Posts about: Sociology, Criminology and Social Policy

Alexander Street Video – great resource for all subject areas

11 April 2017
Andy Callen

Andy describes how Alexander Street Video might be a useful audio-visual resource for you.

Do you need to get hold of video material for your study or teaching, but it’s not on Box of Broadcasts or in the Library’s DVD collection?

Try Alexander Street Video, an online collection of non-fiction video material for educational use, potentially useful across all subject areas. It includes:

  • News clips from ITN
  • Instructional videos for teachers
  • Over 1,000 films on psychology and counselling
  • Numerous documentary films on artists and designers.

Access Alexander Street Video from the Databases link on Library Search, OR directly from search.alexanderstreet.com. Your Network username and password are required.

Any questions? Contact me at mailto:A.Callen@salford.ac.uk.

Do you know how to eSubmit your work?

3 April 2017
Amy Pearson

Amy points out handy resources to help you with e-Submission

Turnitin is used for the e-submission of your assignments. It is an online tool that you use to upload your work so that it can be marked by your tutor. You access Turnitin from Blackboard.

Important things you need to know about submitting your work for marking

  1. Use the correct naming convention for your files – your school may specify a particular format.
  2. Submit your completed assignment to the correct, FINAL submissions folder when it is ready for marking. Work submitted mistakenly to the DRAFT folder at this stage will not be marked.
  3. When you submit work for marking, you are accepting the submission declaration.
  4. Keep copies of email receipts from Turnitin as proof of submission.
  5. Check the file size. Files must be less than 40Mb. Contact your lecturer if your file is greater than 40Mb.
  6. Use an accepted file type. File types accepted are: MS Word, WordPerfect, PostScript, PDF, HTML, RTF or plain text. You can ask at The Library for help if you are not sure about a file type. For non text-based assessments (e.g. audio/video, etc.) your tutor may use the Blackboard Assignment Tool.

If you are unsure how to use Turnitin we have videos and guidance on the Skills for Learning website.

Planning and writing your assignment – your 5 steps to essay success!

20 March 2017
Amy Pearson

This time of year is all about assignments. Amy has shared the Skills for Learning 5 steps to essay success!

It’s that time of year again when deadlines are looming so we thought we’d share with you our 5 steps to essay success.

  • Step 1: Analyse and Plan
  • Step 2: Search and Evaluate
  • Step 3: Read and Make Notes
  • Step 4: Write your Essay
  • Step 5: Review and Submit

Read on to learn more about each step!

 

 

 

Step 1: Analyse and PlanStep 1: Analyse and Plan

When you are given a question or task to complete you need to make sure that you understand what you are being asked to do and then plan how you will approach it. If you don’t answer the question being set you are more likely to get a low mark. With this in mind, the first step to essay success is to ANALYSE and PLAN. This involves analysing your task, making a plan and identifying useful words that describe your topic. You need to make sure that you pay attention to the instructions you have been given, be clear about the topic you have been asked to explore and any restrictions to the scope of your answer.


Step 2: Search and EvaluateStep 2: Search and Evaluate

Next you need to search for information and evaluate the usefulness of what you find. You need to think about what you already know and where you could search for information. A useful way of evaluating sources is to ask yourself these questions:
1. How up-to-date is the information? Is it still CURRENT?
2. Is this information source going to help me write my essay? Is it RELEVANT to my topic?
3. Is this “the right sort” of information – is it suitable for academic purposes? Is the author an expert in this subject area? Is the information reliable and ACCURATE?
4. Why has this information been written? What is its PURPOSE? Is there any bias I need to take account of?


Step 3: Read and Make NotesStep 3: Read and Make Notes

Now you have your materials together, it’s time to start getting the information that you need from them. There are different ways to approach this task depending on what you are reading. If it is books then you might want to start by looking at the chapter headings to decide which will be most useful. If it is a journal article then it is a good idea to read the abstract first as this help you decide whether it is worth reading in detail. Next you need to read the introduction as this will tell you about the main argument of the article. Read the conclusion next for a summary of the main ideas and finally if you still think it is relevant you may want to read the rest in detail. Make sure you annotate and summarise as you read.

 


Step 4: Write your EssayStep 4: Write your Essay

By now you should have a good idea about how you are going to answer the question. It is a good idea to re-visit your plan as it may have changed as a result of all the research and reading you have done! Give some thought to how you will structure your essay – it will need an introduction, a main body and a conclusion. The introduction tells the reader how you will answer the question. The main body is the ideas and analysis to support your argument, it is your opportunity to critically analyse the topic. Finally, the conclusion tells the reader how you have answered the question. Don’t forget to paraphrase, summarise and reference correctly as you write.

 


Step 5: Review and SubmitStep 5: Review and submit

Leave plenty of time to proofread your work paying particular attention to spelling, grammar, the question, word count and references and citations. When you are happy with your essay and confident that you have done your best to answer the question you can submit it.

 

 


Learn more

  1. Have a look at our 5 Steps to Essay Success online resource for more detail about each step.
  2. Read our study guides:
    – Writing your assignment
    – Reading and note making
    – Spelling and apostrophes
    – Proof Reading
  3. Book on to the Planning and Writing your Assignment workshop

Find your library books easily using ‘Locate’!

30 January 2017

Not sure where to find a book you need?  You can now find out exactly where your library book is located using our ‘Locate’ tab.

First of all, look for resources in Library Search and when you find a book you would like to find, click on the title:

Book search in Library Search

 

See if copies are avaiable, and if they are click on the ‘Locate’ tab:

Locate tab.

 

You will then be shown a map with the location of your book highlighted, so you know exactly where to find it!

 

Map for book location.

 

Want to learn more?  Take a look at ou short video which explains how to find books in the library: http://media.salford.ac.uk/Play/5421/

Have you tried Box of Broadcasts?

10 January 2017

bob

Students/ researchers/ teaching staff, if you’re looking for audio-visual resources for your research, need something visual to illustrate a presentation, or want to make clip of a television programme to include in a lecture, look no further than Box of Broadcasts (or BoB for short). BoB is an electronic resource for playing back and recording tv and radio programmes for educational purposes. You can access it from the Databases link on SOLAR, then choose Box of Broadcasts from the A-Z list; or from http://www.learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand. You’ll need your Network username and password to access it. You can link to it from PowerPoint, Word or BlackBoard, and you can now label your own clips. It is useful across all subject areas, and is a great resource for watching feature films if we don’t have a particular film in the Library’s DVD collection.

BoB is fairly intuitive to use at a basic level, but please see our guide if you need further help.

Library Resources for Sociology and Criminology Students

9 September 2016

The library subscribes to a number of databases which specialise in your subject area. They are not available freely via the web, so you won’t be able to find the resources we have here by using Google. They give you access to quality, up to date, peer-reviewed material such as journal articles, case studies and research papers.

To begin with, you may want to search for books using SOLAR library search. If you want to do an in-depth search for journals relating to a particular topic you might find it easier to search within a subject database.

It’s a good idea to familiarise yourself with these databases and learn how to use them. They’re a great source of information and will be useful throughout your time at Salford.

Sociology and Criminology Databases

For the full list of Sociology databases that the library subscribes to, click here.

For Criminology, click here.

Alternatively, follow the steps shown in the screenshots below.

 

Resources

From the library website, click on ‘Resources’ at the top of the page, and select either Sociology or Criminology from the dropdown menu.

crim

 

After selecting a database, click on ‘link to Database’ to proceed.  If you’re off campus, you will be prompted to log in using your University of Salford network username (e.g. ABC123) and password.

 

routledge

 

Recommended Databases Include

 

ProQuest Social Science Database 

ProQuest Social Science Database is a definitive resource for those who need access to a variety of social science journals. The database includes over 1000 titles, with the majority available in full text. It covers core disciplines across the social sciences, featuring journals from over 50 countries.

You can read more information in this blog post and watch a video guide here

 

Oxford Handbooks Online (Criminology and Criminal Justice)

These handbooks contain over 300 articles written by leading scholars, which evaluate the current thinking on criminology and criminal justice topics and make an original argument about the future direction of the debate.

We have access to more than 400 essays and articles, on topics such as:

  • Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Crime and Public Policy
  • Criminological Theory
  • Police and Policing

You can read more information about Oxford Handbooks and how to search the database, in this blog post:

 

Routledge Handbooks Online

This resource brings together the world’s leading scholars to provide cutting-edge overviews of classic and current research and future trends in the Social Sciences and Humanities, while at the same time providing an authoritative guide to theory and method, the key sub-disciplines, and the primary debates of today. You can read more information in this blog post

 

Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology Online

A resource giving instant access to the most authoritative and up-to-date scholarship in the field of sociology. The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology is the reference for students, researchers, librarians,  and academics in the field. It brings together specially commissioned entries written and edited by an international team of the world’s best scholars and teachers with over 1800 entries.

 

Academic Search Premier

Designed specifically for academic institutions, Academic Search Premier is a multidisciplinary full text database containing full text for more than 4,600 journals, including nearly 3,900 peer-reviewed titles. It is part of the EBSCO platform.

The following video from the library demonstrates how to carry out a search using EBSCO databases and is designed for Health & Social Care students.

 

 

JSTOR

JSTOR provides access to quality academic journals, books, and primary sources in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Primary sources include select monographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, letters, oral histories, government documents and more.

 

Help and Support

If you’re having any problems accessing these resources or would like any advice on how to search for information, you contact your Academic Support Librarian, Matt Adams on m.adams1@salford.ac.uk or 0161 2952110.

Library Resources for Social Policy Students

9 September 2016

The library subscribes to a number of databases which specialise in your subject area. They are not available freely via the web, so you won’t be able to find the resources we have here by using Google. They give you access to quality, up to date, peer-reviewed material such as journal articles, case studies and research papers.

To begin with, you may want to search for books using SOLAR library search. If you want to do an in-depth search for journals relating to a particular topic you might find it easier to search within a subject database.

It’s a good idea to familiarise yourself with these databases and learn how to use them. They’re a great source of information and will be useful throughout your time at Salford.

 

Social Policy Databases

To see the full list of subject databases for Social Policy, click here.

Or, follow the instructions shown in the screenshots below.

 

Resources

From the library website, click on ‘Resources’ at the top of the page, and select Social Policy from the dropdown menu.

 

Social Policy Resources

 

After selecting a database, click on ‘link to Database’ to proceed.  If you’re off campus, you will be prompted to log in using your University of Salford network username (e.g. ABC123) and password.

assia

 

Recommended Databases Include:

ProQuest Social Science Database 

ProQuest Social Science Database is a definitive resource for those who need access to a variety of social science journals. The database includes over 1000 titles, with the majority available in full text. It covers core disciplines across the social sciences, featuring journals from over 50 countries.

You can read more information in this blog post and watch a video guide here

 

Academic Search Premier

Designed specifically for academic institutions, Academic Search Premier is a multidisciplinary full text database containing full text for more than 4,600 journals, including nearly 3,900 peer-reviewed titles. It is part of the EBSCO platform.

The following video from the library demonstrates how to carry out a search using EBSCO databases and is designed for Health & Social Care students.

 

 

For more information, see EBSCO’s support page for Academic Support Premier here.

 

Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA)

This database is designed to meet the information needs of the caring professions, and spans the literature of health, social services, psychology, sociology, economics, politics, race relations and education. The database abstracts and indexes over 500 journals, from more than 16 countries.

 

Community Care Inform (Adults & Children)

Community Care Inform is an online comprehensive data source that contains a wealth of expert-written, practice related information, including guidance to key pieces of legislation, expert articles and practice guides.

You can find more information in this blog post and watch a video guide.

 

UK National Statistics

The official UK Statistics site – allows you to search the latest comprehensive range of official UK statistics and information about statistics as well as providing free access to a selection of recently released publications and press releases in downloadable formats.

 

Help and Support

If you’re having any problems accessing these resources or would like any advice on how to search for information, you contact your Academic Support Librarian, Matt Adams on m.adams1@salford.ac.uk or 0161 2952110.

Discover Allerton Learning Space

9 August 2016

 

 

Allertonentrance-300x199      13266

The Learning Space is conveniently located directly opposite the Mary Seacole Building, on the Frederick Road Campus. It’s an ideal space for students in the school of Health Sciences and the school of  Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences.

If you’re looking for somewhere to study, or just have a bit of spare time in between lectures, please pop in and have a look around.

Study space will be limited at Clifford Whitworth throughout the library development project, so make the most of the space and facilities available at Allerton! You can also borrow more books from Clifford Whitworth (up to 25 at a time for undergraduates or 35 for postgraduates and staff) and they will be automatically renewed, so there should be less need to visit the main library regularly.

The Learning Space is open from 8am until 9pm, Monday to Friday.

 

What is there?

Level 1

Here you’ll find the library enquiry desk, which is staffed from 9am – 5pm during the week. Staff can answer any queries you may have regarding your library or IT account and help you to access electronic resources. We also provide support for using printers, laptops, and any other library services.

There are 60 laptops available for students to borrow and use in the learning space. You will need your student ID card to borrow one – more information here.

Lockers are available next to the enquiry desk so that you can store your belongings and not have to carry everything around campus. Again, just make sure you have your ID card.

 

lockers

 

There is a seminar room which you can book online here. It has 2 PCs, a large screen monitor and space for 5 or 6 students. It’s great for group work, meetings or even a quiet spot to work on your own.

On level 1, you’ll also find a collection of Skills for Learning study guides, on topics such as critical analysis, referencing, reflective writing and IT skills.

 

Level 2

The main area on level 2 is a large open space for group and social study. There are a number of sofas, comfy armchairs and coffee tables along with more traditional study desks. There are flipcharts which you can use to prepare for presentations and plenty of power sockets to plug in your laptop. There are also print, copy and scan facilities on this floor, as well as height adjustable desks.

 

comfy

 

Extension

The Level 2 extension is a quiet study area with lots of space and natural light. There are some open access PCs and two study pods, as well as more height adjustable desks. Ask a member of staff if you’re not sure how to use these.

 

There is a second group study room with PC, large screen and whiteboard, which can be booked online.

 

seminar room

 

The PC suite in the extension (ALS203) is sometimes used as a training room but if not, you are free to use the PCs in here. The extension also has a silent study room.

 

silence

 

Level 4

We have a large open access PC suite with space for up to 100 students. You can always check whether PCs are available here or anywhere on campus by visiting this page

 

pc suite

 

Remember, from any PC you can access all the e-books and other electronic resources, such as journal articles, that the library subscribes to.

There are printers and a separate training room (ALS402), which is free to use when there are no classes.

Assistive Technology

We have an assistive technology room, which can be booked at the library enquiry desk. This room has a height adjustable desk and also has the following software installed:

  • Zoomtext
  • JAWS
  • Aspiration

 

Academic Support

If you’re a NMSWSS student, your Academic Support Librarian is based in the Allerton Learning Space. Do you know who it is? Or how we can help you? You can find our contact details, book an appointment, and read about the support that we offer here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disability Awareness Day 10th July 2016

5 July 2016

dad-logo

To coincide with Disability Awareness Day on 10th July this year, we would like to draw your attention to some services for students with disabilities and dyslexia.

The University has a Disability and Learner Support Team to provide help and advice http://www.askus.salford.ac.uk/disability

My Study Bar is available on all networked open access pcs, containing software to help you with reading and study skills.

Inspiration mind-mapping software can be used to help you to plan your assignments; this is available on many of the University’s open access pcs.

For more details of the software available, see http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/help/accessibility and choose Computing.

And of course your Academic Support Librarians can help you with finding suitable books, journal articles and electronic resources to help with your assignments, as well as help with Referencing; to find the Librarian for your subject area go to http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/help/academic-support .

 

 

 

Oxford Handbooks Online

5 July 2016

oxford

 

Did you know that the Library subscribes to the Criminology and Criminal Justice section of Oxford Handbooks Online? They are a great resource for Sociology and Criminology students here at Salford.

These handbooks contain over 400 articles written by leading scholars, which evaluate the current thinking on criminology and criminal justice topics and make original arguments. The Oxford Handbooks are one of the most successful and cited series within scholarly publishing, containing in-depth, high-level articles by scholars at the top of their field.

You have access to more than 400 essays and articles, or can browse the contents of the following Oxford Handbooks:

 

  • Crime & Criminal Justicejustice
  • Crime and Public Policy
  • Crime Prevention
  • Criminological Theory
  • Ethnicity, Crime and Immigration
  • Gender, Sex and Crime
  • Juvenile Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Organized Crime
  • Police and Policing
  • Sentencing and Corrections
  • White Collar Crime

 

 

How to access Oxford Handbooks

You can access the database from here.

Or, to see the list of all databases available to you, go to this page and select Criminology or Sociology from the drop down menu.

Remember that if you are off campus, you will be asked to enter your network username and password.

 

Searching the Database

From the Oxford Handbooks homepage, select Criminology and Criminal Justice.

 

browse

 

You can search the database for content and refine your search using categories such as keywords, author or handbook title.

Alternatively, you can browse the collection of handbooks, or the articles and essays contained within them.

When you find something you want to read, you will have the option to either view online or download a PDF version.

Below is a video guide showing you how to search, view articles and find your way around the collection.