‘I See the Difference’ campaign set to inspire a new generation of allied health professionals

By Nov.02, 2018

We are proud to welcome the launch of the aspirational ‘I See the Difference’ campaign, spearheaded by the Health Education of England and Office for Students.

This exciting initiative aims to raise awareness of allied health professions by promoting the inspiring careers within Podiatry, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Orthoptics and Therapeutic Radiography – all of which are areas in short supply.

The campaign is part of the Strategic Interventions in Health Education Disciplines (SIHED) programme, a £3 million, three-year plan to help build sustainability of the allied health professions. For more information on the ‘I See the Difference’ campaign, please visit: https://iseethedifference.co.uk/

Become an allied health professional with the University of Salford

Are you someone who cares and wants to help people relieve their pain or strain? Or maybe even help them live fuller lives?

You can become a Podiatrist or Prosthetist and Orthotist at the University of Salford with a three-year honours degree. Find out more about our degree programmes below:

 

 
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Be a Greater Manchester Nurse – start your journey here

By Aug.02, 2018

On 29th June, we helped launch the ‘Be a Greater Manchester Nurse’ campaign.

We are proud to be part of this initiative led by the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership. The campaign also includes Manchester Metropolitan University, the universities of Manchester and Bolton and Greater Manchester trusts and care providers.

We want to showcase the amazing opportunities available to study to become a nurse in Greater Manchester and celebrate the achievements of an incredible workforce.

Central to the overall campaign is the striking “Bee” logo and an inspiring video, “Unsung”. The script for the film comes solely from song lyrics by Manchester musical icons such as Oasis, The Stone Roses, New Order and Elbow. The lyrics are spoken by GM nurses, including our very own students, against a photographic backdrop of nurses doing their jobs.

You can watch “Unsung” here:

#GreaterManchesterNurses #beagreatermanchesternurse

www.greatermanchesternurses.co.uk

 
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Counselling and Psychotherapy Team CPD event

By Jul.25, 2018

The Counselling and Psychotherapy Team  held a CPD event for all our Industry Partners – comprising of our placement providers.

This has been running now for 5 years and is the creation of James Barrott and Dr. Mark Widdowson.  It is an opportunity for our placement providers to sample a taste of the contemporary teaching that is on offer from our fabulous and talented team, to network and get more information about our programmes.  It’s also an opportunity for us to be in tune that what we are teaching our students is what our industry partners require for their employees.

Idyllic Forest

Sample sessions included sessions from Peter Jenkins on the GDPR requirements.  Peter also signed copied of his new book: ‘Professional Practice is counselling and psychotherapy’.  Other sessions included Transactional Analysis for anxiety – Dr. Mark Widdowson, creative supervision – Maria Kefalogianni, group work with young people – Leigh Gardner, compassion focussed therapy for trauma – Dr. Elaine Beaumont, trauma sensitive mindfulness  – Tim Duercen and James Barrott gave participants an opportunity to experience ‘outdoor therapy’  near Peel campus – who knew there was an idyllic forest setting there.

Feedback from our industry partners was excellent and we were able to announce our Supervision course starting in September.

 

“Just to say a very big thank you to you all for such an interesting and creative day on Tuesday. The organising was super and things ran so smoothly. It is lovely that you are able to reward placement providers in such a way and we are both grateful to have been included”

For more info please contact: VEE HOWARD-JONES, Head of Counselling and Psychotherapy, Email: V.S.Howard-Jones@salford.ac.uk

 
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60 Sec with Dr Salma Patel, Research Fellow

By Jul.09, 2018

1.What is your position within the School?

I’m a (postdoctoral) research fellow in Midwifery.

2.How long have you worked in the School of Health & Society

Since Dec 2017.

3.Which building are you based in?

I’m in the Allerton Building, Room L530.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

The project that I am working on BaSICS (Baby Skin Integrity Comparison Survey) initially attracted me to the school. It also fits with my research interests, which include public health, maternal health and digital health.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

When I received the email in my inbox that our ethics application to REC had been approved without amendments – the crazy hours working on the ethics application for our research project had finally paid off.

6.What is your biggest dream?

To develop multiple charitable projects internationally that aim to help those being abused.

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

Spend time with my family, read, attend fitness classes, and go for a walk around a lake.

8.What was your first job?

Teaching assistant.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

My daughter.

10.What would make your job easier?

Less bureaucracy and a warm, healthy and delicious lunch that was freshly made and subsidised/affordable. If there was such a thing as 100% healthy chocolate and cake – that would of course be a huge help!

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Work hard, aim high, and give everything you do, your very best!

 
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My experience at Salford

By May.08, 2018

Andreea Pausan

Andreea Pausan, ERASMUS +

Being in the right place at the right time sets the tone of the rest of the journey and for me, this happened at Salford.

My Phd journey started in October 2017, at the National School of Political and Administrative studies in Bucharest, Romania. Although post-graduate studies were not in plan, I have embraced the opportunity to learn how to do research and to bring my contribution to the betterment of higher education.  As trainer in a software company and part-time professor, my interests were life-long learning and in-service training for adults, as well as interactive and participative methods of teaching. Consequently, the focus pointed towards the way in which higher education should change in order to better respond to the participants’ needs and demands in the current connected information technology era.

I have arrived in Salford as an international exchange Erasmus student on a cold, rainy day at the end of January 2018.  Despite having some accumulated life, travel, and work experience, it is hard to put into words the feeling of going back to the university in a new city and in a different country.

I had been in Manchester some years back to enjoy a Cirque du Soleil performance. I remember having being riveted, among many other things, by the colours and magic of the show, by the great shopping at Trafford centre, and by the people queuing to get taxis in the mall parking lot. I did not expect to return on an extended stay near Manchester, as a guest at the University of Salford (UoS).

My first contact with the UoS was on email, and the Erasmus exchange staff sent me very useful and timely information: registration site, campus map, student askus link. After arriving to Salford, I was first impressed by the size of the campus and by how relaxed all the students seem to be. I had a student card ready, and received a user name and password for the system. I was pleased by the cleanliness of the place, by how organized everything was.

The library system was a shock: it was so easy (read user friendly) to take books out and return them by scanning them on a machine. The second shock was the language: everybody sounded competent, yet sympathetic, helpful, yet alien. I am not talking about being able to speak English, but about being able to talk research language, which is a completely different thing. On top of that, when living in a foreign country, the feeling is that of isolation and mystery, similar to being a passive participant in a film whose intrigue escapes immediate understanding. There is meaning, there is action, however there is also an empty space between the rest of participants and your grasp on reality. The community changes, taking away the familiar and bringing the unfamiliar, the insecure, the internal struggle.

It is interesting to live the very concepts you are studying: communities of practice (CoP).   At a certain point, I have realized that I can apply to living and learning in a different community terms like peripheral participation, boundary negotiation, nexus of multimembership, identity realignment: all part of the CoP framework.

I will use this terminology to describe the three months of my stay at Salford so far.

Although this is the first Erasmus exchange of this kind, I felt welcome and helped to integrate in the large student community, thus becoming a legitimate peripheral participant in both the Salford student community and the Phd community. My supervisor and the rest of the teachers I have met so far are passionate about students and learning, and provided helpful advice and access to make my stay both comfortable and productive.

Participation in different courses has given me the opportunity to meet and interact with other Phd students, as well as to learn about research methodology, theories and protocols, philosophical stances, different software and databases to help with research. Subsequently, I have developed my skills as a researcher and gained more confidence from the experiences shared with and by my fellow Phd students.

Furthermore, I have learned about means of transportation, places to eat, places to buy groceries from, all which are part of my new identity as a United Kingdom resident.  I am renegotiating my identity at the boundaries of several communities: student, researcher, citizen, worker, and so far it has been a satisfying experience.

It is exciting to know I can talk about my experience using social theory language. In layman terms, I love being here, I believe I am in the right place at the right time, and I would recommend this experience to other students. The environment at Salford is alive, filled with potential, with great support from the staff. Everything is available online and the classes are designed with a practical outcome in mind: they set the framework and create the conditions so students can write their thesis. The best part of this experience is meeting other students and learning about their cultures, their lives, their studies.

Andreea Pausan

National School of Political and Administrative studies in Bucharest 

Erasmus student @ School of Health & Society

 
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60 Sec with Rebecca Rylance, Assistant Director School of Health and Society 

By Mar.14, 2018

1.What is your position within the School?

Assistant Director School of Health and Society  – Health Directorate.

2.How long have you worked in the School of Health and Society, University of Salford?

17 months.

3.Which building are you based in?

Mary Seacole.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

The reputation Salford has for leading innovations in nursing both in teaching and learning and in research.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

My first day, feeling optimistic and hopeful that anything is possible.

6.What is your biggest dream?

To complete my PhD.

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

Spend time with my lovely partner and my three fantastic children.

8.What was your first job?

Saturday girl at the local paper shop (News agents).

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

Worked with people with dementia as a researcher and helped to co-create apps which have the potential to keep people with dementia live well for longer.

10.What would make your job easier?

Less emails!

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

If it’s not hard it’s not worth doing it.

 

 
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We welcome #hellomynameis campaign on campus

By Jan.17, 2018

The USSU Nursing Society are welcome Chris Pointon from the #hellomynameis campaign to campus on Wednesday 24th January 2018 from 1.30pm in MS g21.

The event is being hosted by the School of Health and Society and the Nursing Society. This campaign grown considerably over the years and has great relevance to all allied health professionals.

This event will be promoted on Twitter via the hashtags #ournameisSUNS and #hellomynameis.

Chris Pointon described the event for us:

This is a very personal, inspiring and heart-warming session that will leave you inspired, reflective and overall in awe of such an amazing individual that we were blessed to have as part of healthcare across the world.

My inspiring wife Dr Kate Granger MBE along with myself came up with a global campaign that was to revolutionise patient care across both the UK NHS and global healthcare. This session will take you on a journey from the conception of #hellomynameis which was born out of a bad patient experience (which I will talk all about) to how it now fits within global healthcare and how Kate’s legacy continues through the work I do and the numerous accolades named after her. I will talk about the background to my inspiring wife and her illness prior to #hellomynameis and what the ongoing support will mean to staff and patients alike in all healthcare settings.

Throughout the evolution of #hellomynameis we focus on patient care being at the forefront of what we do along with making interactions on any level and in any setting more of a human connection as this is the first rung on the ladder of communication. The practicalities of what this involves are fairly straight forward however it can lead to a much more therapeutic relationship.

A very inspiring journey proving that through adversity you can create a legacy. (Chris Pointon, 2017)”

 
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60 sec with Tracey Williamson, Reader (Public Involvement, Engagement & Experience)

By Dec.10, 2017

1.What is your position within the School?

Reader in Public Involvement, Engagement & Experience. This means a full time researcher in involving the public in research around dementia, enabling technology, improving services and patient experience using mostly participatory approaches. I also Lead on research impact for the school.

2.How long have you worked in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford? 

March 2005.

3.Which building are you based in?

Mary Seacole Room 143.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

I previously had a senior role in the NHS (Nurse Consultant Older People) and had gained a PhD in health services research through a Department of Health fellowship. My NHS Trust employer as less concerned with research than me so I decided to work in a university. I was born in Salford and wanted to give something back locally so Salford was first choice. I also knew some colleagues here already who I admired from working alongside them with the RCN Research Society.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

Being there on day one with the teams whose initial scoping workshop then led to the Institute for Dementia we have today and School User Carer group. It is great to see good ideas and teamwork succeed.

6.What is your biggest dream?

To get a better work life balance as my partner has days off in the week and I work flexibly around the kids.

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

With an 8 year old and a 10 year old I don’t relax much but have lots of fun! My favourite chill out place is any mountain or fell.

8.What was your first job?

I started out as a general medical ward senior staff nurse on permanent nights at North Manchester General.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

Being a single parent and holding down a challenging job well. When I look at my kids, I know I’ve done good. Influencing the public involvement field is my main achievement.

10.What would make your job easier?

To be surrounded by people with a can do attitude who value what I do and trust me to know what I am doing. Slicker, more agile systems.

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Be driven by your values, work with nice people and remember relationships are with people not organisations. Your best is good enough.

 
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60 sec with Ben Light, Professor of Digital Society

By Sep.08, 2017

Prof Ben Light

Prof Ben Light

1.What is your position within the School?

Professor of Digital Society

2.How long have you worked in the School of Health & Society? 

Just over a year, but I also worked at Salford from 1999-2014

3.Which building are you based in?

Mary Seacole

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

Read more…..

 
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School wins eight ESRC Social Science Festival funding awards

By Jul.21, 2017

Following a recent round of ESRC Social Science Festival funding, we are delighted to announce 8 of the 11 funding awards granted by the University have been made to our School. You will see there is a fabulous range of initiatives. There will be a showcase event in October that will illustrate approaches to impact taken by these and past award holders of HEIF and impact funding. The aim is to share ideas and tools for impact, learn from other schools as well as each other, and to explore innovative means of maximising impact.

Congratulations to all of the initiatives below!

Read more…..

 
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