Posts by Joanna

Lights, camera, action.. information sources for film

9 April 2020

Finding films to watch

Those of you with subscriptions to Netflix, Disney, Sky etc. will have access to a huge number of mainstream films.  However, the Library also provides some excellent sources for films old and new, both mainstream and more alternative.

Box of Broadcasts – This is a treasure trove for film buffs.  It’s a vast collection of programmes broadcast on TV and radio over the past 20 years or more.  Many thousands of films have been aired on TV, and the recordings are available in this database.  This blog describes how to use Box of Broadcasts to find a particular film. read more

Want to watch a good film? – Try Box of Broadcasts

12 May 2017

Did you know that you have access to an enormous number of films via Box of Broadcasts?

By Joanna Wilson
Academic Support Librarian

Box of Broadcasts (often referred to as BoB), contains recordings of TV and radio programmes, including recordings of lots of films.

Whether you want to explore the work of a particular director, watch a film from your favourite genre, analyse a classic film, or just take a break from your studies, you can check whether a film is available to you via BoB.

Connecting to Box of Broadcasts –

Go via Library Search, which gives access to all the Library’s resources.

  • Connect to the University’s Library Search (via this link, or use Google by searching for Library Search Salford)
  • Sign in to Library Search with your network username and password
  • Type Box of Broadcasts in the search box.
  • Box of Broadcasts should be the first item in the results list. Click on the online access link.
  • If you haven’t used BoB before you will be asked to set up a profile – it’s quick and easy, but make sure you use your university email address.
  • read more

    Fake News

    7 April 2017

    Be a savvy news consumer – Joanna gives some useful reminders.

    Fake news has become a hot news topic! We all want our news to be accurate, truthful, and honest, so how do you sort out truth from lies, or identify exaggerated stories, or facts reported out of context?

    The simplest strategy is to make sure you get your news from a variety of sources – don’t get stuck in your own media “bubble”. Be critical and analyse any news you share on social media.  We all have a responsibility not to spread lies.

    There are no hard and fast rules, but here are some things to think about –

  • Beware sensational headlines. Not every shocking headline is associated with fake news – but it’s a warning sign.
  • Be very cautious about stories intended to prompt an extreme emotional response, particularly anger. Verify the story from other known, reliable sources.
  • Check whether other “mainstream” news sources are reporting the story.
  • Take a look at the domain name. Does it suggest a bias, or potential unreliability?
  • Check out the “About us” tab, or look at the contact details. Is the content attributable to a “real” person, or an identifiable organisation? Do they have a particular agenda? Look for more information about the author or organisation.
  • Look for supporting evidence. Use a fact checking site if appropriate (FullFact.org Factcheck.org, Politifact.com, Snopes.com etc). Follow up links to research studies, or data sources. Ask yourself if they are authoritative. Look for other reports about the same study. Remember fake news doesn’t have to be “made up”. Facts reported selectively can be dangerously misleading.
  • read more

    Finding scores and sheet music

    17 February 2017

    Need to find scores and sheet music via the Library? Joanna tells you how.

    Finding printed music in the Library

    The Library holds over 2000 printed music items, most of which can be borrowed. They are shelved on the top floor in Clifford Whitworth Library, or in our store.  Use

    Library Search read more

    Information sources for Journalism – useful databases

    27 January 2017

    Databases for Journalism students 

    Library Search is a great way to start a search for information on a particular topic, but if you want to use a specialist database, we have a huge range of sources that can provide you with information.  The list below is just a small selection.

    Databases

    • Academic Search Premier – general full text journal article resource, good for a wide range of subject areas.
    • Arts & Humanities Index – titles include both scholarly journals and selected trade and consumer titles relevant to applied arts and cultural studies. Subject strengths include music, theatre, film and cultural studies.
    • Broadcast – a weekly online (and print) magazine covering the UK TV and radio industry. Useful for broadcasting news, commissioning, analysis and opinion.
    • Box of Broadcasts – provides access to an archive of TV and radio programmes from UK broadcasters. Allows you to request recordings of programmes yet to be broadcast (from the next 7 days).
    • Business Source Premier –journal articles, reports and books on business topics
    • Communication & Mass Media Complete – covers all aspects of communications, including media technology and social impacts.
    • Performing Arts Periodicals database – journal articles on all aspects of artistic performance, including film and broadcasting.
    • Nexis – full text press articles from regional, national and international newspapers and magazines.
    • Web of Science – despite its name this is a very useful and comprehensive resource for all social science topics – often worth checking.
    • Public Information Onlinecontains information from the Westminster and the UK’s regional parliaments/assemblies, plus a range of non-parliamentary material.
    • Westlaw includes articles from legal journals. (Remember to select Journals before you search, unless you are also looking for other legal material.)
    • read more