Posts tagged: Internet searching

Introducing the University of Salford App Store

19 April 2017
Nicola Sales

Nicola links you to information about the new University App Store

We’re excited to announce the launch of a brand new University of Salford app store.  There are many apps which can help you with your studies from accessing and organising the information your need, managing your time, preparing for exams, participating in online activities during classes, creating content for your assignments or improving your health and well being to help you with your studies.

There are so many available that the University has brought the most popular apps used at the University of Salford by staff and students into one place so you can quickly and easily search for, and download, the apps that you want.

Check out the app store today to find useful apps to support you with your learning .

You can visit the app store here.

 

Obstetrics & Gynaecology Podcasts

30 March 2017
Jen Earl

Interested in hearing from some key speakers in midwifery? Jen’s found some great up-to-date podcasts for you.

Interested in listening to some up-to-date podcasts about areas of Obs and Gynae such as: mental health and abortion; FGM, community work and lots more? The websites below provide open access to clinically-oriented podcasts and audio recordings, delivering a broad mix of lectures and interviews and conversations and commentary. The content on these sites can be listened to online or downloaded.

Have a listen at these podcast sites delivered by key experts in the field.

Podcast Sites

The site also has blogs in lots of different fields such as Nursing, Medical Imaging and Orthopaedics.

Create. Imagine the possibilities.

20 January 2017

create

Welcome to the final day of national Bring Your Own Device for Learning Week. Here at Salford we are offering a short online course to help you make the most of your mobile device, as well as on campus activities all week.

Day five

Today’s theme is creating – in particular how to use quizzes and surveys in your teaching and learning. Feel free to pop along to Mary Seacole, room 136, between 12:00 and 13:00 to join in.

A great way to explore learning is through ‘making’ – meaning how you can use devices and applications to develop original and meaningful outputs as an individual or within groups. There are so many ways you can do this; here are some we’ve come across:

Creating presentations
HaikuDeck
Prezi

Word clouds
Wordle
Tagul
worditout

Creating stories
Story Jumper
Storify

Films
Vimeo
Vine

 

For more apps, check out this creating shelf.

 

Thanks for participating this week. Don’t forget the twitter chat this evening, between 20:00 and 21:00 (UK time) to share what you’ve learned. Check out: #byod4lchat

 

 

Want to get your device set up for learning? Try our online guide

Need some human help? Turn up with your device at Clifford Whitworth library, first floor, between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help you get started.

 

Collaborate. Share the load.

19 January 2017

collaborate

Welcome to day 4 of national Bring Your Own Device for Learning Week. Here at Salford we are offering a short online course to help you make the most of your mobile device, as well as on campus activities all week. There’s no need to book, just follow the link below and participate as much or as little as you like.

Day four

Today’s theme is collaborating – how to work more effectively and crowdsourcing content using online collaborative tools. Come along to Maxwell, room 819, between 13:00 and 14:00 to find out more.

These apps can help you to work with others in a number of ways:

Video conferencing
Skype
Google+
Blackboard collaborate

File sharing
Evernote
Onedrive
Dropbox

Group work
Trello

Idea generating
Padlet
lino

 

For more apps, check out this collaborating shelf.

Don’t forget the twitter chat this evening, between 20:00 and 21:00 (UK time) to share your experiences so far. Check out: #byod4lchat

Can’t join in but want to get your device set up for learning? Try our online guide

Need some human help? Turn up with your device at Clifford Whitworth library, first floor, between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help you get started.

 

 

Connect with your Communities

16 January 2017

connect

Welcome to the first day of national Bring Your Own Device for Learning week. Here at Salford we’re offering students and staff the chance to participate in a free, online course to get the most out of your mobile device. There’s no need to book, just follow the link below and participate as much or as little as you like.

Day One

Today’s theme is connect so we’re exploring how to use social media tools more effectively to connect with your learning community.

To start, why not get on Twitter and follow Skills for Learning @skillupUS and the library @TheLibraryUoS?
Then join the Skills for Learning Facebook group to keep up-to-date.

There’s a whole host of apps and sites you can use to connect with others – have a look at some of them.

Every evening this week there’s a twitter chat  between 20:00 and 21:00 (UK time) for everyone participating in this course to share your experiences. Check out: #byod4lchat

  • Want to set up your device for learning?  Our online guide will help.
  • Need some human help? Take your device to Clifford Whitworth library, first floor, between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help you get started.

 

 

 

Bring Your Own Device for Learning (BYOD4L)

8 January 2016
Are you feeling like you’re not getting the most out of your mobile technology?

Getting a shiny new device for Christmas or have one lying around?

Do you want some help with how to use it in your studies?

help waving

 

 

Then Bring Your Own Device for Learning (BYOD4L) week may be for you!

Starting on 11th January 2016 (for 5 days), this short course looks at how you can make the most of your smart device (tablet/phone/laptop) through short 10 minute activities and additional resources. The course will enable you to connect with peers and learn within a wider community.

There is no requirement to join in every activity, the decision of how much time you wish to spend on this is entirely up to you. During the week there will be activities and a competition around the University so keep your eyes and ears open!

Twitter:  #BYOD4L

At Salford we are celebrating by letting you know what we have available for you so you can make the most of your laptop, tablet or phone to help you with your studies.

Have a look at our Get started pages to help set up your device.

 

Aaaaahhh???? Don’t know much other than how to switch it on? Come and see us: Clifford Whitworth library has a special support desk http://www.its.salford.ac.uk/dropin/ available between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help get you started.

IT desk

Community Care Inform- new resource for Social Work

28 January 2015

Community Care Inform

University staff and students now have access to Community Care Inform : Adults, as well as the Children site.

CC Inform Adults provides the same kind of information as the Children site, but with a focus on issues more pertinent to the social care of adults :

  • Guidance to key pieces of legislation
  • Expert articles
  • Practice guides

Access to Community Care Inform : Adults is currently by username and password (ie. not the same as the Children site)

You can find the username and password you need to access this new service here

‘Appy Christmas!

17 December 2014

The end of term is nearly here and the festive decorations are up, so the Library wanted to wish you a Happy ‘Appy Christmas.

appblogAs a gift to you, we’ve bought together a selection of useful apps which could help with any New Years resolutions you may be making for 2015. As an added gift they are all free!

Dreaming of being more organized?

Wunderlust, Trello or Evernote may help.

Wunderlust: Voted MacApp of the Year 2013, this useful app will help you organize your to-do lists, errands and even track and share your shopping list.

Trello: Working together on a project? Trello may help you stop long email threads and get rid of a pile of sticky notes. Trello lets you see everything about your project in a single glance.

Evernote: lets you keep track of ideas, thoughts, notes, from short one liners to lengthy texts. Evernote provides you with the workspace you may need.

Determined to keep up to date with the news but don’t want to visit numerous websites?

Try Feedly.

This handy app lets you track numerous news feeds and websites in one place. You no longer need to visit multiple websites, you can ensure you’ve got all the latest news you want from all the sources you need in one place.

Wishing to make managing your references and online reading easier?

Refme could be what you need. The RefME app will help you quickly assemble a list of references for a particular assignment.

If you find something online you want to read but you want to save it till later, try putting it in your pocket.

 

We hope you enjoy time off over the holidays but we know you may have work to do. For those of you with exams in January then ExamTime is another gift to you to help you capture your revision notes.

Finally, its not actually an app but if you want to follow Father Christmas’s journey around the world on Christmas Eve, its don’t miss out on the NORAD Santa Tracker.

Merry Christmas and an ‘Appy New Year to you!

Image courtesy of Cesar Poyatos flicker.com https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

Peer Review. What’s it all about?

29 October 2014

You may see or have been told to look for journals and journal articles  which are ‘peer reviewed’. But what does that mean? Peer review, also known as refereeing, is a collaborative process that means articles submitted to a to a journal are evaluated and by independent experts within the same field of research- their ‘peers’.

They evaluate and assess articles and provide authors with feedback to improve their work and provides valuable information to the editor to assess the paper’s suitability for publication in the journal.

Peer review can help to alert authors of any gaps in their research and also should ensure their work is original and meets any relevant ethics standards.

Many databases (such as Academic Search Premier) do give you a way to limit your results to peer –reviewed journals whereas others, (such as Medline) don’t need to as the majority (99%) of their articles are always peer reviewed.

 

SOLAR often indicates it like this:

peer review

 

 

 

If you would like to know more about peer review, watch this short video extract with the lovely Brian Cox- you will need to log in to view this with your network username and password:

http://bobnational.net/record/172833

Tips for evaluating websites

21 August 2014

web searchingAre you using information from websites in your research and wondering how you can tell if it’s a good resource to use?  If so, there are a number of checks you can run  through when evaluating a website which will tell you if it’s a reliable and trustworthy resource suitable for your academic work.

 

Firstly, ask yourself a couple of questions:

Is the website from a credible source?

Does the website help advance your argument?

Is it relevant to your topic?

Then, run a few checks when reviewing the website…

  • Check the source of the information (You can often look at the domain name for some help with this; does it have an .edu, .ac.uk or a .gov domain name for example?)
  • Check when the website was last updated (Is it recent?  Does it even have a date?  If not, you need to be cautious about using it)
  • Check the author out (Is there an authors name attached to it?  Do you recognize the author as an expert in the field? Remember, an author can be a company or an organization as well as an individual person.  again, if there is no author evident you need to be cautious about using it)
  • Check the content and look for any possible bias (Is the author trying to promote, publicise or sell anything?  Is the website heavily biased towards one side of an argument?  If so, take this into account when using it in your work)

These short checks should help you to evaluate a website and will assist you when deciding how reliable a website is.

Finally, don’t forget to reference anything you use in your academic work that you have found on the web!