Posts about: Library Basics

Saving your work

12 February 2019

Did you know that, as a student, you get access to one gigabyte of personal storage space on our network (your F: drive) and one terabyte of space on OneDrive? That’s a lot of secure space to save all your assignments, and you can access them both on and off campus.

To find out more about the good (and not-so-good) places to save your work click the image below and have a look at our short tutorial.

Are you a new student, or perhaps you’d like a quick refresher? If so, you might like to have a look at some of the other information while you are there. read more

Need a study room? Book online!

11 February 2019

You can book Library study rooms online using The Library’s room booking software. You can access the software and book a room of your choice (if available) using the Library self-service room bookings icon on the desktop of all of our open access PCs, or by visiting our website and following the link.

You can book rooms in a number of locations, including:

  • Clifford Whitworth Library.
  • Chapman Building.
  • Allerton B’Hive.
  • Allerton Learning Space in Allerton Building.
  • read more

    Want books in the library? Ask your Library Champion!

    28 January 2019

    Tracy Breheny

    Tracy tells you how to make the most from the Library Champion Scheme.

    Are there new books, electronic books or DVDs you would like to see in the library?

    Do you think there are titles we need more copies of?

    If so, you can request books through your Library Champion!

    Each school has a pot of £5,000 allocated for book requests and a designated Library Champion who can be contacted when you would like to request books for the library.

    Find out more about the scheme from two of our Library Champions:

    You will need to include details about the items you would like us to order, including:

    • The title, author and ISBN number (this is the specific book number and can be found on Amazon’s website).
    • The year of publication (and edition if there is one).
    •  The number of copies you would like and the price.
    • The library you would like it for (Clifford Whitworth or Media City).

    You can also make suggestions for further library developments/services and offer feedback about the library to your Library Champion, who will then pass your comments to us and we will respond.  To find out more about your Library Champion and the scheme, take a look at our webpage here: http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/help/library-champions.

    Revision, exams and looking after yourself

    7 December 2018

    We all know that revising is tough. It is difficult to know where to start and very easy to get drawn into other things. Here are a few tips, tools and apps to help you ace your revision and exams!

  • Check out our revision tips
  • Learn how to improve your study concentration and cope with exam nerves
  • Have a look at our study guides on revision and exams
  • Access past exam papers. Have a look at Tracy’s blog post to learn how to do this.
  • Come to our Revision and Exam Techniques workshop on the 13th Dec 1-3 pm.
  • Don’t forget to live well for learning. Revision and exams can be stressful and time consuming. Make sure you find time for yourself!
  • read more

    Referencing: an introduction

    29 October 2018

    Anne introduces referencing.

    Even if you are still quite new to university you have probably already heard words like “referencing” and “citations” – and heard that they are VERY IMPORTANT.

    But what is referencing, and why do you need to do it?

    Research is a major part of university education, and it is expected that you will read, understand and discuss the writing of others. It is essential that you acknowledge what you have read to protect yourself against accusations of plagiarism, show the research you have done, and allow your tutors to identify your own ideas and understanding of your subject.

    This is what referencing means.

    To find out more, watch our Citing it Right video. Click the image to play.

    referencing-player

     
    Students on most taught courses at Salford are required to reference using the APA 6th style. There are links to PDF guides plus online examples on the Skills for Learning Referencing and Plagiarism pages.

    To learn more about referencing come to a workshop – and if you need more help you may book an appointment with your Subject Librarian or Study Skills Consultant.

    We want you to do well in your studies!

    Find articles more easily using Library Access

    16 August 2018

    Tracy Breheny

    Tracy introduces you to Library Access – the easier way to find articles!

    Library Access is a browser extension, or add-on, available for Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Safari.

    Why is it useful?

    Library Access makes it simpler to access articles, journals and databases, particularly when you are studying off campus. It automatically detects when you are on a site the Library provides a subscription to and prompts you to log in.

    If you visit a site which the Library doesn’t provide access to, Library Access will try and suggest an alternative route, including Open Access content.

    It will also automatically add ‘Findit@Salford’ links to sources found in Google Scholar.

    Find out more by watching this short video:

    Library Access video on YouTube

     

    How do I get it?

    Library Access is easy to install – just click on the download link and follow the instructions to add it to your browser.

    Once installed select “University of Salford” and it will automatically pop up when you are on a site the Library has a subscription for or alert you to alternative content.

    To find out more, take a look at our webpage.

    Please note:  You MUST have the most up-to-date version of your preferred browser for Library Access to work.  Please check this if you encounter any technical difficulties.

    If you have any questions about this, or would like to find out more, please contact The Library.

    Need maps for your research? Check out Digimap!

    3 August 2018

    Tracy Breheny

    Tracy talks about Digimap and all of the different types of maps you can get access to through Library Search.

    The Library has access to a collection of databases provided by Digimap.  These contain a variety of different maps which you can access using Library Search.  Our subscriptions include access to various different types of maps, scans, satellite images and land coverage information, and  can all be accessed online.

    We currently subscribe to the following Digimap collections:

    Digimap Environment

    Digimap Environment provides access to Land Cover Map data from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. This is a parcel-based classification of UK land cover derived from satellite images and digital cartography and gives land cover information for the entire UK. Land cover is based on UK Biodiversity Action Plan Broad Habitats.

    Help using it can be found here.

    Digimap Ordnance Survey

    This collection includes a variety of Ordnance Survey maps and licenced data.

    Help using it can be found here.

    Digimap Historic

    Historic Digimap provides access to the valuable historic Ordnance Survey map collection online. The maps included are digital scans of Ordnance Survey paper map sheets.

    The historic maps can be viewed online, printed and downloaded as images for use in image processing and GIS software.

    Help using it can be found here.

    Want further information?

    Digimap also has a blog which can be useful for keeping up-to-date with Digimap developments and new content.

    There is also a Digimap YouTube channel which contains lost of videos on using various components of the resource.

    How to use Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)…

    24 July 2018

    MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) is an organised list (or a controlled vocabulary) of medical and health care terms. You can use them like a thesaurus to identify new keywords and to find terms that are not commonly used or known. MeSH terms are best used in conjunction with your own keywords but remember that that a MeSH heading may not always be available for your topic.  This short video explains how to use MeSH in the Cinahl database.

    https://youtu.be/P5YXNpAA_eM

    Information sources for architecture-related subjects

    10 July 2018

    Tracy Breheny

    Tracy suggests some architecture-related information sources that you can use.

    Studying architecture or an architecture-related subject?  There are lots of sources of information you can use to help with your research.  All of these sources can be accessed via Library Search.

     

    Useful books include:

     

    Useful reference works include:

    Dictionaries

    Encyclopaedias

     

    Key journals include:

    • Abitare
    • Architect
    • Architecture Today
    • Architectural Review
    • Azure
    • Blueprint
    • Building Engineer
    • Building Magazine
    • Built Environment
    • Construction News
    • Design Intelligence
    • Detail
    • Domus
    • Dwell
    • El Croquis
    • Journal of Architecture
    • Journal of Architecture and Urbanism
    • L’Architecture d’aujourd’hui
    • Mark
    • Metropolis
    • Modulo
    • Urban Design

     

    Key databases include: 

    Academic Search Premier
    Alexander Street Press (academic videos)
    Archinet

    Architects’ Journal (AJ) read more

    Getting the most out of Google Scholar.

    22 May 2018

    Do you want to know how to link Google Scholar to Library Search, find the most recent papers or see how an idea has developed over time? Do you want to save papers to your Google Library or set up alerts for your research topic? The Library has written a handy FAQ that covers all this and more.Google scholar logo