Posts about: Business

Read prize winning research papers in the Library

26 May 2017

 

Emerald logo

TWO research papers written by academics at Salford Business School have won ‘outstanding paper’ in the annual Emerald Network Awards for Excellence.  The Awards are now in their 24th year and were established to celebrate and reward the outstanding contributions of authors and reviewers to scholarly research.

The criteria used to judge the awards are based on six areas that inform the development of our products: internationality; diversity; support for scholarly research; encouragement of applied research (impact); commitment to high quality scholarship; and a desire to ensure reader, author and customer experience is the best it can be.

The winning papers were written by Dr Kevin Kane and Dr Marie Griffiths & Dr Gordon Fletcher.

Photo of Sue

Sue is blogging about prize winning research papers.

The papers are:

Djekic, I., Kane, K., Tomic, N., Kalogianni, E., Zamioudi, L., Rocha, A., & Pacheco, R. (2016). Cross-cultural consumer perceptions of service quality in restaurants. Nutrition and Food Science, 46(6), 827-843.

and

Fletcher, G., Griffiths, M., Greenhill, A., & McLean, R. (2016). The social supply chain and the future high street. Supply Chain Management,21(1), 78-91.

Salford University students have access to these and many more prize winning research papers via the Emerald Insight database.

Sign into Library Search  with your network username and password.

Click on the databases tab in the menu bar.

Click on E.

Select Emerald Insight.

Link into the database.

Picture of Library search screen

Pre-packed bread is toast according to a new Mintel survey

19 May 2017
Mintel infograpgh summarising British Lifestyles Report

Mintel, 2017.

There is an article in The Guardian today  today summarising the new Mintel British Lifestyle Report 2017.  Salford University students have access to this via Library Search. Sign in, click on the Databases link in the menu bar.  Click on M and link into the Mintel database.  A search for British Lifestyle will give you access to the full report.

Photos of Sue, the Business Librarian

Sue introduces the British Lifestyles Report.

Read about the economy, the people, the consumers’ response to the EU referendum, concerns for the NHS, Leisure and entertainment pursuits, sources of happiness and much more.  Key consumer findings include:

  • 48% of bottled water drinkers/buyers say concerns over sugar have prompted them to switch to bottled water in place of other drink.
  • 70% of 16-24-year-old men use conditioner, whilst 34% use hair treatments.
  • Compared with 2014, there was a 7-percentage point decline in hair removal from the underarms, and a 6-percentage point decline in hair removal from the legs, by 16-24-year-old women in 2016.
  • 24% of music convert and festival-goers would be very interested in being able to book a delivery of takeaway food to their tent at a music festival.
  • 39% of nightclubbers aged 18-24 are interested in using an app to order drinks while at a venue.

The CDs and DVDs in Clifford Whitworth Library have moved!

16 May 2017
Andy Callen

Andy tells you about the new location for audio-visual resources in the Library.

 

Our CDs and DVDs are now in a much better and more obvious location – on Level 2 of Clifford Whitworth Library, just in front of the link bridge to the Level 2 Extension. This means that they are now very close to the Arts and Media bookstock in the Extension. Please remember though that they are not just for Arts & Media use – there are non-fiction DVDs relevant to many subject areas in the collection. Also you may wish to borrow feature films or music CDs for your own entertainment – most items here are available to borrow.

Exams… preparation is the key!

24 April 2017
Tracy Breheny

Tracy tells you how to find past exam papers to help with your exam preparation.

Got exams coming up?  Looking over past exam papers can be really useful when preparing for an exam.   The Library has a collection of past exam papers which are all available electronically.

To find past exam papers, you need to:

  1. Go to our past exam paper webpage here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/research/exam-papers
  2. Type in a couple of keywords to limit your search; often words from the module title bring back useful results.
  3. You will then be presented with a list of past exam papers we have access to that match your search. When you find the one you would like to look at, click on the title and you will be able to open it.
  4. If you are off-campus, you will be requested to sign in with your network username and password to view them.

If you have any problem accessing past exam papers, please contact your Academic Support Librarian for further help: http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/help/academic-support

There is also lots of help with exam preparation and revision tecniques available on our Skills for Learning webpage here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/skills-for-learning/home/assessment-revision-and-exams so take a look!

Good luck with your exams!

Top Revision Tips

17 April 2017

If you have exams coming up in the next month or so, you might be thinking about how to get the best from your revision.

  1. Time! When is/are your exam(s)? Look at your calendar and block out any times you know you can’t revise because you’re at a wedding / in lectures / working / abseiling down the Eiffel Tower. How much time do you have left? Revision tends to work best in small chunks, so try to plan some little-and-often revision slots.
  2. Reward yourself! You need breaks, and you need to do something enjoyable to give your brain time to recover from all that revision. Plan some treats, quiet time off or nights out with friends so that you have chance to relax as well as study.
  3. Don’t just highlight! Highlighting and re-reading chunks of information probably won’t help it to sink in. Do something ‘active’ with your notes so that you can understand and process the information: rewrite it in different words, draw diagrams, discuss the topic with someone or tell the goldfish everything you know about it.
  4. Use past papers! If you have access to past papers, use them. They will help you to become familiar with the kinds of questions you’ll be asked, the wording, the length of answer required and so on.
  5. It’s not just a memory test… Exams are about demonstrating understanding of a topic and applying it to a question or situation, not just regurgitating facts. Think about how the things you’re revising would be used in practice or real life.

…and if you need something to take your mind off all that revision, have a look at Lynne’s lovely poem from this time last year!

Alexander Street Video – great resource for all subject areas

11 April 2017
Andy Callen

Andy describes how Alexander Street Video might be a useful audio-visual resource for you.

Do you need to get hold of video material for your study or teaching, but it’s not on Box of Broadcasts or in the Library’s DVD collection?

Try Alexander Street Video, an online collection of non-fiction video material for educational use, potentially useful across all subject areas. It includes:

  • News clips from ITN
  • Instructional videos for teachers
  • Over 1,000 films on psychology and counselling
  • Numerous documentary films on artists and designers.

Access Alexander Street Video from the Databases link on Library Search, OR directly from search.alexanderstreet.com. Your Network username and password are required.

Any questions? Contact me at mailto:A.Callen@salford.ac.uk.

Do you know how to eSubmit your work?

3 April 2017
Amy Pearson

Amy points out handy resources to help you with e-Submission

Turnitin is used for the e-submission of your assignments. It is an online tool that you use to upload your work so that it can be marked by your tutor. You access Turnitin from Blackboard.

Important things you need to know about submitting your work for marking

  1. Use the correct naming convention for your files – your school may specify a particular format.
  2. Submit your completed assignment to the correct, FINAL submissions folder when it is ready for marking. Work submitted mistakenly to the DRAFT folder at this stage will not be marked.
  3. When you submit work for marking, you are accepting the submission declaration.
  4. Keep copies of email receipts from Turnitin as proof of submission.
  5. Check the file size. Files must be less than 40Mb. Contact your lecturer if your file is greater than 40Mb.
  6. Use an accepted file type. File types accepted are: MS Word, WordPerfect, PostScript, PDF, HTML, RTF or plain text. You can ask at The Library for help if you are not sure about a file type. For non text-based assessments (e.g. audio/video, etc.) your tutor may use the Blackboard Assignment Tool.

If you are unsure how to use Turnitin we have videos and guidance on the Skills for Learning website.

Planning and writing your assignment – your 5 steps to essay success!

20 March 2017
Amy Pearson

This time of year is all about assignments. Amy has shared the Skills for Learning 5 steps to essay success!

It’s that time of year again when deadlines are looming so we thought we’d share with you our 5 steps to essay success.

  • Step 1: Analyse and Plan
  • Step 2: Search and Evaluate
  • Step 3: Read and Make Notes
  • Step 4: Write your Essay
  • Step 5: Review and Submit

Read on to learn more about each step!

 

 

 

Step 1: Analyse and PlanStep 1: Analyse and Plan

When you are given a question or task to complete you need to make sure that you understand what you are being asked to do and then plan how you will approach it. If you don’t answer the question being set you are more likely to get a low mark. With this in mind, the first step to essay success is to ANALYSE and PLAN. This involves analysing your task, making a plan and identifying useful words that describe your topic. You need to make sure that you pay attention to the instructions you have been given, be clear about the topic you have been asked to explore and any restrictions to the scope of your answer.


Step 2: Search and EvaluateStep 2: Search and Evaluate

Next you need to search for information and evaluate the usefulness of what you find. You need to think about what you already know and where you could search for information. A useful way of evaluating sources is to ask yourself these questions:
1. How up-to-date is the information? Is it still CURRENT?
2. Is this information source going to help me write my essay? Is it RELEVANT to my topic?
3. Is this “the right sort” of information – is it suitable for academic purposes? Is the author an expert in this subject area? Is the information reliable and ACCURATE?
4. Why has this information been written? What is its PURPOSE? Is there any bias I need to take account of?


Step 3: Read and Make NotesStep 3: Read and Make Notes

Now you have your materials together, it’s time to start getting the information that you need from them. There are different ways to approach this task depending on what you are reading. If it is books then you might want to start by looking at the chapter headings to decide which will be most useful. If it is a journal article then it is a good idea to read the abstract first as this help you decide whether it is worth reading in detail. Next you need to read the introduction as this will tell you about the main argument of the article. Read the conclusion next for a summary of the main ideas and finally if you still think it is relevant you may want to read the rest in detail. Make sure you annotate and summarise as you read.

 


Step 4: Write your EssayStep 4: Write your Essay

By now you should have a good idea about how you are going to answer the question. It is a good idea to re-visit your plan as it may have changed as a result of all the research and reading you have done! Give some thought to how you will structure your essay – it will need an introduction, a main body and a conclusion. The introduction tells the reader how you will answer the question. The main body is the ideas and analysis to support your argument, it is your opportunity to critically analyse the topic. Finally, the conclusion tells the reader how you have answered the question. Don’t forget to paraphrase, summarise and reference correctly as you write.

 


Step 5: Review and SubmitStep 5: Review and submit

Leave plenty of time to proofread your work paying particular attention to spelling, grammar, the question, word count and references and citations. When you are happy with your essay and confident that you have done your best to answer the question you can submit it.

 

 


Learn more

  1. Have a look at our 5 Steps to Essay Success online resource for more detail about each step.
  2. Read our study guides:
    – Writing your assignment
    – Reading and note making
    – Spelling and apostrophes
    – Proof Reading
  3. Book on to the Planning and Writing your Assignment workshop

LS:N – reminder of a great resource in Design

20 February 2017
Andy Callen

Read why Andy thinks LS:N is a great electronic resource.

Just wanted to remind you about the excellent electronic resource for all Design subjects, LS:N Global. LS:N is a trend prediction database that complements the use of WGSN (for Fashion) and Mintel (general business reports). It is extremely useful for business information and analysis, it has up-to-date and easily readable articles that can inform your written work, and great illustrations to inspire your creative work. LS:N is also potentially very useful for other subject areas such as Business and Management.

It’s the kind of database that is best explored by clicking on all its links, but particularly recommended are:

  • The Search function if you’re looking for a particular topic; there are also Filters to limit your search further. Try a search for youth to get results on youth fashion and the importance of youth trends in influencing design.
  • The Trends link for the consumer trends that drive innovation and change in design.
  • Inform for the opinions of industry experts, which would be especially useful for your assignments.
  • There is a Glossary at the bottom of the screen that gives you definitions for the terms used in the articles.

You access LS:N from www.lsnglobal.com  or from the A-Z list in Databases, from Library Search (the Library Catalogue). Please note you will need your Network username and password to access it off campus.

Any questions? Please contact me (Andy Callen) at A.Callen@salford.ac.uk .

Find your library books easily using ‘Locate’!

30 January 2017

Not sure where to find a book you need?  You can now find out exactly where your library book is located using our ‘Locate’ tab.

First of all, look for resources in Library Search and when you find a book you would like to find, click on the title:

Book search in Library Search

 

See if copies are avaiable, and if they are click on the ‘Locate’ tab:

Locate tab.

 

You will then be shown a map with the location of your book highlighted, so you know exactly where to find it!

 

Map for book location.

 

Want to learn more?  Take a look at ou short video which explains how to find books in the library: http://media.salford.ac.uk/Play/5421/