Posts in Educational Research and Scholarship Category

Becoming a Higher Education Academy National Teaching Fellow

Photo - Dr Jacqueline Leigh

 

Dr Jacqueline Leigh moved into academia from being a Senior Nurse Manager in the NHS. Since qualifying as a registered nurse in 1986 Jacqueline has maintained her professional registration and gained a BSc (Hons) in Nursing and Masters in Health Professional Education. She also completed her PhD in 2012 and in 2017 was awarded Principal Fellow Higher Education Academy.

Her continual professional development has resulted in changes that have been made within the areas of healthcare leadership and management, pedagogical research and health professional practice. This has culminated into being appointed the first Reader Teaching and Learning, Health Professional Education at the University of Salford.

 

Impact of work

Over the years she has developed strong strategic partnerships that inspire a commitment to learning by both academics and students within the field of health professional education. Impact is the bringing together of the right stakeholders from NHS and private, voluntary and independent health and social care organisations across Greater Manchester to develop and implement strategies to address quality assurance in relation to: the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) professional requirements for undergraduate pre-registration nursing practice placements; and Health Education England North West and Department of Health directives.

An advocate for evidence based education, teaching and assessment Jacqueline innovates curriculum and assessment and supports workforce development through teaching and learning excellence. She is committed to supporting others in engaging in academic scholarship and professional development through which she is able to ensure that every academic has the potential to disseminate good practice.

 

Plans for the future

Jacqueline is a strategic champion at the University of Salford and Non-Executive Director at Healthwatch Salford which enables her to influence the healthcare services being developed to improve patient experience in Salford.

In the future she will continue to work with others to help them face the challenges of an evolving higher education system and the changes which are taking place within the field of health professional education.

 

What it Means to be a National Teaching Fellow


Talking Teaching: Why I became a Principal Fellow – A blog post by Dr Jackie Leigh @JackieALeigh

Dr Jackie Leigh, Reader Teaching and Learning at the University of Salford, moved into academia from being a Senior Nurse Manager in the NHS. After qualifying as a registered nurse Jackie has since gained a BSc (Hons) in Nursing, MSc in Health Professional Education and completed her PhD in 2012.  In February 2017 she became a Principal Fellow of the HEA, as well as recently being awarded a prestigious HEA National Teaching Fellowship (NTF) in September. The NTF award recognises, rewards and celebrates individuals who have made an outstanding impact on student learning and the teaching profession.

I became an HEA Fellow in 1999, then a Senior Fellow in 2015. I thought I’d been in education a long time and that I met the criteria for Principal Fellow so decided to apply. It was a good time to start the process as it’s similar to the route of becoming a future professor in teaching and learning.

I’m the first Reader in Teaching and Learning, Nursing and Health Professional Education here at Salford and I’m a strong advocate for supporting healthcare workforce development through teaching and learning excellence. As a strategic champion here at the University and Non-Executive Director at Healthwatch Salford, I’m able to influence the healthcare services being developed to improve patient experience in Salford.

The process of applying for Principal Fellow was a very useful reflective practice for me, especially considering the impact of my teaching on the student experience and consequently on patients. Ultimately what we do at university level has to be about the needs of the patients.

The timing has been great due to the incredible synergy between becoming an NTF, Principal Fellow and receiving a University of Salford Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award. I feel I can now truly demonstrate the impact I’ve had at institutional and national level. It’s a win, win on both a personal and institutional level. For anyone seeking a chair in teaching and learning, I’d say becoming a Principal Fellow is a must; it gives you the evidence you need and is a great way of demonstrating national presence.

Since becoming National Teaching Fellow I’ve been working with the quality and enhancement team on academic leadership across the university which has been fantastic.

Becoming recognised through the Principal Fellowship definitely helps to open up a whole range of new opportunities. It’s really amazing what’s happened so far, and my recent award of a National Teaching Fellowship has also been fantastic.

I applied for National Teaching Fellow recognition so that I could showcase my achievements in teaching and learning, as well as emphasising my ability to enhance the student experience. I was also keen to highlight the quality of teaching at Salford and instil pride in both the nursing profession and student learning.

In the future I will continue to work with others to help them face the challenges of an evolving higher education system and the changes which are taking place within the field of nursing and health professional education.


Unclear education roles to support practice learning – A blog post by Dr Jackie Leigh @JackieALeigh

HEIs are responding to the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) Consultation on Standards of Proficiency for Registered nurses. Also required is for HEIs to tell the NMC their views on the Education Framework: Standards for Education and Training.

The NMC refer to their standards as being ambitious, setting out the enhanced knowledge and skills that people can expect from nurses in the future. It will be interesting to see if this view is reflected in the results of the consultation.

It is interesting to look at the two documents in terms of practice learning, particularly in relation to by whom and how nurses will be supervised and assessed in clinical practice and what should be the educational requirement.

A key message and what will not change from the current pre-registration standards is the fundamental requirement for partnerships between HEIs and healthcare organizations to provide the practice based learning for the student nurse.

What is new is the introduction of the Five Pillars for education and training:

  1. Learning culture
  2. Educational governance and quality
  3. Student learning and empowerment
  4. Educators and assessors
  5. Curricula and assessment

What seems to be absent from this new consultation and draft document are the prescriptive elements for the education and on-going continuing professional development needs of educators and assessors of student nurse in practice. The current requirements for mentorship are set out in the 2008 NMC Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice: Preparation for Mentors, Practice Teachers and Teachers, and have led to the proliferation of credit and non- credit bearing programmes that prepare the qualified nurse for the role of mentor. Prescriptive annual updates are also required in order to comply with maintaining ‘live’ mentorship recognition.

In the current NMC education framework consultation document, new roles are introduced such as practice supervisor (Pillar 3), educator and assessor (Pillar 4). When reading this document is it clear the difference in roles and preparation for the role?

Education Framework

The NMC state:

“Our education framework and the new requirements for learning and assessment provide flexibility for approved education institutions, practice placement and work placed learning providers in developing innovative approaches to education for nurses and midwives while being accountable for the local delivery and management of NMC approved programmes in line with our standards” (NMC 2017:5).  Is this statement permission by the NMC for entrepreneurialism or are they being vague with no real ideas of their own?

Taking a position that the NMC are offering some flexibility regarding practice based learning, timely is the need for HEIs and healthcare organizations to work collaboratively and to set their benchmark for quality teaching and learning. Reconsidering models of student support is imperative. This includes the use of coaching as opposed to mentoring and to redefine the practice roles required. Be creative and entrepreneurial adopting service improvement and transformation tools and techniques.

Flexible should not mean reduced quality. Indeed, Health Education England whose wider remit for ensuring that there are high quality learning environments for all healthcare learners in England makes clear their expectations of what constitutes a quality clinical learning environment.

Within the Greater Manchester we are in a strong position, already adopting coaching approaches to supporting student clinical leadership development. The Greater Manchester Practice Education Group that is attended by all 4 HEIs and healthcare practice organisations provides the platform for leading innovations in healthcare delivery models. Clear is the need for academic leadership to deliver on any new models of education and to create the culture shift required.

What do you feel are the top 3 leadership behaviours required to affect change and to change cultures for practice learning?

Find out more: