Posts tagged: databases

Alexander Street Video – great resource for all subject areas

11 April 2017
Andy Callen

Andy describes how Alexander Street Video might be a useful audio-visual resource for you.

Do you need to get hold of video material for your study or teaching, but it’s not on Box of Broadcasts or in the Library’s DVD collection?

Try Alexander Street Video, an online collection of non-fiction video material for educational use, potentially useful across all subject areas. It includes:

  • News clips from ITN
  • Instructional videos for teachers
  • Over 1,000 films on psychology and counselling
  • Numerous documentary films on artists and designers.

Access Alexander Street Video from the Databases link on Library Search, OR directly from search.alexanderstreet.com. Your Network username and password are required.

Any questions? Contact me at mailto:A.Callen@salford.ac.uk.

LS:N – reminder of a great resource in Design

20 February 2017
Andy Callen

Read why Andy thinks LS:N is a great electronic resource.

Just wanted to remind you about the excellent electronic resource for all Design subjects, LS:N Global. LS:N is a trend prediction database that complements the use of WGSN (for Fashion) and Mintel (general business reports). It is extremely useful for business information and analysis, it has up-to-date and easily readable articles that can inform your written work, and great illustrations to inspire your creative work. LS:N is also potentially very useful for other subject areas such as Business and Management.

It’s the kind of database that is best explored by clicking on all its links, but particularly recommended are:

  • The Search function if you’re looking for a particular topic; there are also Filters to limit your search further. Try a search for youth to get results on youth fashion and the importance of youth trends in influencing design.
  • The Trends link for the consumer trends that drive innovation and change in design.
  • Inform for the opinions of industry experts, which would be especially useful for your assignments.
  • There is a Glossary at the bottom of the screen that gives you definitions for the terms used in the articles.

You access LS:N from www.lsnglobal.com  or from the A-Z list in Databases, from Library Search (the Library Catalogue). Please note you will need your Network username and password to access it off campus.

Any questions? Please contact me (Andy Callen) at A.Callen@salford.ac.uk .

Important Changes to Ref Me

17 February 2017
Jen Earl

Jen wants to make you aware of changes to Ref Me.

It has just been announced that RefMe will be changing to Cite This For Me on February 28th 2017. Full details on this news can be found on the Ref Me website.

If you have a RefMe account you will still have access to your account and saved Reference lists until June 1st, 2017, but you will need to export them before this date or you will lose them.

If you want to create an account for Cite This For Me it will cost £6.99 a month but you are able to generate a reference list without creating an account. However without an account your reference list won’t be saved for future use.

There are a number of reference management tools on the market and Salford University’s supported solution is EndNote. This comes in a free online version and the full desktop software, which is available on open access PCs in the library. As well as storing all your bibliographic references, EndNote can find and store PDFs plus it integrates neatly with Word to insert and format references. If you’d like to find out more about EndNote please look at our videos and Endnote link.

Broadcast – keep up-to-date with the broadcasting industy

16 February 2017

Keep up-to-date with the broadcast industry with Joanna’s guide.

Looking for news, data, or commentary on the broadcast industry?  Broadcast is a weekly magazine (in print) and  online resource, providing material on all aspects of the media, including news, commissioning, analysis, opinion, interviews, platforms, production and ratings.

We keep the printed copy at the University Library at Media City, but you can use the online version from anywhere. So, if you want to get details of the next “reality” TV show, or trace the rise of Netflix as a media player, register for an account and get browsing.

Access to Broadcast – register for an account

The University pays a subscription to give all our staff and students get free access, but you still need to register to get a personal account.

Step 1

Go to the Broadcast page in Salford’s Library Search.

http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/access-to-e-resources/library-databases/broadcast/_nocache

 

 Step 2

Click the link to complete the online form to register.

On Campus – you will be taken straight to the form. Many of the fields won’t be relevant to you as a student.  Just pick an option and move to the next field.

Off Campus – you will be asked for your University username and password, then select Register and complete the registration form as above.

Using your account

Once you have registered, you can use your account to get full access

Always use the link (above) in Library Search, then make sure you are signed in

 

If you want to search for a particular issue or date – use the publication index

http://salford.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://www.broadcastnow.co.uk/publication-index/

 

Access hints and tips

You can find yourself being asked to pay for content, although you think you are signed in.

  • Check you are actually signed in. Your name should appear towards the top right-hand side of the screen.
  • Check you haven’t accidently opened another copy of Broadcast. Sign out of any previous copies.

 

Information sources for Journalism – useful databases

27 January 2017

Databases for Journalism students 

Library Search is a great way to start a search for information on a particular topic, but if you want to use a specialist database, we have a huge range of sources that can provide you with information.  The list below is just a small selection.

Databases

    • Academic Search Premier – general full text journal article resource, good for a wide range of subject areas.
    • Arts & Humanities Index – titles include both scholarly journals and selected trade and consumer titles relevant to applied arts and cultural studies. Subject strengths include music, theatre, film and cultural studies.
    • Broadcast – a weekly online (and print) magazine covering the UK TV and radio industry. Useful for broadcasting news, commissioning, analysis and opinion.
    • Box of Broadcasts – provides access to an archive of TV and radio programmes from UK broadcasters. Allows you to request recordings of programmes yet to be broadcast (from the next 7 days).
    • Business Source Premier –journal articles, reports and books on business topics
    • Communication & Mass Media Complete – covers all aspects of communications, including media technology and social impacts.
    • Performing Arts Periodicals database – journal articles on all aspects of artistic performance, including film and broadcasting.
    • Nexis – full text press articles from regional, national and international newspapers and magazines.
    • Web of Science – despite its name this is a very useful and comprehensive resource for all social science topics – often worth checking.
    • Public Information Onlinecontains information from the Westminster and the UK’s regional parliaments/assemblies, plus a range of non-parliamentary material.
    • Westlaw includes articles from legal journals. (Remember to select Journals before you search, unless you are also looking for other legal material.)

 

Historical sources

  • Periodicals Archive Online – collection of full text journal backfiles from 1891 to 2000; useful for providing access to older material.
  • British Pathe – digital news archive, enabling the viewing of Pathe news clips from 1896 to 1970. Useful for and documentary.

To identify other relevant databases and get guidance on searching for information in a particular subject area, check out the Subject Support – Skills for Learning

Have you tried Box of Broadcasts?

10 January 2017

bob

Students/ researchers/ teaching staff, if you’re looking for audio-visual resources for your research, need something visual to illustrate a presentation, or want to make clip of a television programme to include in a lecture, look no further than Box of Broadcasts (or BoB for short). BoB is an electronic resource for playing back and recording tv and radio programmes for educational purposes. You can access it from the Databases link on SOLAR, then choose Box of Broadcasts from the A-Z list; or from http://www.learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand. You’ll need your Network username and password to access it. You can link to it from PowerPoint, Word or BlackBoard, and you can now label your own clips. It is useful across all subject areas, and is a great resource for watching feature films if we don’t have a particular film in the Library’s DVD collection.

BoB is fairly intuitive to use at a basic level, but please see our guide if you need further help.

Goodbye Bankscope, hello Fitch Connect.

20 December 2016

The Library has subscribed to Fitch Connect as a replacement source of bank data for the obsolete Bankscope.  Fitch Connect provides

  • Coverage for over 30,000 global banks (active and inactive).
  • 19,000+ active bank financial statements with the most coverage of emerging and frontier markets
  • Up to 500 data items per bank for summary and in-depth analysis.
  • Timely coverage: Annual and interim financial statements for the largest 3,200 banks (by total assets) are collected within hours of filing availability.
  • Accuracy: Double verified financial data used by Fitch credit analysts.
  • Fitch current & historical ratings.

A username and password are required to use the database.  To request these, you must use your University of Salford e-mail account to contact emeaclientservices@fitchsolutions.com

Use the Screener menu to search for Banks using the name of the company or other criteria such as market sector, region or accounting standard.  The homepage has a collection of videos to help you get started.

Library Resources for Counselling and Psychotherapy Students

22 September 2016

The library subscribes to a number of databases which specialise in your subject area. They are not available freely via the web, so you won’t be able to find the resources we have here by using Google. They give you access to quality, up to date, peer-reviewed material such as journal articles, case studies and research papers.

To begin with, you may want to search for books using Library search. If you want to do an in-depth search for journals relating to a particular topic you might find it easier to search within a subject database.

It’s a good idea to familiarise yourself with these databases and learn how to use them. They’re a great source of information and will be useful throughout your time at Salford.

 

Key Databases

 

PsycINFO

PsycInfo covers the professional and academic literature in psychology and related disciplines, including medicine, psychiatry, nursing, sociology, pharmacology, physiology and linguistics. A detailed user guide is available here.

 

 Academic Search Premier/CINAHL

Designed specifically for academic institutions, Academic Search Premier and CINAHL are multi-disciplinary databases containing full text for more than 4,600 journals, including nearly 3,900 peer-reviewed titles. CINAHL stands for the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature…guides, videos etc. You can read more information about using these databases  here.

 

Science Direct

Science Direct contains over 25% of the world’s science, technology and medicine full text and bibliographic information. Students and staff at Salford can access hundreds of full text journals, and also thousands of e-Books published since 2011.

 

How to access Subject Databases

 

To see the full list of subject databases for Counselling and Psychotherapy click here

Or, from the library website, click on ‘Resources’ from the menu at the top of the page, as shown below.

 

Library Resources

Next, select Counselling and Psychotherapy from the dropdown menu. If you’re off campus, you will need to log in using your University of Salford network username (e.g. ABC123) and password.

 

Counselling and Psychotherapy databases

 

At this point you will see the full list of resources. After selecting a database, click on ‘link to database’ to proceed.

Presentation3

Help and Support

Are you having trouble accessing or logging in to any of these databases? Or would like some more information on how to use them? You can find the contact details for Jen, your Academic Support Librarian, here: j.a.earl@salford.ac.uk or telephone :0161 295 3972.

Library Resources for Midwifery Students

22 September 2016

The library subscribes to a number of databases which specialise in your subject area. They are not available freely via the web, so you won’t be able to find the resources we have here by using Google. They give you access to quality, up to date, peer-reviewed material such as journal articles, case studies and research papers.

To begin with, you may want to search for books using Library search. If you want to do an in-depth search for journals relating to a particular topic you might find it easier to search within a subject database.

It’s a good idea to familiarise yourself with these databases and learn how to use them. They’re a great source of information and will be useful throughout your time at Salford.

 

Key Databases

 

CINAHL

CINAHL stands for the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Designed specifically for academic institutions, it is a multi-disciplinary database of over 1200 peer reviewed midwifery and nursing journals and publications dating back to 1982. It is part of the EBSCO collection of databases. We have a number of user guides and support videos here.

 

Science Direct

Science Direct contains over 25% of the world’s science, technology and medicine full text and bibliographic information. Students and staff at Salford can access hundreds of full text journals, and also thousands of e-Books published since 2011.

 

Maternity and Infant Care

Maternity and Infant Care is an essential database for professionals involved in the care of women and infants. It contains over 120,000 references to journal articles from over 550 international English language journals, books, and grey literature relating to pregnancy, labour, birth, postnatal care, and neonatal care and the first year of an infant’s life.

Key topics include:

  • Sudden infant death and infant mortality
  • Neonatal care and intensive care
  • Antenatal health issues
  • Screening
  • Ethical and professional issues

 

Medline

MEDLINE provides authoritative medical information on medicine, nursing, dentistry, veterinary medicine, the health care system, pre-clinical sciences, and much more. Created by the National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE uses MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) indexing with tree, tree hierarchy, subheadings and explosion capabilities to search citations from over 4,800 current biomedical journals.

 

How to access

You can view the full list of recommended subject databases for Midwifery here.

Or, from the library website, click on ‘Resources’ from the menu at the top of the page, as shown below.

Presentation2

Next, select Midwifery from the dropdown menu. If you’re off campus, you will need to log in using your University of Salford network username (e.g. ABC123) and password.

 

mw

 

Here you will see the full list of resources. After selecting an option from the menu, you will be given more information about the chosen database. Click on ‘link to Database’ to proceed.

 

mw1

Help and Support

Are you having trouble accessing or logging in to any of these databases? Or would like some more information on how to use them? You can find the contact details for Jen, your Academic Support Librarian, here: j.a.earl@salford.ac.uk or telephone :0161295 3972.

 

Library Resources for Sociology and Criminology Students

9 September 2016

The library subscribes to a number of databases which specialise in your subject area. They are not available freely via the web, so you won’t be able to find the resources we have here by using Google. They give you access to quality, up to date, peer-reviewed material such as journal articles, case studies and research papers.

To begin with, you may want to search for books using SOLAR library search. If you want to do an in-depth search for journals relating to a particular topic you might find it easier to search within a subject database.

It’s a good idea to familiarise yourself with these databases and learn how to use them. They’re a great source of information and will be useful throughout your time at Salford.

Sociology and Criminology Databases

For the full list of Sociology databases that the library subscribes to, click here.

For Criminology, click here.

Alternatively, follow the steps shown in the screenshots below.

 

Resources

From the library website, click on ‘Resources’ at the top of the page, and select either Sociology or Criminology from the dropdown menu.

crim

 

After selecting a database, click on ‘link to Database’ to proceed.  If you’re off campus, you will be prompted to log in using your University of Salford network username (e.g. ABC123) and password.

 

routledge

 

Recommended Databases Include

 

ProQuest Social Science Database 

ProQuest Social Science Database is a definitive resource for those who need access to a variety of social science journals. The database includes over 1000 titles, with the majority available in full text. It covers core disciplines across the social sciences, featuring journals from over 50 countries.

You can read more information in this blog post and watch a video guide here

 

Oxford Handbooks Online (Criminology and Criminal Justice)

These handbooks contain over 300 articles written by leading scholars, which evaluate the current thinking on criminology and criminal justice topics and make an original argument about the future direction of the debate.

We have access to more than 400 essays and articles, on topics such as:

  • Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Crime and Public Policy
  • Criminological Theory
  • Police and Policing

You can read more information about Oxford Handbooks and how to search the database, in this blog post:

 

Routledge Handbooks Online

This resource brings together the world’s leading scholars to provide cutting-edge overviews of classic and current research and future trends in the Social Sciences and Humanities, while at the same time providing an authoritative guide to theory and method, the key sub-disciplines, and the primary debates of today. You can read more information in this blog post

 

Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology Online

A resource giving instant access to the most authoritative and up-to-date scholarship in the field of sociology. The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology is the reference for students, researchers, librarians,  and academics in the field. It brings together specially commissioned entries written and edited by an international team of the world’s best scholars and teachers with over 1800 entries.

 

Academic Search Premier

Designed specifically for academic institutions, Academic Search Premier is a multidisciplinary full text database containing full text for more than 4,600 journals, including nearly 3,900 peer-reviewed titles. It is part of the EBSCO platform.

The following video from the library demonstrates how to carry out a search using EBSCO databases and is designed for Health & Social Care students.

 

 

JSTOR

JSTOR provides access to quality academic journals, books, and primary sources in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Primary sources include select monographs, pamphlets, manuscripts, letters, oral histories, government documents and more.

 

Help and Support

If you’re having any problems accessing these resources or would like any advice on how to search for information, you contact your Academic Support Librarian, Matt Adams on m.adams1@salford.ac.uk or 0161 2952110.