Archive for August 31, 2018

Poverty’s impact on Wellbeing – 6th August 2018

Poverty’s impact on Wellbeing – 6th August 2018

 

The work of SHUSU’s Dr Lisa Scullion and Dr Graeme Sherriff has featured on The Conversation in their article ‘Poverty’s Impact on Wellbeing is Hard to Ignore’ (http://theconversation.com/povertys-impact-on-well-being-is-hard-to-ignore-51378).

In it they discuss the wide-ranging ways in which poverty can impact upon wellbeing, including through the cold homes, housing insecurity, unhealthy air, poor food access, and work and welfare insecurity.

Their article was syndicated by Yahoo News (https://uk.news.yahoo.com/poverty-apos-impact-well-being-082046094.html?guccounter=1 ) and the World Economic Forum, (https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/08/reasons-why-poverty-and-lower-life-expectancy-go-hand-in-hand/).

 

SHUSU Logo


PhD student presents films at leading media arts centre

Pavel Prokopic, a filmmaker and Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) North West Consortium funded PhD candidate in the School of Arts and Media, is presenting his films at leading media arts centre, FACT, in Liverpool, from 21 to 23 August.

Pavel has been on placement at FACT for the past six months, where he has been developing his practice-based research in ‘affective cinema’.

Rather than focusing on story and character development as many films do, affective cinema instead aims to create moments of strong feeling, through alternative approaches to cinematography and the directing of performers. As Pavel says, affective cinema ‘does not aim to tell a story’, rather it explores ‘the beauty of images and unpredictability of reality’, through ‘the infinite palette of cinema’.

Pavel’s supervisor and co-director of postgraduate research in the School of Arts and Media, Dr Joanne Scott, commented: “It’s great that Pavel has taken full advantage of the opportunities for placement offered by the North West Consortium, through forging this link with FACT. It also demonstrates that the innovative, creative research that he and other postgraduate researchers are doing in the school is of interest to our leading cultural venues.”

Ten of Pavel’s short films will be presented at the venue, as part of an experimental video installation:

For more info click here

Still from one of Pavel’s films


Salford to benefit from funding to train new researchers

THE UNIVERSITY of Salford is one of seven North West institutions set to benefit from funding to train new researchers.

 

The North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NWCDTP), led by The University of Manchester, is one of 10 consortia who will share more than £170 million in funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) over eight years.

This equates to funding and training for at least 225 new researchers in the arts and humanities through the NWCDTP.

DTPs provide innovative training environments for doctoral researchers. They include opportunities for PhD students to undertake broader training or development, such as language learning, overseas research visits, or placements with non-academic partners.

The consortium includes a wide variety of bodies beyond the university sector that students can engage with to further their experience, from multinational organisations to local museums and galleries.

 

 

Professor Seamus Simpson, Consortium Institutional Lead at the University of Salford, said: “I am delighted that the North West Consortium has been awarded this substantial funding to allow it to build on the achievements of the first phase of our Doctoral Training Partnership.

“We at Salford are proud members of the consortium and recognise the contribution AHRC funded students make to our postgraduate research community. We look forward with particular pleasure to hosting the annual consortium student research conference this October at our MediacityUK campus.”

Dr Erica Baffelli, NWCDTP Director, said: “On behalf of the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership I am delighted by this new award from the AHRC, which will allow us to fund and train at least 225 new researchers in the arts and humanities. Since its formation in 2014, the NWCDTP has established a successful partnership that provides high-quality doctoral training across the whole range of the arts and humanities. In the new phase of the DTP we will build on our effective partnership to continue to innovate to produce impactful research.

“One-fifth of our studentships will be for collaborative PhDs, where projects are designed by the student and academic supervisor in collaboration with organisations from business, the public sector or the third sector. Our Early Career Strategy will support early career researchers by offering post-submission impact fellowships with non-HEI partners and therefore addressing the crucial challenge of transition to employment.

“We will also develop our collaboration with the ESRC NWSSDTP and with other DTPs based in the north of England. By providing high-quality and innovative research training, and promoting knowledge exchange with non-HEI organizations we aim at enabling doctoral students to develop into highly skilled leaders within and beyond the academy.”

Professor Edward Harcourt, the AHRC’s Director of Research, Strategy and Innovation, said: “The AHRC is delighted to announce its renewed commitment to the Doctoral Training Partnerships model. Our support for the next generation of arts and humanities researchers is critical to securing the future of the UK arts and humanities sector, which accounts for nearly a third of all UK academic staff, is renowned the world over for its outstanding quality, and which plays a vital part in our higher education ecosystem as a whole.

“We were extremely pleased with the response to our call, which saw high-quality applications from across the UK from a variety of diverse and innovative consortia, each with a clear strategy and vision for the future support of their doctoral students.”

The DTPs will start recruiting the first cohort of students imminently ahead of starting their studies in October 2019.

The NWCDTP is a Consortium of seven Research Organisations led by The University of Manchester and comprising:

  •  Keele University

  •  Lancaster University

  •  Manchester Metropolitan University

  •  Royal Northern College of Music

  •  University of Liverpool

  •  University of Salford

in partnership with:

  •  BBC

  •  FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology)

  •  FutureEverything

  •  HOME

  •  Manchester City Council

  •  Museum of Science and Industry

  •  National Trust

  •  Opera North

  •  Staffordshire Archives

  •  Tate Liverpool

  •  The British Library

  •  The National Football Museum


Impact Case Study Examples

The University of Salford’s REF intranet site (www.salford.ac.uk/ref) has recently been updated to include some of the annotated case study drafts from the recent external peer review exercise.

The insightful comments from the peer reviewers will be used to help shape further case study drafts and also to help inform the forthcoming internal peer review process.

Examples can be found under the Impact section: External Peer Review

 

Some general points noted by the external peer reviewers include:

  • A number of case studies don’t distinguish between research and resulting impact, instead flagging impacts that appear to be benefits to the academy rather than societal impacts, so some further advice on that distinction might be useful
  • Some cases focus on dissemination at the expense of resulting impacts, again further advice and clarification might help
  • Some do not convincingly demonstrate robustness of underpinning research or links between the research and claimed impacts, some of this may be limitations in the research, some could be developed further
  • Most could improve the clarity with which impacts are articulated, and their apparent significance and reach (true of most cases, from a variety of institutions, at this stage)
  • Most need to supplement the current corroboration with more in depth, specific or appropriate evidence
  • It is very likely that submission of names and positions of staff, and dates of employment at the institution will be mandatory, so do that now, especially to show clarity around eligibility
  • All evidence will need to be submitted with the case studies so ensure it is in an accessible and appropriate format.  Where web pages are used, ensure you have preserved them and don’t just use standard links.

 

Further information on what makes a top impact case study can be found at the following external site, for example:

What makes a 4* Impact Case Study:

Fast Track Impact What Makes a 4 Star Impact Case Study.pdf

What made a 4* Impact Case Study in REF2014:

https://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2018/06/04/What-made-a-4-impact-case-study-in-REF2014

 

A section on how to identify 4* impact case studies on the REF2014 website and to look at lessons learned from REF2014 can also be found at:

https://teamsite.salford.ac.uk/sites/sc02/REF2021/SitePages/REF2014%20and%20Impact.aspx

 

Why not take this opportunity to check out this and other impact resources available on the REF staff intranet: https://www.salford.ac.uk/ref