Christmas in Latvia

By Dec.22, 2016

latviaDid you know that Latvia is the birthplace of the decorated Christmas tree? Apparently old records show that it was in Old Town in Riga, the capital of Latvia, where the first Christmas tree was decorated in the 16th century. Today Latvians still decorate real fir trees with real candles and ornaments, often made from straw and other natural materials.

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Christmas in Macedonia

By Dec.21, 2016

flagChristmas in Macedonia is celebrated very differently to the UK. For starters, in Macedonia, Christmas is on January the 7th. Secondly, Macedonians don’t exchange presents at Christmas, but at New Year and lastly, Christmas dinner is traditionally totally vegan. Yes, no turkeys involved, and they live to see another Christmas in Macedonia 🙂

You might be thinking why so different? Well, the Macedonian Orthodox Church uses the Julian calendar for the religious festivals unlike the Gregorian calendar used for all secular activities. And although the main Christmas day is on the 7th, the celebrations start on the 5th January on a day called ‘Kolede’. This is the day when early in the morning children go door to door, singing Christmas carols and get cookies, fruit, nuts and coins from the hosts. Later in the day, the elderly gather around a bonfire (every neighbourhood lights up one) while drinking warmed up spirits ‘rakija’ and wine and reminiscing about the year passed and the year to come.

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Christmas in the United Kingdom…

By Dec.20, 2016

christmas1For me, Christmas celebrations generally get started in early December. In the first week or so I find that if the excitement of eating my advent calendar chocolates hasn’t triggered those festive feelings, then going along to a local Christmas event is sure to do the trick! As a child, these early December outings were all about queuing up to meet Father Christmas and pestering your parents for sweet treats, like hot chocolate topped with a mountain of whipped cream and marshmallows. As an adult, it’s now much more about sharing a spiced cider or mulled wine with friends at the Christmas markets. Regardless of which drink is in hand, this is typically when my favourite festive moment happens: the countdown to the Christmas lights switch on. A close second favourite has to be decorating the Christmas tree, which usually happens around the same time.

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Season’s Greetings from our Dean, Margaret Rowe

By Dec.18, 2016

Season’s greetings to our students, staff, alumni & friends around the world! I am looking forward to working closely with you to make exciting and new memories and achievements.

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Margaret Rowe,

Dean of School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences

University of Salford

 
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Sabah’ experience of PhD at the University of Salford, Manchester, UK

By Nov.13, 2016

PhD experience

Sabah Ismile Alsomali PhD experience

I am Sabah Ismile Alsomali, PhD third year student at the University of Salford, School: Nursing, Midwifery, and Social Work and Social Sciences.

My PhD First Year Experiences

I arrived in Manchester in September 2014, eager to begin my doctoral studies in a new country, as an international student from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. I chose to travel to the UK for my degree to broaden my academic and personal horizons.

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60 sec with Julie Lawrence, Lecturer in Social Work

By Oct.31, 2016

pic0061.What is your position within the School?

I am a lecturer in social work and the programme leader for the post graduate Continuous Professional Development  (CPD) Social Work Programme.

2.How long have you worked in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford? 

I joined the school in November 2000, as a part-time tutor. I became a lecturer in social work in April 2010.

3.Which building are you based in?

The Allerton Building.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

I chose to work within the school because it has a modern, lively atmosphere and there are opportunities to undertake research projects which I can share with students.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

When my tutee presented the outcomes from her research in 2015 at an international conference. I was there to saviour the moment s of her success.

6.What is your biggest dream?

That everyone has a guiding voice to support opportunities to fulfil  potential   .

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

I visit beautiful gardens and admire the vistas.

8.What was your first job?

My first job was based within the Magistrate’s Court in Chester, I worked as a Probation Assistant to the Court.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

Undertaking my PhD and meeting a Social Learning Theorist: Professor Etienne Wenger-Trayner in 2014.

10.What would make your job easier?

Although important, less administration.

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Have the courage to take a risk and believe in yourself to succeed: ‘no matter what’.

 
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Nowhere safe to stay: the dangers of sleeping rough

By Oct.21, 2016

This report from St Mungo’s, presents new evidence on the dangers of rough sleeping and the poor service people often receive from council housing options teams. It is based on 40 interviews with St Mungo’s clients and highlights how some asked for help but were turned away or even instructed to sleep rough in order to access services. It makes a number of recommendations – including for MPs and government to support the Homelessness Reduction Bill. It is a policy report containing original research that may be of interest to campaigners, policy professionals and the press. Katy Jones, Research Fellow from the Sustainable Housing & Urban Studies Unit (SHUSU) at the University of Salford was involved in the data collection phase of this study.

To download a copy of the report please visit St Mungo’s website

 
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Salford student makes a difference

By Oct.05, 2016

euphrasia

Euphrasia

This week three Ugandan healthcare professionals are arriving at the University of Salford on the Commonwealth Professional Fellowship programme. This is Euphrasia, our previous colleague, who has returned and made a profound impact. The health centre she works in (Kagote) had not delivered a baby for 16 years and it is now the best performing health centre in the District with deliveries increasing all the time.

Euphrasia is now able to contribute to teaching on their new midwifery degree supported by our charity and Salford staff. And now we are embarking on supporting another failing health centre. Kagote is the facility we choose to place Salford midwifery students in on placement so they get great support. If you are going over there look out for her smiling face!

Find out more about Knowledge4Change & University of Salford Knowledge and Place projects.

 

 
 
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60 sec with Dr Anthony Ellis, Lecturer in Criminology and Sociology

By Oct.03, 2016

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Dr Anthony Ellis

1.What is your position within the School?

Lecturer in Criminology and Sociology.

2.How long have you worked in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford? 

I joined the School in August 2014.

3.Which building are you based in?

Allerton.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

Salford has a long and rich history of teaching and research in the fields of sociology and criminology, which is important for me.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

Finding out I had been nominated for a teaching award.

6.What is your biggest dream?

Rotherham United FC to lift the FA Cup at Wembley.

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

Read, watch films, gym, watch football, spend time with family.

8.What was your first job?

Waiter and porter in a hotel.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

Winning the British Society of Criminology Critical Criminology Network Prize for my book Men, Masculinities and Violence: An Ethnographic Study.

10.What would make your job easier?

A cure for writer’s block.

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Be open to new ideas.

 
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60 seconds with Sarah Riding, Lecturer in Social Work

By Sep.21, 2016

1.What is your position within the School?

I’m a Lecturer in Social Work. I’m also the Programme Leader for the undergraduate degree programmes in Social Work.

2.How long have you worked in the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, University of Salford? 

I joined the University of Salford in September 2013 as a Lecturer in Social Work within the School.

3.Which building are you based in?

I am based in Allerton Building on the sixth floor in Room C605.

4.Why did you choose to work within the School?

I had previously been teaching on Health and Social Care, Primary Teaching and Early Years Degrees in Blackpool, however as a Social Worker I was keen to teach my speciality and was impressed with what the University offered both staff and students.

5.What is your most memorable moment of being in the School?

There are many memorable moments, however I particularly enjoy meeting each new group of social work students during induction, I love the enthusiasm and great potential I can see and watching them develop and finally graduate is the icing on the cake.

6.What is your biggest dream?

To see any form of injustice and hatred towards others banished from society, I want our children to believe they have a future where they believe they can achieve anything they want and are given the means to do so.

To be there when Manchester City win the Champions league.

7.When you are not at work what do you do to relax?

I love to watch movies but my great passion is sport, I have a season ticket for Manchester City FC and watch them home and away, I have learned to live with the highs and a lot of lows over the years but love being in the crowd and meeting so many different people.

8.What was your first job?

My first job was working as a Health Care assistant at Blackpool Victoria Hospital on outpatients and on older people’s rehabilitation wards.

9. What has been your greatest achievement?

On a personal level working in Mother Teresa’s home for the dying in Kokata and having the privilege of meeting her, definitely the most moving moment.

Professionally it is simply the success of my students, makes everything worthwhile.

10.What would make your job easier?

Definitely more time, rather than making the job easier, for me  it’s about making it more effective, I would love to have more time to spend face to face with students.

11.Finally, what one piece of advice would you give to students/colleagues?

Always aim high!

“If you judge people, you have no time to love them.” ― Mother Teresa

 
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