Posts about: Computing, Science and Engineering

Find articles more easily using Library Access

21 January 2020
Tracy Breheny
Tracy introduces you to Library Access – the easier way to find articles!

Library Access is a browser extension, or add-on, available for Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Safari.

Why is it useful?

Library Access makes it simpler to access articles, journals and databases, particularly when you are studying off campus. It automatically detects when you are on a site the Library provides a subscription to and prompts you to log in.

If you visit a site which the Library doesn’t provide access to, Library Access will try and suggest an alternative route, including Open Access content.

It will also automatically add ‘Findit@Salford’ links to sources found in Google Scholar. read more

Specialist software library locations

25 October 2019

Tracy Breheny

Tracy shows you where to find specialist software and MACs in the Library

Clifford Whitworth Library contains a number of designated PCs with specialist software on them.

The PCs are labelled, indicating which ones have the software on, and are all available 24/7.

Specialist software available in Clifford Whitworth Library includes:

  • Autodesk BDS (the full suite)
  • AutoCAD (on all of the open access PCs in Clifford Whitworth Library)
  • Autodesk Revit  (on all of the open access PCs in Clifford Whitworth Library)
  • ChemSketch
  • Datastream
  • Estate Manager
  • Linux
  • Avid Sibelius
  • Wind

To help you find them, we have some maps showing where the PCs are located:

Clifford Whitworth Library software locations

We also have MACs available in the Library, should you need them:

Clifford Whitworth Library software MAC location

If you have any problems locating software or the MACs in the Library, please visit the Library Enquiry Desk for further help, or ask your Academic Support Librarian.

Please note:  Due to the popularity of the PCs during peak times, it is advisable to kindly ask any person working on a PC with specialist software on if you can use it if you need it urgently, should other PCs be available to move to.

As noted above, students will be made aware of the PCs with specialist software on because they are clearly labelled.  Related to this, please do allow yourself plenty of time to access the software should you need to use it by a deadline.

Don’t forget that standard software is also available!

There is also a range of standard software available on all of The Library’s open access PCs across campus.  You can find out what software is available here.

To find out where open access PCs are located across campus, and how many are available in real time, take a look at the list here.

As a student you also have access to some software from off campus via the Student Software Portal.  To find out more and learn how to access it, take a look here.

Sage Research Methods Videos

9 May 2018

Looking to undertake some research this year? Need some expert help and guidance? SAGE Research Methods is the essential online resource for anyone doing research or learning how to do research. With more than 800 books, reference works, journal articles, and videos, it provides information on writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing a research method, collecting and analyzing data, and writing up the findings. SAGE Research Methods’ coverage spans the full range of research methods used in the social and behavioral sciences, plus a wide range of methods commonly used in science, technology, medicine, and the humanities.

You can

  • Embed videos onto your blackboard sites
  • Choose from different types of videos, from case studies, interviews and tutorials
  • Helps you to write up methodology for publication in the best research journals

Why not watch this short video for an overview of this great resource

https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/sage-research-methods

 

You can access this content from both on and off campus here.

Finding Patents

4 July 2017

Looking for patents? Anne shows you where you can find them.

Patents are useful as they can show the latest technological development in a particular field, and often describe significant developments long before they are revealed elsewhere. If you are working in a field of engineering, for example, and need to think of a design solution to a particular problem you might like to look at some patents for inspiration.

Scopus

You might be familiar with Scopus for finding journal articles, but did you know it provides access to over 28 million patents from five patent offices as well?

  • European Patent Office
  • Japan Patent Office
  • UK Intellectual Property Office
  • US Patent & Trademark Office
  • World Intellectual Property Organization

To access Scopus go to the Library’s Resources page, click the letter ‘‘, select ‘SCOPUS’, then click ‘Link to Database’.

Scopus search screen

re-order by relevance

Because the patents on Scopus are drawn from different offices, the pages you click through to will look different – but look for links called “Image” or “Original Document”, etc.

You might find some great designs:

USPTO 595629

And you will almost certainly find some strange ones:

JPS 6031276

I think this cat has every right to look alarmed, don’t you?

 

Do you know how to reference a patent?

A reference for a patent is in this format:

Inventor, A. B. (Year). Title of patent. Patent Office No. Patent number.

For example:

Ichihara, A., & Maruta, F. (1984). Cat Washing Bag. Japan Patent Office No. JPS59139052U

Now here’s the tricky part!

Your in-text citation uses the Patent Office number and year, but not the inventor.
So this one would be:
(Japan Patent No. JPS59139052U, 1984) or
Japan Patent No. JPS59139052U (1984).

If you wish though, you can include the inventors’ names in your text, for example:

Ichihara and Maruta’s innovative design (Japan Patent No. JPS59139052U, 1984) helped restrain cats for the purpose of washing …

Explore ESDU

15 June 2017

Need engineering design methods and data? Anne shows you where you can find these.

Do you need access to design methods and data for aeronautical, mechanical or structural engineering?

 

little logoESDU (Engineering Sciences Data Unit) provides data, software tools and design methods that have been monitored, guided and rigorously tested and validated by technical committees comprised of leading experts from industry, academia and government organisations from around the world.

In short, this is information you can trust.

 

What’s more, you won’t find this information on Google or Wikipedia – in in many cases the data and information is unpublished and only available through ESDU.

When you are designing or building something, you don’t want it to fall apart, do you?

 

Access ESDU through Library Search.

Go to sign in if you are working off-campus.
ESDU2

When ESDU opens read the Agreement and click the Yes, I accept… button.

Not sure where to start?

ESDU5

ESDU4

Once you are familiar with the types of information you can find on ESDU, try using the Search box to find the things you need.

Do you know how to eSubmit your work?

3 April 2017

Amy Pearson

Amy points out handy resources to help you with e-Submission

Turnitin is used for the e-submission of your assignments. It is an online tool that you use to upload your work so that it can be marked by your tutor. You access Turnitin from Blackboard.

Important things you need to know about submitting your work for marking

  • Use the correct naming convention for your files – your school may specify a particular format.
  • Submit your completed assignment to the correct, FINAL submissions folder when it is ready for marking. Work submitted mistakenly to the DRAFT folder at this stage will not be marked.
  • When you submit work for marking, you are accepting the submission declaration.
  • Check the file size. Files must be less than 40Mb. Contact your lecturer if your file is greater than 40Mb.
  • Use an accepted file type. File types accepted are: MS Word, WordPerfect, PostScript, PDF, HTML, RTF or plain text. You can ask at The Library for help if you are not sure about a file type. For non text-based assessments (e.g. audio/video, etc.) your tutor may use the Blackboard Assignment Tool.
  • read more

    Planning and writing your assignment – your 6 steps to essay success!

    20 March 2017

    Amy Pearson

    This time of year is all about assignments. Amy has shared the Skills for Learning 6 steps to essay success!

    It’s that time of year again when deadlines are looming so we thought we’d share with you our 6 steps to essay success.

    • Step 1: Analyse and Plan
    • Step 2: Search and Evaluate
    • Step 3: Read and Make Notes
    • Step 4: Write your Essay
    • Step 5: Review and Submit
    • Step 6: Reflect

    Read on to learn more about each step!

     

     

     

    Step 1: Analyse and PlanStep 1: Analyse and Plan

    When you are given a question or task to complete you need to make sure that you understand what you are being asked to do and then plan how you will approach it. If you don’t answer the question being set you are more likely to get a low mark. With this in mind, the first step to essay success is to ANALYSE and PLAN. This involves analysing your task, making a plan and identifying useful words that describe your topic. You need to make sure that you pay attention to the instructions you have been given, be clear about the topic you have been asked to explore and any restrictions to the scope of your answer. read more

    Find library resources more easily using ‘Locate’!

    30 January 2017
    Tracy Breheny

    Tracy shows you how to use ‘Locate’.

    Overwhelmed by the number of resources in the library?  Lost amongst the shelving with no idea which direction to go in?  Not sure where to find a book you need?  You can find out exactly where a book is located in the Library using our ‘Locate’ tab.

    The ‘Locate’ tab is available for all resources you find in Library Search, and it makes locating books you need much easier.

    To use the ‘Locate’ tab:

    1. First of all, look for the book you want in Library Search.

    2. When you find the book you want, you’ll see a blue ‘Locate’ button below the title.  Click this. read more

    Finding databases for Computing, Science and Engineering

    7 June 2016

    When you have an assignment or dissertation to write you will need to find information to support your argument. As well as books you will need to use journal articles, as they can provide highly-specialised, up-to-date, and properly researched and verified information.

    The Library subscribes to a wide range of databases which allow you to search across thousands of journals at once, to help you find exactly the information you need to help you write your assignment.

    To find the best databases for your subject area, start at Library Search.

    Library Search - databases and sign in link

    • Click the Databases link.
    • Scroll down the menu to find your subject area.

    database lists

    • When you have selected your subject click the Submit button.
    • You will see a list of results like this:

    database results

    There are lists for the following subject areas:

    • Acoustics
    • Aeronautical Engineering
    • Audio and Video Technology
    • Civil Engineering
    • Computer Science
    • Data Communications
    • Gas and Petroleum Engineering
    • Mathematics
    • Mechancial Engineering
    • Physics
    • Robotics and Automation

    As well as journal articles, our databases provide access to all sorts of other information: e-books, conference papers, standards, theses, broadcasts and more.

    Have a look and see what is available for you to use.

    Want a book, but it’s not at the University of Salford Library?

    11 November 2015

    You want it, we'll get it

    If you want a particular book, but we don’t have it in stock at all at any of the University’s libraries, it doesn’t have to be the end of the story. Try our You Want It, We’ll Get It service – fill in the short e-form at http://www.salford.ac.uk/library/use/you-want-it-well-get-it . In most cases we’ll buy the book for the Library, and you’ll be notified when the book is ready – no cost to you personally! You can also find the link on the Library webpage.