Posts tagged: AHRC

Fifteen top tips for succes in applying for research funding

20 November 2013

Jennifer Roddis from Bournemouth University recently posted a really concise list of key principles for increasing your chances of getting research funding – this resonates very closely with our experiences. We are therefore re-producing them for your information and as a useful resource.

How can you increase your chances of being successful when applying for research funding? Here are a few ideas from an AHRC panel member (with thanks to AHRC and the panel member):

  1. Ensure the scheme and applicant are a good match. Funders won’t give millions of pounds to new researchers.
  2. Does the team include an appropriate mix of people? Someone should be able to cover all of the disciplines represented in the proposal, and individuals at a range of career stages should be included.
  3. Remember that the assessors will be both subject specialists (the reviewers) and generalists (panel members). The panel can be targeted through the lay summary.
  4. Use the subject area to define the research expertise of your reviewers. Stating that your research is in the field of philosophy when this is peripheral to the study may mean your reviewers are unfamiliar with your subject.
  5. Imagine your nightmare critic and pre-empt their criticisms; respond to these without being defensive, but without glossing over any problems.
  6. Make the link to the funder’s remit clear. If the panel need to discuss whether or not the project is within the funder’s remit, the project is unlikely to be funded.
  7. Allow time to prepare and write the application. Two months to prepare, and a full week to write the application is to be expected, and then costing, gaining internal approvals, etc. still need to follow. Successful applications may be useful as a model, but slavishly following them may not succeed as the funder’s objectives may have changed.
  8. The application should cohere as a whole, but not be too repetitive. Stick to the first or third person, ensure it is clear who is meant when you say ‘I’ and make sure your spelling and grammar are correct. If the funder offers guidance on headings for specific sections, use them.
  9. If the funder requires an impact statement, be modest and realistic, set specific goals and milestones and don’t over-inflate your claims.
  10. If your research involves human participants, there will be ethical considerations. If the project involves a collaboration, make it clear who will take the lead for ethical approvals and ongoing ethical considerations.
  11. It’s all in the detail: name which conferences you hope to present your work at and the journals in which you plan to publish. Explain how the publications differ, and detail which team members will work on each.
  12. When working out the costs, don’t skimp on hours. If you have fractional research assistants, explain why. If you are planning to publish a manuscript, allow time for revision. Don’t make the project cheap just for the sake of it, but make sure it is well considered and achievable within the resources. The reach and significance of the project are more important than the overall budget.
  13. Detail monitoring arrangements for the project: who will monitor progress, within what institutional structures, will there be management or advisory boards and what is the reporting structure? For early career researchers, what monitoring, career development and mentoring will be in place?
  14. Use internal peer review services and talk to panellists or peer reviewers for your funder.
  15. Use your right to reply where funders allow. A critical review is not the end of your funding hopes, and a PI response can be used to elaborate on thoughts you didn’t have space for in the original application. Don’t be aggressive or defensive; it may be worth asking a colleague to read through your response to remove any emotional involvement. Also don’t repeat the positive comments; the panel will see these when they consider the application, and you can better use the space responding to misunderstandings or requests for further detail.

Source and author: Jennifer Roddis, Bournemouth University

See more here.

Latest Funding Opportunities Digest: 20th November 2013

20 November 2013

The following funding opportunities have recently been announced. Please follow the links for more information. 

UK Funders

Internal Funds

AHRC – Translating Cultures Innovation Grants

20 November 2013

Title

Translating Cultures Innovation Grants

Funder

AHRC

Deadline

6th March 2014

Value

£150,000-200,000

Aim

Projects will be expected to play a central role in the development of the Translating Cultures theme by making incisive and innovative contributions to the following six strategic questions:

How can research into languages and cultures anywhere in the world and at any time: 

1) Encourage engagement with the ways in which translation may be seen to be constitutive of cultures in their formation, projection and transformation?

2) Extend analysis of the ways in which translation serves as a form of transmission and circulation of ideas, ideologies and forms of knowledge between geographical locations, historical moments and cultural contexts?

3) Contribute to understanding the role of translation both in processes of artistic and literary creation, and as an active contributor in the development of new knowledge and understanding?

4) Enhance awareness of the importance of the spaces, contexts, practices, materials, actors and technologies of translation?

5) Develop understanding of the ethics of translation, in the light of a range of phenomena including globalization and digital communication?

6) Permit a closer interrogation of the politics and understanding of translation in a variety of public, private and voluntary bodies and their wider contexts?

‘Innovation’ in this context should be interpreted broadly and could apply, for example, to developing new insights in established areas, or new research methods or approaches, or developing new areas of enquiry, new types of outputs, new partnerships, and / or approaches to dissemination, etc.

Although it is recognised that proposals may address topics of relevance to multiple questions, applicants are required to identify the one strategic question to which they are responding most directly.

Length

18-24 months

Eligibility

Standard AHRC eligibility criteria apply

Details

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/Funding-Opportunities/Pages/Translating-Cultures-Innovation-Grants.aspx

AHRC – Science in Culture Innovation Awards

20 November 2013

Title

Science in Culture Innovation Awards

Funder

AHRC

Deadline

27th February 2014

Value

Up to £80,000

Aim

Successful proposals under the Innovation Awards call are expected to expand and explore the Science in Culture theme in new and innovative ways.  Proposals may address any aspect of the theme as outlined in the call document.

In the context of this call, innovation can take a number of forms:

  • Exploring new inter-disciplinary concepts, methodologies and approaches drawing on both the arts and humanities and the sciences
  • Developing reciprocal collaborations of a new nature or in new or emerging fields of collaborative enquiry between the arts and humanities and the sciences
  • Addressing innovative and inter-disciplinary research questions co-produced through dialogue between the arts and humanities and the sciences

Length

12 months

Eligibility

Standard AHRC eligibility criteria apply

Details

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/Funding-Opportunities/Research-funding/Themes/Science-in-Culture/Pages/Current-funding-opportunities.aspx

Latest Funding Opportunities Digest: 15th October 2013

15 October 2013

The following funding opportunities have recently been announced. Please follow the links for more information. 

UK Funders

EU Funders

International Funders

  • Humanitarian Innovation Fund – Small & Large Grants. Closing Date: 28th October 2013 (EoIs for the Large Grants)

Latest Funding Opportunities Digest: 30th September 2013

30 September 2013

The following funding opportunities have recently been announced. Please follow the links for more information.

UK Funders

 EU Funders 

  • EU – ERA-NET – Transnational Joint Call 2013. A total budget of approximately €33 million is available for projects lasting up to 36 months. Closing Date: 30th October 2013.

Internal Funds

  • University of Salford – VC’s Early Career Scholarships. £2,000 bursary, minimum research workload allocation and dedicated mentoring support. Closing Date: 31st October 2013.

Latest Funding Opportunities Digest: 13th September 2013

13 September 2013

The following funding opportunities have recently been announced. Please follow the links for more information.

UK Funders

  • AHRC – Design in Innovation: Research Development Fund. Up to £50,000 available for projects lasting up to 6 months and to be completed by October 2014. Closing Date: 31st October 2013.
  • AHRC – Seminar on ‘Engaging with Government’. Aimed at early-career researchers, course, accommodation and travel costs will be covered. Closing Date: 21st October 2013.
  • EPSRC – Research in the Wild: Internet of Things. A total of £3.5 million is available to fund approximately 10 projects, with duration of 18 months. Closing Date: 24th October 2013.
  • British Academy – BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grants. £500-£10,000 available for projects up to 24 months duration. Closing Date: 16th October 2013.
  • Royal Society – Research Grants. Aimed at early career scientists, up to £15,000 available for projects up to 12 months duration. Closing Date: 15th October 2013.
  • Royal Society – International Exchanges Scheme. Up to £12,000 available for up to 2 years. Closing Date: 15th October 2013.
  • Royal Society – Industry Fellowships. Salary costs and research expenses covered for fellowships lasting up to 2 years. Closing Date: 4th October 2013.
  • Leverhulme Trust – Research Fellowships. Aimed at experienced researchers, up to £45,000 available for fellowships lasting between 3-24 months. Closing Date: 7th November 2013.
  • Leverhulme Trust – International Academic Fellowships. For researchers wishing to spend time outside the UK, up to £30,000 available for fellowships lasting between 3-12 months. Closing Date: 7th November 2013.
  • Leverhulme Trust – Emeritus Fellowships. Aimed at retied academics, up to £22,000 available for fellowships lasting between 3-24 months. Closing Date: 6th February 2014.
  • Wellcome Trust – Sir Henry Dale Fellowships. Salary costs, research and travel expenses covered for fellowships lasting up to 5 years. Closing Date: 1st November 2013.
  • Wellcome Trust – Arts Awards. Up to £30,000 available for projects lasting up to 3 years. Closing Date: 1st November 2013.
  • TSB – Innovation Vouchers. Up to £5,000 available for SMEs to enable them to work with knowledge suppliers, including universities. Closing Date: Various deadlines.
  • Healthcare Infection Society – Small Research Grants. Up to £10,000 available. Closing Date: 1st February 2014.
  • Kay Kendall Leukaemia Fund – Project Grants. Grants available to support existing research projects/programmes. Closing Date: 28th February 2014.
  • British Society of Soil Science – Field Equipment Grant. Up to £1,000 available. Closing Date: 1st April 2014.

New agreement to simplify joint UK-US research applications

6 September 2013

 

 

 

 

Research Councils UK (RCUK) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the United States have entered into a new agreement designed to help support international research partnerships between the two countries.

The new two-way lead agency agreement enables a simplified and flexible process for researchers wishing to apply for UK-US collaborative research funding, using the usual systems and processes of the respective funding agencies.

The new agreement is first being piloted by the Social Behavioral and Economic Sciences Directorate of the NSF (SBE) in partnership with the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

One of the main goals of the agreement is to reduce the current barriers that exist to researchers with an international remit. Previously a researcher would have needed to submit separate proposals to their respective funding agencies with no guarantee both would take on the research. This two-way agreement overcomes this problem.

The agreement allows researchers to follow a familiar procedure to the ones they are used to. Proposals will go through the normal submission and assessment processes of the lead agency and, if selected for funding, the non-lead agency will agree to fund the research in their country.

It also allows the submission of joint proposals between US and UK researchers to either the NSF or one of the participating councils, depending on the balance of research and funds. The agency which the proposal is submitted to is considered the lead agency.

The process will be researcher led so they will decide whether their proposal is to be UK- or US-led. UK-led proposals will be submitted via the standard responsive mode calls of the respective Research Councils which are open year-round which allows researchers to decide when they want to submit.

Further information: Groundbreaking two-way lead agency pilot (ESRC website)

Funding Opportunities Digest – 6th September 2013

6 September 2013

The following funding opportunities have recently been announced. Please follow the links for more information.

UK Funders

  • AHRC – Care for the Future: Large Grants. Approximately two to four grants worth between £2 million and £4m over a period of between 36 and 60 months are available. Closing Date: 10 October 2013
  • AHRC – Collaborative Skills Development Grants. Funding of up to £60,000 for up to 18 months. Closing date: 19 September 2013
  • AHRC – Collaborative Skills Development Grants: Early Career Researchers. Funding of up to £5,000 for up to one year is available. Closing date: 19 September 2013
  • BBSRC – China Partnering Awards. Grants of up to £30,000 over a period of up to 4 years. Closing date: 27 November 2013
  • EPSRC – Energy Management in Non-Domestic Buildings. Funding of up to £500,000 for individual projects. Closing date: 3 October 2013 (Intention to Submit) / 5 November 2013 (Proposals)
  • ESRC/Research Grants Council of Hong Kong – Collaborative Projects Programme. The funding limit is set between £15,000 and £99,999 (at 100 per cent full economic cost; funded at 80 per cent) for UK element of the joint project. Closing date: 18 October 2013
  • TSB/MRC Biomedical Catalyst – Business-led Early Stage Award. Awards may last up to three years and receive up to £2.4 million in funding, with a funding proportion of 60 per cent of eligible project costs for SMEs. Closing date: 2 October 2013
  • TSB – Future Energy Management for Buildings. Projects expected to range in size between £300,000 – £1m, lasting for 1 -3 years. Closing date:  27 November 2013 (for Expressions of Interest)
  • The Royal Society – Paul Instrument Fund. Grants of up to £75,000 available. Closing date: 16 October 2013
  • Defra – Testing Innovative Approaches for Achieving Sustainable Behviours. Most projects expected to be small-scale, lasting between 12-18 months. Closing date: 25th September 2013 (for Expressions of Interest)
  • The Nuffield Foundation – Grants for Research & Innovation. Grants normally range from £10,000 to £250,000, although the majority are worth between £50,000 and £150,000. Closing date: 1 November 2013
  • The Health Foundation - Closing the Gap on Patient Safety Call. Projects will up to £450,000 in value. Closing date: 23 September 2013

European Funders