You can use the search box to type in keywords, but your search will be more focussed, if you set some other criteria.

It may be helpful l to –

  • Select where your keywords must appear – either in the headline, at the start of the article, or maybe as “major mentions”
  • Select which dates you want to search.
  • Select what which news publications you want to search. For example you may want to restrict your search to UK National Newspapers, or to Major World Publications (English)

The full text of any articles you find can be read on screen, or downloaded as a file for you to save.

For more guidance, look for the links to help screens and video tutorials on the main search page.

 

 

Want to watch a good film? – Try Box of Broadcasts

12 May 2017

Did you know that you have access to an enormous number of films via Box of Broadcasts?

By Joanna Wilson
Academic Support Librarian

Box of Broadcasts (often referred to as BoB), contains recordings of TV and radio programmes, including recordings of lots of films.

Whether you want to explore the work of a particular director, watch a film from your favourite genre, analyse a classic film, or just take a break from your studies, you can check whether a film is available to you via BoB.

Connecting to Box of Broadcasts –

Go via Library Search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  • Connect to the University’s Library Search (via this link, or use Google by searching for Library Search Salford)
  • Sign in to Library Search with your network username and password
  • Type Box of Broadcasts in the search box.
  • Box of Broadcasts should be the first item in the results list. Click on the online access link.
  • If you haven’t used BoB before you will be asked to set up a profile – it’s quick and easy, but make sure you use your university email address.

Tips for finding the film you want to watch –

 Simple search –

In Box of Broadcasts – click on the Search button and enter your film title.

Pick out the film from the results list, click on the title and enjoy!

 Search Options –

If you get too many results and can’t see your film, use the Search Options. Restricting your search to Title Only, may narrow down the results enough for you to pick out the film you want.

If the title uses very common words, you may need to add more information by including an actor or director’s name. If you do this you can’t search Titles only, so select Exclude transcripts or All fields instead.

Happy viewing!

Fake News

7 April 2017

Be a savvy news consumer – Joanna gives some useful reminders.

Fake news has become a hot news topic! We all want our news to be accurate, truthful, and honest, so how do you sort out truth from lies, or identify exaggerated stories, or facts reported out of context?

The simplest strategy is to make sure you get your news from a variety of sources – don’t get stuck in your own media “bubble”. Be critical and analyse any news you share on social media.  We all have a responsibility not to spread lies.

There are no hard and fast rules, but here are some things to think about –

  • Beware sensational headlines. Not every shocking headline is associated with fake news – but it’s a warning sign.
  • Be very cautious about stories intended to prompt an extreme emotional response, particularly anger. Verify the story from other known, reliable sources.
  • Check whether other “mainstream” news sources are reporting the story.
  • Take a look at the domain name. Does it suggest a bias, or potential unreliability?
  • Check out the “About us” tab, or look at the contact details. Is the content attributable to a “real” person, or an identifiable organisation? Do they have a particular agenda? Look for more information about the author or organisation.
  • Look for supporting evidence. Use a fact checking site if appropriate (FullFact.org Factcheck.org, Politifact.com, Snopes.com etc). Follow up links to research studies, or data sources. Ask yourself if they are authoritative. Look for other reports about the same study. Remember fake news doesn’t have to be “made up”. Facts reported selectively can be dangerously misleading.

Looking for more?

For a more comprehensive overview of Fake News and how to spot it, check out the University of Rhode Island’s excellent resource

News Literacy and Alternative Facts: How to Be a Responsible Information Consumer

And Remember –

As University students you should routinely evaluate all the resources you use for your own research and assignments, particularly anything found via internet sources.

  1. How up-to-date is the information? Is it still current?
  2. Is this information source going to help me write my essay? Is it relevant to my topic?
  3. Is this “the right sort” of information – is it suitable for academic purposes? Is the author an expert in this subject area? Is the information reliable and accurate?
  4. Why has this information been written? What is its purpose? Is there any bias I need to take account of?

Finding scores and sheet music

17 February 2017

Need to find scores and sheet music via the Library? Joanna tells you how.

Finding printed music in the Library

The Library holds over 2000 printed music items, most of which can be borrowed. They are shelved on the ground floor in Clifford Whitworth Library, or in our store.  Use Library Search to look up what you want and find its location. If an item is in store, use the Request option in Library Search and we will retrieve it for you.  It will usually be available for collection the following working day.

If we don’t have what you need, you can ask us to try to get it for you. We will buy it to add to our stock, or borrow it from another library, just remember it may take us a couple of weeks to get hold of it for you

 

Other places to look for scores-

Henry Watson Music Library

A huge collection of books and printed music held at Manchester Central Library. You can use the collection as a guest, or join the Library if you live in Manchester.

Finding printed music online

There are lots of useful websites providing access to scores.  However, please be aware that copyright law usually limits access to newer material – see the Copyright note below on UK Law.

IMSLP Petrucci Music Library

A great resource containing over 100,000 works, by over 14,000 composers. (Ignore or close the rather distracting ads towards the top of the page)

Choral Domain Public Library

Over 20,000 scores of choral and vocal works. You can search for scores by category (eg. madrigals), by composer, or by title.

Mutopia Project

Free sheet music arranged by composer, instrument or style.

Music Treasures Consortium

Brings together the collections of significant music libraries (mostly North American) including access to digital images of original (manuscript) scores.

Sheet Music Consortium

A research tool that allows you to search over 20 music collections and archives for sheet music. (When searching you may want to restrict your search to digitized sheet music, so your results only include music that is available online).

Music societies and other websites

Significant composers, or particular music genres often have an associated Societies or organisations whose websites can be a rich source of information, including access to scores. Examples include Web Library of Seventeenth Century Music, Chopin Online Catalog, Bach Digital, Broadside Ballads online

For traditional music it’s worth checking out ITMA (Irish Traditional Music Archive) and Full English (English folk songs, dance & customs archive).

Guides to finding scores & sheet music

Yale University Library has an excellent guide to finding scores online, that is well worth exploring, although it has a North American focus.

The Free Sheet Music Guide outlines how to get hold of music to play in all sorts of genres, including pop and rock. (But please be aware of copyright restrictions).

 

Copyright note

UK copyright law provides protection to a work for 70 years from the death of the author/composer. (For works with more than one author/composer the protection applies for 70 years from the death of the last surviving creator).  UK law also protects the “typographical arrangement” (the publishers version of the work) for 25 years.

There is excellent advice and guidance for Musicians regarding copyright at http://copyrightuser.org/

Broadcast – keep up-to-date with the broadcasting industy

16 February 2017

Keep up-to-date with the broadcast industry with Joanna’s guide.

Looking for news, data, or commentary on the broadcast industry?  Broadcast is a weekly magazine (in print) and  online resource, providing material on all aspects of the media, including news, commissioning, analysis, opinion, interviews, platforms, production and ratings.

We keep the printed copy at the University Library at Media City, but you can use the online version from anywhere. So, if you want to get details of the next “reality” TV show, or trace the rise of Netflix as a media player, register for an account and get browsing.

Access to Broadcast – register for an account

The University pays a subscription to give all our staff and students get free access, but you still need to register to get a personal account.

Step 1

Go to the Broadcast page in Salford’s Library Search.

http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/access-to-e-resources/library-databases/broadcast/_nocache

 

 Step 2

Click the link to complete the online form to register.

On Campus – you will be taken straight to the form. Many of the fields won’t be relevant to you as a student.  Just pick an option and move to the next field.

Off Campus – you will be asked for your University username and password, then select Register and complete the registration form as above.

Using your account

Once you have registered, you can use your account to get full access

Always use the link (above) in Library Search, then make sure you are signed in

 

If you want to search for a particular issue or date – use the publication index

http://salford.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://www.broadcastnow.co.uk/publication-index/

 

Access hints and tips

You can find yourself being asked to pay for content, although you think you are signed in.

  • Check you are actually signed in. Your name should appear towards the top right-hand side of the screen.
  • Check you haven’t accidently opened another copy of Broadcast. Sign out of any previous copies.

 

Information sources for Journalism – useful databases

27 January 2017

Databases for Journalism students 

Library Search is a great way to start a search for information on a particular topic, but if you want to use a specialist database, we have a huge range of sources that can provide you with information.  The list below is just a small selection.

Databases

    • Academic Search Premier – general full text journal article resource, good for a wide range of subject areas.
    • Arts & Humanities Index – titles include both scholarly journals and selected trade and consumer titles relevant to applied arts and cultural studies. Subject strengths include music, theatre, film and cultural studies.
    • Broadcast – a weekly online (and print) magazine covering the UK TV and radio industry. Useful for broadcasting news, commissioning, analysis and opinion.
    • Box of Broadcasts – provides access to an archive of TV and radio programmes from UK broadcasters. Allows you to request recordings of programmes yet to be broadcast (from the next 7 days).
    • Business Source Premier –journal articles, reports and books on business topics
    • Communication & Mass Media Complete – covers all aspects of communications, including media technology and social impacts.
    • Performing Arts Periodicals database – journal articles on all aspects of artistic performance, including film and broadcasting.
    • Nexis – full text press articles from regional, national and international newspapers and magazines.
    • Web of Science – despite its name this is a very useful and comprehensive resource for all social science topics – often worth checking.
    • Public Information Onlinecontains information from the Westminster and the UK’s regional parliaments/assemblies, plus a range of non-parliamentary material.
    • Westlaw includes articles from legal journals. (Remember to select Journals before you search, unless you are also looking for other legal material.)

 

Historical sources

  • Periodicals Archive Online – collection of full text journal backfiles from 1891 to 2000; useful for providing access to older material.
  • British Pathe – digital news archive, enabling the viewing of Pathe news clips from 1896 to 1970. Useful for and documentary.

To identify other relevant databases and get guidance on searching for information in a particular subject area, check out the Subject Support – Skills for Learning