Posts tagged: research

Read prize winning research papers in the Library

26 May 2017

 

Emerald logo

TWO research papers written by academics at Salford Business School have won ‘outstanding paper’ in the annual Emerald Network Awards for Excellence.  The Awards are now in their 24th year and were established to celebrate and reward the outstanding contributions of authors and reviewers to scholarly research.

The criteria used to judge the awards are based on six areas that inform the development of our products: internationality; diversity; support for scholarly research; encouragement of applied research (impact); commitment to high quality scholarship; and a desire to ensure reader, author and customer experience is the best it can be.

The winning papers were written by Dr Kevin Kane and Dr Marie Griffiths & Dr Gordon Fletcher.

Photo of Sue

Sue is blogging about prize winning research papers.

The papers are:

Djekic, I., Kane, K., Tomic, N., Kalogianni, E., Zamioudi, L., Rocha, A., & Pacheco, R. (2016). Cross-cultural consumer perceptions of service quality in restaurants. Nutrition and Food Science, 46(6), 827-843.

and

Fletcher, G., Griffiths, M., Greenhill, A., & McLean, R. (2016). The social supply chain and the future high street. Supply Chain Management,21(1), 78-91.

Salford University students have access to these and many more prize winning research papers via the Emerald Insight database.

Sign into Library Search  with your network username and password.

Click on the databases tab in the menu bar.

Click on E.

Select Emerald Insight.

Link into the database.

Picture of Library search screen

Important Changes to Ref Me

17 February 2017
Jen Earl

Jen wants to make you aware of changes to Ref Me.

It has just been announced that RefMe will be changing to Cite This For Me on February 28th 2017. Full details on this news can be found on the Ref Me website.

If you have a RefMe account you will still have access to your account and saved Reference lists until June 1st, 2017, but you will need to export them before this date or you will lose them.

If you want to create an account for Cite This For Me it will cost £6.99 a month but you are able to generate a reference list without creating an account. However without an account your reference list won’t be saved for future use.

There are a number of reference management tools on the market and Salford University’s supported solution is EndNote. This comes in a free online version and the full desktop software, which is available on open access PCs in the library. As well as storing all your bibliographic references, EndNote can find and store PDFs plus it integrates neatly with Word to insert and format references. If you’d like to find out more about EndNote please look at our videos and Endnote link.

Information sources for Journalism – useful databases

27 January 2017

Databases for Journalism students 

Library Search is a great way to start a search for information on a particular topic, but if you want to use a specialist database, we have a huge range of sources that can provide you with information.  The list below is just a small selection.

Databases

    • Academic Search Premier – general full text journal article resource, good for a wide range of subject areas.
    • Arts & Humanities Index – titles include both scholarly journals and selected trade and consumer titles relevant to applied arts and cultural studies. Subject strengths include music, theatre, film and cultural studies.
    • Broadcast – a weekly online (and print) magazine covering the UK TV and radio industry. Useful for broadcasting news, commissioning, analysis and opinion.
    • Box of Broadcasts – provides access to an archive of TV and radio programmes from UK broadcasters. Allows you to request recordings of programmes yet to be broadcast (from the next 7 days).
    • Business Source Premier –journal articles, reports and books on business topics
    • Communication & Mass Media Complete – covers all aspects of communications, including media technology and social impacts.
    • Performing Arts Periodicals database – journal articles on all aspects of artistic performance, including film and broadcasting.
    • Nexis – full text press articles from regional, national and international newspapers and magazines.
    • Web of Science – despite its name this is a very useful and comprehensive resource for all social science topics – often worth checking.
    • Public Information Onlinecontains information from the Westminster and the UK’s regional parliaments/assemblies, plus a range of non-parliamentary material.
    • Westlaw includes articles from legal journals. (Remember to select Journals before you search, unless you are also looking for other legal material.)

 

Historical sources

  • Periodicals Archive Online – collection of full text journal backfiles from 1891 to 2000; useful for providing access to older material.
  • British Pathe – digital news archive, enabling the viewing of Pathe news clips from 1896 to 1970. Useful for and documentary.

To identify other relevant databases and get guidance on searching for information in a particular subject area, check out the Subject Support – Skills for Learning

Curate. Don’t drown in a sea of information. Organize.

18 January 2017

curate

Welcome to day 3 of national Bring Your Own Device for Learning Week. Here at Salford we are offering a short online course to help you make the most of your mobile device, as well as on campus activities all week. There’s no need to book, just follow the link below and participate as much or as little as you like.

Day three

Today’s theme is curating – how to stay on top of the latest developments in your area, and how you can organise your documents, ideas and notes. Drop in to Mary Seacole, room 187, between 12:00 and 13:00 today to find out more.

There’s so much information, it can become overwhelming. Why not explore ways of using your devices and applications to filter, store, organise and manage information effectively?

Note taking
Evernote
One Note

Document reader
Feedly (helps you keep on top of news and literature in your field)

Bookmarking
Pocket (save webpages to view later, even without an internet connection)

Referencing
RefMe
Mendleley

For more apps, check out this curating shelf.

Don’t forget the twitter chat this evening, between 20:00 and 21:00 (UK time) to share your experiences so far. Check out: #byod4lchat

Can’t join in but want to get your device set up for learning? Try our online guide

Need some human help? Turn up with your device at Clifford Whitworth library, first floor, between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help you get started.

Connect with your Communities

16 January 2017

connect

Welcome to the first day of national Bring Your Own Device for Learning week. Here at Salford we’re offering students and staff the chance to participate in a free, online course to get the most out of your mobile device. There’s no need to book, just follow the link below and participate as much or as little as you like.

Day One

Today’s theme is connect so we’re exploring how to use social media tools more effectively to connect with your learning community.

To start, why not get on Twitter and follow Skills for Learning @skillupUS and the library @TheLibraryUoS?
Then join the Skills for Learning Facebook group to keep up-to-date.

There’s a whole host of apps and sites you can use to connect with others – have a look at some of them.

Every evening this week there’s a twitter chat  between 20:00 and 21:00 (UK time) for everyone participating in this course to share your experiences. Check out: #byod4lchat

  • Want to set up your device for learning?  Our online guide will help.
  • Need some human help? Take your device to Clifford Whitworth library, first floor, between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help you get started.

 

 

 

Goodbye Bankscope, hello Fitch Connect.

20 December 2016

The Library has subscribed to Fitch Connect as a replacement source of bank data for the obsolete Bankscope.  Fitch Connect provides

  • Coverage for over 30,000 global banks (active and inactive).
  • 19,000+ active bank financial statements with the most coverage of emerging and frontier markets
  • Up to 500 data items per bank for summary and in-depth analysis.
  • Timely coverage: Annual and interim financial statements for the largest 3,200 banks (by total assets) are collected within hours of filing availability.
  • Accuracy: Double verified financial data used by Fitch credit analysts.
  • Fitch current & historical ratings.

A username and password are required to use the database.  To request these, you must use your University of Salford e-mail account to contact emeaclientservices@fitchsolutions.com

Use the Screener menu to search for Banks using the name of the company or other criteria such as market sector, region or accounting standard.  The homepage has a collection of videos to help you get started.

Web of Science Advanced Searching

20 July 2016

Are you a PhD or research student who needs to know more about advanced searching in Web of Science?

This video is perfect for explaining truncation, combining keywords with ‘and, or and not’ and gives a great overview of proximity searching of keywords.

 

Figure it out with DataStream

23 June 2016

DataStream is a database for financial and economic research data from Thomson Reuters.  It contains current and historical data on stocks, indices, bonds, funds, futures, options, interest rates, commodities, and economic indicators with coverage back to the 1960s.   PGR students can use DataStream in the PGR room in the Maxwell Building.  It is also available on the first floor of Clifford Whitworth where it can be used by all students – see the map below for the location:

Map showing location of DataStream

To carry out a simple search in DataStream:

  • Open Excel & click the DataStream tab on the tool bar.
  • Click on the Time Series Request option – this allows you to request data for a specific time period.

DataStream 1Capture

  • The following box will appear:

DataStream 2Capture

  • Use the Find Series button to search for the code for the company, commodity, index etc. you are interested in.
  • Use the Datatypes button to search for the type of data you are interested in – if you leave this box blank the default code P (price) will be used.
  • Use the Start and End Date boxes to specify a time period.
  • In the Options section choose which items you want to display e.g. column headings, currency etc.  Make sure that you do not have Auto Refresh selected – this function will try to update your spreadsheet  whenever you open it.

This guide is just a starting point – a collection of video guides are available on the Thomson Reuters site.

If you need to find a specific piece of data use the Thomson Reuters Help desk which is available via the Contact Us link on the DataStream tool bar:

DataStream 3Capture

Use your University of Salford email address in the Corporate Email box:

DataStream 4Capture

 

Literature Reviews

13 June 2016

Many of you will be trying to tackle a literature review as part of your summer project or Masters dissertation.

It is important to remember the purpose of a literature review when you are approaching it. The review is not purely a list or summary of previous research in your chosen area, but also an opportunity to critically assess this previous research. This assessment is often then used to identify how your project/dissertation adds to the body of knowledge already out there.

When you are reading sources for the literature review, the kinds of questions you should be asking yourself are:

  • Could the research in this source be biased in some way?
  • Has there been a major change in the area since this research was written? Does it need to be updated?
  • Could the methods used for research in this source be improved?

The Skills for Learning website has more useful information which you can download on Critical Analysis of a Journal Article and Reviewing Literature and Paraphrasing.

Bring Your Own Device for Learning (BYOD4L)

8 January 2016
Are you feeling like you’re not getting the most out of your mobile technology?

Getting a shiny new device for Christmas or have one lying around?

Do you want some help with how to use it in your studies?

help waving

 

 

Then Bring Your Own Device for Learning (BYOD4L) week may be for you!

Starting on 11th January 2016 (for 5 days), this short course looks at how you can make the most of your smart device (tablet/phone/laptop) through short 10 minute activities and additional resources. The course will enable you to connect with peers and learn within a wider community.

There is no requirement to join in every activity, the decision of how much time you wish to spend on this is entirely up to you. During the week there will be activities and a competition around the University so keep your eyes and ears open!

Twitter:  #BYOD4L

At Salford we are celebrating by letting you know what we have available for you so you can make the most of your laptop, tablet or phone to help you with your studies.

Have a look at our Get started pages to help set up your device.

 

Aaaaahhh???? Don’t know much other than how to switch it on? Come and see us: Clifford Whitworth library has a special support desk http://www.its.salford.ac.uk/dropin/ available between 12 and 2, Monday to Friday. No need to book, pop along with your device and we’ll help get you started.

IT desk