Posts by Ebba

Email privacy

5 July 2018

Did you know that your email may not be private?

Google has recently confirmed that private Gmail messages can sometimes be read by staff at external companies. If you have a Gmail account, check out this video from the BBC on how to hide your Gmail account from prying eyes:

There are other times when your email communications may not be private. Find out more in these blogs:

Start protecting yourself
Change your behaviour
Hackers
Boost your digital security

Good habits to stay safe online at University and beyond

20 June 2018

As a student, you’ll rely heavily on technology to create and store your academic work. It’s important to take the correct steps to protect and secure this information.

This is the last in a series of 4 blog posts in which we’ve been examining how you can protect your digital privacy. (The first three were protecting your digital privacy; changing your online behaviour; and dealing with hackers .)

Most often, security issues arise because of the way people behave online.

So get into these good habits to stay safe online at University and beyond: read more

Your digital privacy: hackers

18 June 2018

Most people fear their email or social media accounts being hacked but don’t know about some simple steps to prevent this from happening.

Be aware: your digital privacy may be breached through hacking.

What you share by email or text may not be as private as you think. An email or text is like a letter that you send in the post. People shouldn’t read it, as they should respect your privacy, but someone could see it. These messages are transmitted from one device to another as a digital code, which can be scrambled, or encrypted, as it is sent. Your message goes first from the sender to a server and then to the recipient. In the process it’s possible for your message to seen by hackers or people who illegally access the code. Free public wifi sites are often not encrypted, so are not secure from hackers. Avoid them. (The University’s wifi is secure, however). read more

Change your behaviour to protect your privacy online

13 June 2018

The most common way for your privacy to be breached online isn’t an unknown hacker. It’s your own behaviour.

This is the second in a series of blog posts about how to protect yourself online. (Read the first one here.)

Your own or other people’s online behaviour can breach your privacy.

If you’ve ever walked away from a shared computer without logging out of social media accounts or email, you’ve left yourself open to a breach of privacy. It’s like leaving the door of your house wide open. read more

Your digital privacy: start protecting yourself

11 June 2018

We all expect a certain level of privacy when communicating online. However, you may have less privacy than you imagine. So how might your privacy be breached? And how can you protect yourself?

First up, remember this: some online communications are just not private.

Social media platforms are simply not private: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, for example, are fantastic platforms for communicating and collaborating. What you share will be seen by others and may be seen by many thousands or millions of other social media users, through sharing or screenshots, even if you delete your original post. Students can sometimes be shocked that a post on social media will be seen by others at all. read more

Finding pictures the legal way 3/3

26 June 2017

Welcome to the third in this series on searching for images the legal way. If you missed them, check out part one (using Google image search and Microsoft to find legal images), and part two (safe picture search engines).

Today we’re meeting (possibly) the best colour search engine in the world, also known as the Multicolr Search Engine from TinEye Labs. Use it to search for pictures by colour. This is a fantastic tool, especially if you’re trying to build a colour scheme for a visual piece of work. All the images have a creative commons licence, which means they are going to be fine to reuse in your academic and professional work. read more

Searching for pictures the legal way 2/3

23 June 2017

Welcome to part two of this series on searching for pictures the legal way. If you missed part one, it’s here. If you know how to do a Google search for an image that’s ‘licenced for reuse’ you’ve made a good start. But sometimes the results from Google alone can be disappointing.

Fortunately, there are many other search engines that are dedicated to finding free-to-use images that are licenced for reuse. My favourite is Pixabay – because it’s powerful and intuitive to use. But there are many others which are worth a try: read more

Finding pictures the legal way (1/3)

21 June 2017

When you’re looking for pictures to illustrate or enhance your academic work, how do you search? Do you ‘copy and paste’ from the internet, as a student recently told me? Or simply type your search term in that old reliable, Google?

Unless you’re careful, searching like this can contravene copyright law and potentially get you into legal trouble. Whenever you find an image through a regular Google search, there’s a good chance that it either:

  • has a license which forbids you to use it, or
  • has no license at all

Assuming that you didn’t ask for prior permission to use the content, it’s illegal to use it if either of these two cases applies. read more

Stampy’s Christmas Cake Caper

15 December 2015

Is YouTubing a career? Ask 24-year old Joseph Garrett, better known as Stampy, whose digital and online gaming skills have led him to enormous success through his YouTube channel. Here’s his first ever public lecture in front of a live audience (this video is available throughout December 2015 via the BBC iplayer).

stampy

How to access your F:drive from home

10 October 2015

Know you get a gigabyte of free and secure storage when you’re a student at the University of Salford? It’s otherwise known as your F: drive. You can access it from any networked PC around the University, and also from home – from anywhere in the world in fact, as long as you have reasonable internet connection. Here’s how to access it from home, and how to save work to it from home:

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