Posts about: Arts and Media

Studying Theatre or Dance? – Check out Alexander Street Video

30 May 2017

 

Alexander Street Video provides recordings of classic performances, as well as documentary information on all sorts of related topics.  You will find material on the history of theatre, playwrights, actors, directors, choreographers, theatre and dance companies, production staging & design, and performance methods and styles.

To get access, go via Library Search (Sign-in with your University username and password, search for Alexander Street Video and click on the link for online access).

The Disciplines tab will allow you to select Music & Performing Arts and from there you can explore videos on Theatre and Dance.

 

 

Looking for newspaper articles? – Try Nexis Business and News

22 May 2017

If you are searching for full text newspaper articles on almost any topic, Nexis Business and News is a great place to start. It provides content from local, regional and national papers from around the world.

You can find Nexis via Library search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  1. Connect to Library Search
  2. Search for Nexis Business and News
  3. The database should be the first item in the search results. Click on the link for online access

You can use the search box to type in keywords, but your search will be more focussed, if you set some other criteria.

It may be helpful l to –

  • Select where your keywords must appear – either in the headline, at the start of the article, or maybe as “major mentions”
  • Select which dates you want to search.
  • Select what which news publications you want to search. For example you may want to restrict your search to UK National Newspapers, or to Major World Publications (English)

The full text of any articles you find can be read on screen, or downloaded as a file for you to save.

For more guidance, look for the links to help screens and video tutorials on the main search page.

 

 

The CDs and DVDs in Clifford Whitworth Library have moved!

16 May 2017
Andy Callen

Andy tells you about the new location for audio-visual resources in the Library.

 

Our CDs and DVDs are now in a much better and more obvious location – on Level 2 of Clifford Whitworth Library, just in front of the link bridge to the Level 2 Extension. This means that they are now very close to the Arts and Media bookstock in the Extension. Please remember though that they are not just for Arts & Media use – there are non-fiction DVDs relevant to many subject areas in the collection. Also you may wish to borrow feature films or music CDs for your own entertainment – most items here are available to borrow.

Want to watch a good film? – Try Box of Broadcasts

12 May 2017

Did you know that you have access to an enormous number of films via Box of Broadcasts?

By Joanna Wilson
Academic Support Librarian

Box of Broadcasts (often referred to as BoB), contains recordings of TV and radio programmes, including recordings of lots of films.

Whether you want to explore the work of a particular director, watch a film from your favourite genre, analyse a classic film, or just take a break from your studies, you can check whether a film is available to you via BoB.

Connecting to Box of Broadcasts –

Go via Library Search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  • Connect to the University’s Library Search (via this link, or use Google by searching for Library Search Salford)
  • Sign in to Library Search with your network username and password
  • Type Box of Broadcasts in the search box.
  • Box of Broadcasts should be the first item in the results list. Click on the online access link.
  • If you haven’t used BoB before you will be asked to set up a profile – it’s quick and easy, but make sure you use your university email address.

Tips for finding the film you want to watch –

 Simple search –

In Box of Broadcasts – click on the Search button and enter your film title.

Pick out the film from the results list, click on the title and enjoy!

 Search Options –

If you get too many results and can’t see your film, use the Search Options. Restricting your search to Title Only, may narrow down the results enough for you to pick out the film you want.

If the title uses very common words, you may need to add more information by including an actor or director’s name. If you do this you can’t search Titles only, so select Exclude transcripts or All fields instead.

Happy viewing!

Alexander Street Video – great resource for all subject areas

11 April 2017
Andy Callen

Andy describes how Alexander Street Video might be a useful audio-visual resource for you.

Do you need to get hold of video material for your study or teaching, but it’s not on Box of Broadcasts or in the Library’s DVD collection?

Try Alexander Street Video, an online collection of non-fiction video material for educational use, potentially useful across all subject areas. It includes:

  • News clips from ITN
  • Instructional videos for teachers
  • Over 1,000 films on psychology and counselling
  • Numerous documentary films on artists and designers.

Access Alexander Street Video from the Databases link on Library Search, OR directly from search.alexanderstreet.com. Your Network username and password are required.

Any questions? Contact me at mailto:A.Callen@salford.ac.uk.

Fake News

7 April 2017

Be a savvy news consumer – Joanna gives some useful reminders.

Fake news has become a hot news topic! We all want our news to be accurate, truthful, and honest, so how do you sort out truth from lies, or identify exaggerated stories, or facts reported out of context?

The simplest strategy is to make sure you get your news from a variety of sources – don’t get stuck in your own media “bubble”. Be critical and analyse any news you share on social media.  We all have a responsibility not to spread lies.

There are no hard and fast rules, but here are some things to think about –

  • Beware sensational headlines. Not every shocking headline is associated with fake news – but it’s a warning sign.
  • Be very cautious about stories intended to prompt an extreme emotional response, particularly anger. Verify the story from other known, reliable sources.
  • Check whether other “mainstream” news sources are reporting the story.
  • Take a look at the domain name. Does it suggest a bias, or potential unreliability?
  • Check out the “About us” tab, or look at the contact details. Is the content attributable to a “real” person, or an identifiable organisation? Do they have a particular agenda? Look for more information about the author or organisation.
  • Look for supporting evidence. Use a fact checking site if appropriate (FullFact.org Factcheck.org, Politifact.com, Snopes.com etc). Follow up links to research studies, or data sources. Ask yourself if they are authoritative. Look for other reports about the same study. Remember fake news doesn’t have to be “made up”. Facts reported selectively can be dangerously misleading.

Looking for more?

For a more comprehensive overview of Fake News and how to spot it, check out the University of Rhode Island’s excellent resource

News Literacy and Alternative Facts: How to Be a Responsible Information Consumer

And Remember –

As University students you should routinely evaluate all the resources you use for your own research and assignments, particularly anything found via internet sources.

  1. How up-to-date is the information? Is it still current?
  2. Is this information source going to help me write my essay? Is it relevant to my topic?
  3. Is this “the right sort” of information – is it suitable for academic purposes? Is the author an expert in this subject area? Is the information reliable and accurate?
  4. Why has this information been written? What is its purpose? Is there any bias I need to take account of?

Do you know how to eSubmit your work?

3 April 2017
Amy Pearson

Amy points out handy resources to help you with e-Submission

Turnitin is used for the e-submission of your assignments. It is an online tool that you use to upload your work so that it can be marked by your tutor. You access Turnitin from Blackboard.

Important things you need to know about submitting your work for marking

  1. Use the correct naming convention for your files – your school may specify a particular format.
  2. Submit your completed assignment to the correct, FINAL submissions folder when it is ready for marking. Work submitted mistakenly to the DRAFT folder at this stage will not be marked.
  3. When you submit work for marking, you are accepting the submission declaration.
  4. Keep copies of email receipts from Turnitin as proof of submission.
  5. Check the file size. Files must be less than 40Mb. Contact your lecturer if your file is greater than 40Mb.
  6. Use an accepted file type. File types accepted are: MS Word, WordPerfect, PostScript, PDF, HTML, RTF or plain text. You can ask at The Library for help if you are not sure about a file type. For non text-based assessments (e.g. audio/video, etc.) your tutor may use the Blackboard Assignment Tool.

If you are unsure how to use Turnitin we have videos and guidance on the Skills for Learning website.

Planning and writing your assignment – your 5 steps to essay success!

20 March 2017
Amy Pearson

This time of year is all about assignments. Amy has shared the Skills for Learning 5 steps to essay success!

It’s that time of year again when deadlines are looming so we thought we’d share with you our 5 steps to essay success.

  • Step 1: Analyse and Plan
  • Step 2: Search and Evaluate
  • Step 3: Read and Make Notes
  • Step 4: Write your Essay
  • Step 5: Review and Submit

Read on to learn more about each step!

 

 

 

Step 1: Analyse and PlanStep 1: Analyse and Plan

When you are given a question or task to complete you need to make sure that you understand what you are being asked to do and then plan how you will approach it. If you don’t answer the question being set you are more likely to get a low mark. With this in mind, the first step to essay success is to ANALYSE and PLAN. This involves analysing your task, making a plan and identifying useful words that describe your topic. You need to make sure that you pay attention to the instructions you have been given, be clear about the topic you have been asked to explore and any restrictions to the scope of your answer.


Step 2: Search and EvaluateStep 2: Search and Evaluate

Next you need to search for information and evaluate the usefulness of what you find. You need to think about what you already know and where you could search for information. A useful way of evaluating sources is to ask yourself these questions:
1. How up-to-date is the information? Is it still CURRENT?
2. Is this information source going to help me write my essay? Is it RELEVANT to my topic?
3. Is this “the right sort” of information – is it suitable for academic purposes? Is the author an expert in this subject area? Is the information reliable and ACCURATE?
4. Why has this information been written? What is its PURPOSE? Is there any bias I need to take account of?


Step 3: Read and Make NotesStep 3: Read and Make Notes

Now you have your materials together, it’s time to start getting the information that you need from them. There are different ways to approach this task depending on what you are reading. If it is books then you might want to start by looking at the chapter headings to decide which will be most useful. If it is a journal article then it is a good idea to read the abstract first as this help you decide whether it is worth reading in detail. Next you need to read the introduction as this will tell you about the main argument of the article. Read the conclusion next for a summary of the main ideas and finally if you still think it is relevant you may want to read the rest in detail. Make sure you annotate and summarise as you read.

 


Step 4: Write your EssayStep 4: Write your Essay

By now you should have a good idea about how you are going to answer the question. It is a good idea to re-visit your plan as it may have changed as a result of all the research and reading you have done! Give some thought to how you will structure your essay – it will need an introduction, a main body and a conclusion. The introduction tells the reader how you will answer the question. The main body is the ideas and analysis to support your argument, it is your opportunity to critically analyse the topic. Finally, the conclusion tells the reader how you have answered the question. Don’t forget to paraphrase, summarise and reference correctly as you write.

 


Step 5: Review and SubmitStep 5: Review and submit

Leave plenty of time to proofread your work paying particular attention to spelling, grammar, the question, word count and references and citations. When you are happy with your essay and confident that you have done your best to answer the question you can submit it.

 

 


Learn more

  1. Have a look at our 5 Steps to Essay Success online resource for more detail about each step.
  2. Read our study guides:
    – Writing your assignment
    – Reading and note making
    – Spelling and apostrophes
    – Proof Reading
  3. Book on to the Planning and Writing your Assignment workshop

LS:N – reminder of a great resource in Design

20 February 2017
Andy Callen

Read why Andy thinks LS:N is a great electronic resource.

Just wanted to remind you about the excellent electronic resource for all Design subjects, LS:N Global. LS:N is a trend prediction database that complements the use of WGSN (for Fashion) and Mintel (general business reports). It is extremely useful for business information and analysis, it has up-to-date and easily readable articles that can inform your written work, and great illustrations to inspire your creative work. LS:N is also potentially very useful for other subject areas such as Business and Management.

It’s the kind of database that is best explored by clicking on all its links, but particularly recommended are:

  • The Search function if you’re looking for a particular topic; there are also Filters to limit your search further. Try a search for youth to get results on youth fashion and the importance of youth trends in influencing design.
  • The Trends link for the consumer trends that drive innovation and change in design.
  • Inform for the opinions of industry experts, which would be especially useful for your assignments.
  • There is a Glossary at the bottom of the screen that gives you definitions for the terms used in the articles.

You access LS:N from www.lsnglobal.com  or from the A-Z list in Databases, from Library Search (the Library Catalogue). Please note you will need your Network username and password to access it off campus.

Any questions? Please contact me (Andy Callen) at A.Callen@salford.ac.uk .

Finding scores and sheet music

17 February 2017

Need to find scores and sheet music via the Library? Joanna tells you how.

Finding printed music in the Library

The Library holds over 2000 printed music items, most of which can be borrowed. They are shelved on the ground floor in Clifford Whitworth Library, or in our store.  Use Library Search to look up what you want and find its location. If an item is in store, use the Request option in Library Search and we will retrieve it for you.  It will usually be available for collection the following working day.

If we don’t have what you need, you can ask us to try to get it for you. We will buy it to add to our stock, or borrow it from another library, just remember it may take us a couple of weeks to get hold of it for you

 

Other places to look for scores-

Henry Watson Music Library

A huge collection of books and printed music held at Manchester Central Library. You can use the collection as a guest, or join the Library if you live in Manchester.

Finding printed music online

There are lots of useful websites providing access to scores.  However, please be aware that copyright law usually limits access to newer material – see the Copyright note below on UK Law.

IMSLP Petrucci Music Library

A great resource containing over 100,000 works, by over 14,000 composers. (Ignore or close the rather distracting ads towards the top of the page)

Choral Domain Public Library

Over 20,000 scores of choral and vocal works. You can search for scores by category (eg. madrigals), by composer, or by title.

Mutopia Project

Free sheet music arranged by composer, instrument or style.

Music Treasures Consortium

Brings together the collections of significant music libraries (mostly North American) including access to digital images of original (manuscript) scores.

Sheet Music Consortium

A research tool that allows you to search over 20 music collections and archives for sheet music. (When searching you may want to restrict your search to digitized sheet music, so your results only include music that is available online).

Music societies and other websites

Significant composers, or particular music genres often have an associated Societies or organisations whose websites can be a rich source of information, including access to scores. Examples include Web Library of Seventeenth Century Music, Chopin Online Catalog, Bach Digital, Broadside Ballads online

For traditional music it’s worth checking out ITMA (Irish Traditional Music Archive) and Full English (English folk songs, dance & customs archive).

Guides to finding scores & sheet music

Yale University Library has an excellent guide to finding scores online, that is well worth exploring, although it has a North American focus.

The Free Sheet Music Guide outlines how to get hold of music to play in all sorts of genres, including pop and rock. (But please be aware of copyright restrictions).

 

Copyright note

UK copyright law provides protection to a work for 70 years from the death of the author/composer. (For works with more than one author/composer the protection applies for 70 years from the death of the last surviving creator).  UK law also protects the “typographical arrangement” (the publishers version of the work) for 25 years.

There is excellent advice and guidance for Musicians regarding copyright at http://copyrightuser.org/