Posts tagged: advanced search

Peer Review. What’s it all about?

29 October 2014

You may see or have been told to look for journals and journal articles  which are ‘peer reviewed’. But what does that mean? Peer review, also known as refereeing, is a collaborative process that means articles submitted to a to a journal are evaluated and by independent experts within the same field of research- their ‘peers’.

They evaluate and assess articles and provide authors with feedback to improve their work and provides valuable information to the editor to assess the paper’s suitability for publication in the journal. read more

Getting the most out of Construction Information Service

8 July 2014

Construction Information Service (CIS) is a database which covers a large range of  information relevant to the construction industry in the UK.   CIS has full-text access to current regulations, standards and industry news for architects, designers, engineers, quantity surveyors and health and safety staff.  It includes resources such as legislative and compliance regulations, British Standards, JCT contracts and CIBSE documents.

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You can search a number of different ways:

  • Use the tabs across the top and search by subject, publisher or series
  • Do a basic search using the search box on the front screen
  • Do a more detailed search using Advanced search

You can also check out the New Legislation tab for any new or amended legislation.  The Sustainability tab is also useful for resources on green construction and sustainable development planning. read more

Linking Google Scholar to find full-text articles off-campus

24 June 2014

Google Scholar allows you to search across scholarly literature indexed by Google. Links to the Find It menu are available to help you access the resources in the Google Scholar results.
To access Google Scholar, go to http://scholar.google.co.uk/

Using Google Scholar off campus
If you are using Google Scholar off campus you will need to configure Google Scholar preferences to display the Find It @ Salford links.

To do this:
• Go to Google Scholar
• Click on the Settings link
• Click on Library Links
• Search for ‘Salford’
• Check the box next to ‘University of Salford – Find It @ Salford’
• Click on ‘Save’ read more

Finding information on clinical topics

23 June 2014

NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries
Are you looking for reliable, evidence-based information about medical conditions? NICE CKS service provides health care practitioners with a readily accessible summary of the current evidence base and practical guidance on best practice in respect of over 300 common and/or significant primary care presentations.
To use this service, go to http://cks.nice.org.uk/ and either browse the list of conditions or search for one you’re interested in.
The topics are broken down into areas such as diagnosis, management, evidence and also indicates how up-to-date the information is. It also provides links to systematic reviews and randomized control trials on the subject. read more

Using MeSH headings in health searches

19 June 2014

MeSH stands for Medical Subject Headings. These headings were developed by the National Library of Medicine and are a list of key terms and phrases known as a ‘controlled vocabulary’. Databases such as Medline and the Cochrane Library allow the use of MeSH as a search tool.

The basic principle behind MeSH is that it defines the key words / phrases within medicine in a structured way.

 

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These headings are organised into ‘trees’ – starting with big general terms, branching off into smaller more specific ones. read more

Google’s hidden depths: getting the most out of Google

21 May 2014

Did you know Google Advanced Search allows you to refine and narrow your search?

Here are a few quick tips to get the most out of Google.

To access the Advanced Search you can go to: http://www.google.com/advanced_search

You will be presented with this search screen:

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The “all of these words” box is the default searching option and is very similar to the normal Google search. Google will search for all of these words appearing anywhere in the document, not necessarily together. This search will often bring back a very large number of results. read more