Posts about: Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit

Nowhere safe to stay: the dangers of sleeping rough

21 October 2016

This report from St Mungo’s, presents new evidence on the dangers of rough sleeping and the poor service people often receive from council housing options teams. It is based on 40 interviews with St Mungo’s clients and highlights how some asked for help but were turned away or even instructed to sleep rough in order to access services. It makes a number of recommendations – including for MPs and government to support the Homelessness Reduction Bill. It is a policy report containing original research that may be of interest to campaigners, policy professionals and the press. Katy Jones, Research Fellow from the Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU) at the University of Salford was involved in the data collection phase of this study.

To download a copy of the report please visit St Mungo’s website

‘Fuel Poverty: Telling the Story’ Fuel Poverty Research Network

20 September 2016

The Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU) are hosting the second meeting of the Fuel Poverty Research Network (FPRN) on 1st November 2016, 9.30am – 4.30pm at The University of Salford’s MediaCityUK campus.

With the theme ‘Fuel Poverty: Telling the Story’ this interactive session will look at creative ways of understanding and sharing experiences of fuel poverty and learning from some inspiring projects from Greater Manchester and beyond. It is an opportunity to learn about new and creative ways of communicating research and maximising impact, and to be part of a growing network working on this important issue. Researchers, policymakers, government and local authority officers, charities and industry are very welcome. There will plenty of opportunities for participation and networking.

For further information and details on how to register, please visit our online registration page. Places are limited and registration closes on 25th October. For further information please contact Vicki Morris on v.j.morris@salford.ac.uk, 0161 295 2140 or download FPRN Booking Information (PDF).

 

60 seconds with Lisa Scullion, Reader in Social Policy and Associate Director of SHUSU

19 June 2016

losa1.What is your position within the School?

I am Reader in Social Policy and Associate Director of the Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU).

2.How long have you worked in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford? 

Myself and my SHUSU colleagues moved into the School about 18 months ago. However, I have worked at SHUSU for ten years having previously been based within the School of Environment and Life Sciences and the College of Science and Technology.

3.Which building are you based in?

Allerton Building.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

Over the last ten years I have been leading and delivering research that focuses on the social welfare needs of a range of marginalised populations. Moving into the School has enabled me to work more closely with colleagues who are more aligned to my areas of interest/discipline. But more importantly, the School recognises the value of research and I am proud to be able to contribute to that.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

When I first moved into the School I was eight months pregnant. I was only in my new office a couple of weeks before finishing for maternity leave. But I will never forget how welcoming my new colleagues in the Social Work Directorate were. In fact, after only knowing me a couple of weeks they sent me off on maternity leave with a lovely card, flowers and chocolates.

6.What is your biggest dream?

As I mentioned before, my research focuses on marginalised populations or those at the ‘sharp end’ of policy. So, my biggest dream (workwise) is that my research will actually have an impact on the lives of those on the margins.

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

When I’m not working I spend my time with my husband and our two boys, aged one and three. I am not sure relaxing is the right word, but I love my time with my boys. I also occasionally go running, and watch a lot of box sets.

8.What was your first job?

Working in a greasy spoon café on Morecambe promenade.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

My promotion to Reader last year and taking on the role of Associate Director at SHUSU.

10.What would make your job easier?

A lot of the work we do at SHUSU requires us to respond quickly to opportunities or to work to tight deadlines, so a bit more flexibility and responsiveness in terms of University systems/processes would  be helpful. Plus more hours in the day (and less meetings)?

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Make the most of every opportunity (at work and at home).

Different Paths, Shared Future – Refugee Week 20-26 June 2016

4 June 2016
From Salford to Calais

From Salford to Calais

The Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU) are delighted to introduce a series of exciting events taking place at the University of Salford to celebrate Refugee Week.

Tuesday 21st June 2016

Opening of the Calais Photography Exhibition
10.00 – 10.30
Robert Powell Theatre (Frederick Road Campus)
This exhibition displays photographs taken during the University of Salford’s trip to the ‘Jungle’ in Calais as part of the ‘Salford to Calais’ project. At this opening event, the photographer and members of the ‘Salford to Calais’ team will share their experiences of visiting the ‘Jungle’ and the resilience and community spirit that they witnessed during their time in Calais. More information about the exhibition and how to register for launch event can be found here.

Following the opening event, the exhibition will be on display all through Refugee Week in the Reception and on the Concourse (first floor) of the Allerton Building.

Tuesday 21st June 2016

‘Asylum Monologues’
10.30 – 12.00
Robert Powell Theatre (Frederick Road Campus)
‘Asylum Monologues’ is a theatre performance providing a first-hand account of the UK’s asylum system in the words of people who have experienced it. The script is performed by members of Actors for Human Rights, a campaigning project of Ice & Fire Theatre, which aims to give a voice to people affected by contemporary human rights issues. More information and how to register can be found here.

Thursday 23rd June 2016

Seminar: Challenging dominant narratives: Stories of women seeking asylum
Dr Kate Smith, University of Huddersfield
1.00 – 2.00

Room MS167/168, Mary Seacole Building

Kate Smith is a Research Fellow (asylum and migration) in the Centre for Applied Childhood, Youth and Family Research, at the University of Huddersfield. Drawing upon her ESRC funded research with women seeking asylum, this seminar will explore the stories of seventeen asylum seeking women, opening up a critical space that highlights the importance of resistive stories and enriches our understanding of the diversity of forms of resistance. More information and how to register can be found here.

Friday 24th June 2016

Understanding the Immigration Act 2016: Implications for community members and practitioners
10.00 am – 2.00
The Bryants Suite, Allerton Building (Frederick Road Campus)

Guest speakers from across the North West will discuss and debate the impact of the new Immigration Act 2016, focusing specifically on the potential legal, health, education and community implications. Speakers include Denise McDowell (Greater Manchester Immigration Aid Unit) and Rebecca Murray (Article 26). More information and how to register can be found here.

Join us to celebrate Refugee Week! 

#RefugeeweekSU

60 Sec With Prof Philip Brown Director of CARe & SHUSU

15 May 2016
Phil Brown

Prof. Philip Brown

1. What is your position within the School?

I’m Director of the Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy, Director of the Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit and Professor of Social Change.

2. How long have you worked in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford? 

I’ve been in the School for around 18 months now but I’ve just completed by 11th year at the University having previously worked in the School of Environment and Life Sciences and the College of Science and Technology.

3. Which building are you based in?

The Allerton Building.

4. Why did you choose to work within the School?

The School is one of the most successful places for research in the entire University. We have been the highest grossing research income generator and we have the best hit rate in terms of turning research bids into successful awards. The School has a really compelling story about the impact colleagues can make on the positive outcomes for people and society in terms of wellbeing. Both of these things are really important to me for providing the right conditions for us to spend our time undertaking and disseminating research that could change peoples’ lives for the better.

5. What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

That’s a really difficult one. The beauty of the work we do is rarely is there a day which repeats itself so new memories are being made all the time. It is really nice to see influential people discovering the University and the work in the School for the first time and taking that message back. As an example, we were fortunate to host David Orr who is Head of the National Housing Federation at an event last year which celebrated the achievements of some of our alumni. It was David’s first time visiting Salford and he was really impressed with the way we were approaching the interface between housing, health and social care. He’s returned twice since that first visit.

6.What is your biggest dream?

Personally running a sub 4 hour marathon would be nice. In terms of work I’d like to see the University at the table more regularly when international advances are being made in terms of knowledge generation around wellbeing and equality.

7. When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

I like to run, read, travel and devour box sets. We also have a small campervan called Wilf and we like to take it far and wide to watch the sun rise and set whenever we get a chance.

8. What was your first job?

Other than a paperround when I was 13. I worked in a packaging factory in Leeds for longer than I care to remember in order to afford to live my (very modest) undergraduate lifestyle. As a result I now cannot stand vanilla scented candles. This was followed by other illustrious positions as a delivery driver, bar staff, waiter, and strawberry picker.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

Getting to a point in my life where I have been able to work side by side with people I used to only know through reading their work.

10. What would make your job easier?

I think we need to trust people more. Too many decisions retreat back to the centre of the University and this can stifle creativity, innovation and responsiveness. If we can get a little more local control – with accountability – I think this would spark new forms of collaboration and new ideas. This is where I see a real role for the ICZ initiative.

11. Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Have a plan. Time flies so it’s really important to know what it is that you want to do with the time you have. As academics we remain privileged we are paid to read, express our views, find out about things that are interesting to us and debate with students and peers. If you know what it is that you enjoy or want to achieve or both, try and work out how you incorporate this into your academic work. But remember to enjoy your non-working time as well.

Hipster Business Review: a study into Greater Manchester based creative entrepreneurial start-ups

15 January 2016

In a collaboration with Salford Business School, SHUSU researchers are looking to interview the entrepreneurs and inspired minds behind creative, chic start-ups in Greater Manchester for a new study.

‘Hipster’ is a term that has been in use for many years, but in the UK it has recently become associated with the rise of an alternative type of entrepreneurialism often focused on art, design and crafts, specialist food and drink and niche digital services. ‘Hipster’ businesses are often set up and staffed by young, tech savvy men and women, generating local hubs of innovation and business ingenuity. For many, digital business models lie at the heart of their enterprise.

Read more…..

Professor Philip Brown appointed Director of Centre for Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences Research

10 November 2015

Phil Brown

Professor Philip Brown has been appointed Director for Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences Research at the University of Salford. In his new role, Philip will be responsible for operationalising the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences’ research plans, with a specific focus on projects, publications and professional development. He will also continue in his role as Director of the Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU).

Commenting on his new role, Philip said ‘This is an exciting time to be involved in research at the University of Salford. The School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work & Social Sciences is home to world-leading research across a number of fields. As well as obvious talent and expertise there is abundant enthusiasm and passion for making the research that is undertaken within the University matter for policy, people and place. I am proud to play a part in helping realise this ambition.’

Read more…..

SHUSU PhD Candidate to present at Roma Summit

9 November 2015

SHUSU PhD student, Liviu Dinu has been invited to speak at the Summit ‘Perspective from the ground: Opportunities for Roma Inclusion in the Western Balkans’. The summit, organised by Civil Rights Defenders, will be held 25-27th November in Pristina, Kosovo. Civil Rights Defenders is an independent expert organisation founded in Stockholm in 1982 with the aim of defending human rights, in particular people’s civil and political rights, while also supporting and empowering human rights defenders at risk.

Read more…..

SHUSU present empty homes research in Exeter

9 November 2015

Danielle Butler, PhD student and SHUSU Associate Member, presented her award winning research on empty homes last week to the South West Empty Homes Conference in Exeter.

SWEHF

Working in collaboration with the Greater Manchester Empty Homes Knowledge Transfer Partnership, Danielle undertook a study into the inertia of empty home owners. Her research, Understanding Inertia: presented an interpretive phenomenological analysis of the experiences of owning an empty home, received the Jonathan Sime Award recognising the contribution of her study to the field of people-environment research.

She presented her research to empty homes practitioners from across 26 local authorities. Danielle shared the stage with John Hughes from Tameside Council, who discussed the benefits of undertaking the Knowledge Transfer Partnership with SHUSU to address the phenomenon of empty homes.

Exeter City Council, who organised the Conference, thanked Danielle and John for contributing to the ‘best South West Empty Homes Forum in recent years.’

Dr Lisa Scullion and Dr Andrew Clark appointed Readers

4 November 2015

We’re delighted to announce SHUSU Members, Dr Lisa Scullion and Dr Andrew Clark have been promoted to Readers. Professor Philip Brown (Director of SHUSU) said “This is testament to the contribution Lisa and Andrew are making in their respective fields and the impact their research is having on some of the urban environments’ most challenging issues. A huge congratulations to both of them on this great achievement.”

Read more…..