Posts about: Library Basics

How to find construction contracts

12 June 2017
Tracy Breheny

Tracy explains how to locate various construction contracts you may need for your studies.

When undertaking your studies you may find you need to access a number of different contracts.  These contracts can be tricky to find as they are often  located in various places.  We have access to various construction contracts through Library Search. Library Search can be found here:  https://sal-primo-production.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo-explore/search?vid=SAL_MAIN&lang=en_US&sortby=rank. It is always worth signing in to Library Search as soon as you access it for ease of use off-campus.

We have pulled together a list of construction contracts that you might need to be able to find, with guidance on how to locate them:

 

NEC contracts

We have a collection of NEC contracts available through Library Search.  To access these:

  1. Go to Library Search.
  2. Sign yourself into Library Search by clicking on Sign-in (top right-hand corner of the Library Search homepage) and then enter your network username and password.
  3. Type NEC in Academia into the main Library Search box.
  4. Follow the link and you will be promted to log in with your network username and password.  You will then have access to all of the NEC contracts and documents, which can be read online and/or downloaded.

JCT contracts

JCT contracts are available through our Construction Information Service database.  To access these:

  1. Go to Library Search.
  2. Sign yourself into Library Search by clicking on Sign-in (top right-hand corner of the Library Search homepage) and then enter your network username and password.
  3. Type Construction Information Service into the Library Search box.
  4. Click on the link and select  Construction Information Service – CIS from the list of databases given.  Because you have already logged into Library Search, this should allow you access to all of the content we subscribe to.  You will then have access to all of the JCT contracts and documents, which can be read online and/or downloaded.
  5. When searching for a specific JCT contract it helps to include the year, for example JCT contract 2016

FIDIC contracts

We  have access to the FIDIC contract suite, is also contained in the Construction Information Service database.  To access FIDIC contracts:

  1. Go to Library Search.
  2. Sign yourself into Library Search by clicking on Sign-in (top right-hand corner of the Library Search homepage) and then enter your network username and password.
  3. Type Construction Information Service into the Library Search box.
  4. Click on the link and select  Construction Information Service – CIS from the list of databases given.  Because you have already logged into Library Search, this should allow you access to all of the content we subscribe to.  You will then have access to all of the FIDIC contracts and documents, which can be read online and/or downloaded.

 

A really useful, key construction-related database you may also want to access is  Construction Information Service.

Construction Information Service is really useful database which holds a variety of UK construction industry-based resources.  This database contains a variety of information ranging from contracts to building regulations.  It can be accessed through Library Search (you will need to sign into it with your network username and password if you are off-campus, as detailed above).  This database is definitely worth a look if you are interested in construction, building surveying, quantity surveying, civil engineering and architecture.

 

If you have any questions about construction contracts, please contact your Academic Support Librarian for further help: http://blogs.salford.ac.uk/digital-literacy-skills/subject-support/

Welcome to all new students!

12 June 2017

 

Tracy Breheny

Tracy talks about how you can get ahead as a new student.

 

Welcome to all new starters this month!

 

Being a new student can be a little overwhelming at first, with you being given lots of information and meeting lots of new people.  To make things a little easier, we have put together two information packages as part of our Skills for Learning programme that we hope you will find useful.

 

 

There is a Get Going package which you will have been sent prior to the start of your course.  This package contains really useful information on getting started at University and where you can get help with things, should you need it.  It helps you develop your academic learning skills to become an independent learner.

 

If you haven’t taken a look at this yet, you can access it here:  http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/get-going/get-going

 

Following on from Get Going, we have Get Ahead, which is a package deisgned to help you discover computing, library, research and study essentials for getting ahead in your studies.  If you haven’t taken a look at this yet, you can access it here:  http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/get-going/library.

 

There are also lots of workshops and library tours running for new students; find out about them and book on here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/get-going

 

Both of these packages, plus lots more information and library, research, study and digital skills support can be found on our Skills for Learning webpage here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning.  You may also find it useful to see what other students thought about starting here at Salford by visiting our Student Diaries page: http://blogs.salford.ac.uk/digital-literacy-skills/new-salford-not-alone-studentdiaries/ 

 

You may find it useful to keep up-to-date with things by:

 

Welcome to the University of Salford and good luck with your course!

 

 

 

 

Looking for dissertations and theses? Library Search can help.

29 May 2017
Tracy Breheny

Tracy talks you through finding and accessing dissertations and theses.

During the course of your studies, you may find that you need to look for dissertations or theses.  Maybe you would like to see what other research has been undertaken in relation to your topic, or perhaps you would like to see what a dissertation or thesis looks like.

You can use Library Search to help you find them and there are a number of different ways to search depending on what you want.

Finding University of Salford dissertations and theses

You can use the ‘Advanced Search’ option in Library Search to find the dissertations and theses by previous University of Salford students.

To find out how to do this, take a look here: http://salford.libanswers.com/faq/94021

Using databases to find other dissertations and theses

There are a number of databases you can use to find dissertations and theses from other academic insitutions.  You can access these through Library Search.

To find out how to do this, take a look here: http://salford.libanswers.com/e-resources/faq/137926

 

Helpful tips when looking for dissertations and theses:

  • Select a couple of keywords and use these when searching.  Don’t try to enter too many keywords all at once as it’s often useful to see what else there is around your topic.  Also, entering too many keywords can make your search too specific and you may struggle to fnd what you need.
  • Can’t find what you need? Many databases only contain PhD level manuscripts.  Using advanced search options within certain databases can sometimes allow you to specify other manuscript levels.
  • Don’t worry about topic area too much if you just want to see what one looks like.  Looking at any of them should give you an idea of layout and format.  Always check any guidelines you have been given by your school.

 

 

Writing a dissertation ?  Need further help?

There is lots of help available for students writing or preparing to write a dissertation.  Check out our Skills for Learning webpage here for further support:   http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/reading-and-writing.

 

Looking for newspaper articles? – Try Nexis Business and News

22 May 2017

If you are searching for full text newspaper articles on almost any topic, Nexis Business and News is a great place to start. It provides content from local, regional and national papers from around the world.

You can find Nexis via Library search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  1. Connect to Library Search
  2. Search for Nexis Business and News
  3. The database should be the first item in the search results. Click on the link for online access

You can use the search box to type in keywords, but your search will be more focussed, if you set some other criteria.

It may be helpful l to –

  • Select where your keywords must appear – either in the headline, at the start of the article, or maybe as “major mentions”
  • Select which dates you want to search.
  • Select what which news publications you want to search. For example you may want to restrict your search to UK National Newspapers, or to Major World Publications (English)

The full text of any articles you find can be read on screen, or downloaded as a file for you to save.

For more guidance, look for the links to help screens and video tutorials on the main search page.

 

 

The CDs and DVDs in Clifford Whitworth Library have moved!

16 May 2017
Andy Callen

Andy tells you about the new location for audio-visual resources in the Library.

 

Our CDs and DVDs are now in a much better and more obvious location – on Level 2 of Clifford Whitworth Library, just in front of the link bridge to the Level 2 Extension. This means that they are now very close to the Arts and Media bookstock in the Extension. Please remember though that they are not just for Arts & Media use – there are non-fiction DVDs relevant to many subject areas in the collection. Also you may wish to borrow feature films or music CDs for your own entertainment – most items here are available to borrow.

Want to watch a good film? – Try Box of Broadcasts

12 May 2017

Did you know that you have access to an enormous number of films via Box of Broadcasts?

By Joanna Wilson
Academic Support Librarian

Box of Broadcasts (often referred to as BoB), contains recordings of TV and radio programmes, including recordings of lots of films.

Whether you want to explore the work of a particular director, watch a film from your favourite genre, analyse a classic film, or just take a break from your studies, you can check whether a film is available to you via BoB.

Connecting to Box of Broadcasts –

Go via Library Search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  • Connect to the University’s Library Search (via this link, or use Google by searching for Library Search Salford)
  • Sign in to Library Search with your network username and password
  • Type Box of Broadcasts in the search box.
  • Box of Broadcasts should be the first item in the results list. Click on the online access link.
  • If you haven’t used BoB before you will be asked to set up a profile – it’s quick and easy, but make sure you use your university email address.

Tips for finding the film you want to watch –

 Simple search –

In Box of Broadcasts – click on the Search button and enter your film title.

Pick out the film from the results list, click on the title and enjoy!

 Search Options –

If you get too many results and can’t see your film, use the Search Options. Restricting your search to Title Only, may narrow down the results enough for you to pick out the film you want.

If the title uses very common words, you may need to add more information by including an actor or director’s name. If you do this you can’t search Titles only, so select Exclude transcripts or All fields instead.

Happy viewing!

How to Manage Your Time: The Essentials

8 May 2017
Catherine Tomlin

This week Catherine is sharing her time management tips.

6 Essential Time Management Tips

1. Set clear goals. Try setting yourself SMART goals.

 

2. Record how you plan to use your time.

Use a diary, phone calendar or a time management app.

 

3. Stay motivated by focusing on results and achievements.

Reward yourself each time you complete a goal or a task.

 

4. Prioritise tasks

Tasks can be grouped into four categories:

  • urgent and important
  • not urgent but important
  • urgent but not important
  • neither urgent nor important

Always work from the top down!

 

5. Be honest with yourself about Timestealers:

What is stealing your time?

  • Procrastination
  • Chores
  • Internet
  • Mobile
  • Other people

How can you beat these timestealers?

 

6. Take care of your wellbeing.

Tasks can feel impossible if you are tired, hungry, stressed…

Stay healthy at Salford

 

Panicking about Exams? Come to our Exams and Revision Workshop 2nd May 2pm

26 April 2017

With exams looming you may feel like panicking…


Hold that thought! The Skills for Learning Team are delivering an exam and revision workshop on 2nd May at 2pm.

We’ll be covering exam preparation, revision strategies and top tips for the day of your exam.

Book on to the workshop via the following link:

https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/detail/509639

Any questions please email studyskills@salford.ac.uk

 

Hamlet’s Exam – the soliloquy Hamlet never delivered while he was at University in Wittenberg

21 April 2017

Lynne shares some Shakespearean thoughts about exams in honour of Shakespeare Day.

In honour of Shakespeare Day (23rd April), here is the soliloquy Hamlet never delivered while he was at University in Wittenberg.

Hamlet ponders exams

2B, or not 2B: that is the question:
Whether ‘tis nobler in the test to hazard
To scrap and erase the outrageous reference,
Or to make plans towards sensible essays,
And by planning finish them? Revise: to sleep
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart ache and the thousand natural shocks
Of losing our notes, ‘tis an avoidance
Devoutly to be wish’d. Revise, or sleep;
To sleep: perchance over-sleep: ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep what exams we may miss
When we have snuggled in this warm duvet
Must give us pause: there’s the prospect
That makes calamity of such long tests;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The examiner’s call, the proud student’s wrist cramp,
The pangs of missed data, results day,
The temperature of summer exam halls
That concentration of the student takes,
When they themselves might their leisure make,
Round a pub table? Who would text books bear,
To grunt and sweat over an exam paper,
But that the dread of something after term,
The undiscover’d results on whose decree
Some student resits, puzzles the will
And makes us rather swot past papers we have
Than chance those questions that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the healthy hue of nervous first years
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And revision plans of great depth and detail
With this regard their purpose turn awry,
And lose the name of action.
*       *       *       *       *       *       *       *       *       *

Good Ladies and Gentlemen,
Should this speech seem to see into your heart,
You should read our guides to the exam art.
Exeunt with alarums

Top Revision Tips

17 April 2017

If you have exams coming up in the next month or so, you might be thinking about how to get the best from your revision.

  1. Time! When is/are your exam(s)? Look at your calendar and block out any times you know you can’t revise because you’re at a wedding / in lectures / working / abseiling down the Eiffel Tower. How much time do you have left? Revision tends to work best in small chunks, so try to plan some little-and-often revision slots.
  2. Reward yourself! You need breaks, and you need to do something enjoyable to give your brain time to recover from all that revision. Plan some treats, quiet time off or nights out with friends so that you have chance to relax as well as study.
  3. Don’t just highlight! Highlighting and re-reading chunks of information probably won’t help it to sink in. Do something ‘active’ with your notes so that you can understand and process the information: rewrite it in different words, draw diagrams, discuss the topic with someone or tell the goldfish everything you know about it.
  4. Use past papers! If you have access to past papers, use them. They will help you to become familiar with the kinds of questions you’ll be asked, the wording, the length of answer required and so on.
  5. It’s not just a memory test… Exams are about demonstrating understanding of a topic and applying it to a question or situation, not just regurgitating facts. Think about how the things you’re revising would be used in practice or real life.

…and if you need something to take your mind off all that revision, have a look at Lynne’s lovely poem from this time last year!