Posts in NMSWSS Category

Unclear education roles to support practice learning – A blog post by Dr Jackie Leigh @JackieALeigh

HEIs are responding to the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) Consultation on Standards of Proficiency for Registered nurses. Also required is for HEIs to tell the NMC their views on the Education Framework: Standards for Education and Training.

The NMC refer to their standards as being ambitious, setting out the enhanced knowledge and skills that people can expect from nurses in the future. It will be interesting to see if this view is reflected in the results of the consultation.

It is interesting to look at the two documents in terms of practice learning, particularly in relation to by whom and how nurses will be supervised and assessed in clinical practice and what should be the educational requirement.

A key message and what will not change from the current pre-registration standards is the fundamental requirement for partnerships between HEIs and healthcare organizations to provide the practice based learning for the student nurse.

What is new is the introduction of the Five Pillars for education and training:

  1. Learning culture
  2. Educational governance and quality
  3. Student learning and empowerment
  4. Educators and assessors
  5. Curricula and assessment

What seems to be absent from this new consultation and draft document are the prescriptive elements for the education and on-going continuing professional development needs of educators and assessors of student nurse in practice. The current requirements for mentorship are set out in the 2008 NMC Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice: Preparation for Mentors, Practice Teachers and Teachers, and have led to the proliferation of credit and non- credit bearing programmes that prepare the qualified nurse for the role of mentor. Prescriptive annual updates are also required in order to comply with maintaining ‘live’ mentorship recognition.

In the current NMC education framework consultation document, new roles are introduced such as practice supervisor (Pillar 3), educator and assessor (Pillar 4). When reading this document is it clear the difference in roles and preparation for the role?

Education Framework

The NMC state:

“Our education framework and the new requirements for learning and assessment provide flexibility for approved education institutions, practice placement and work placed learning providers in developing innovative approaches to education for nurses and midwives while being accountable for the local delivery and management of NMC approved programmes in line with our standards” (NMC 2017:5).  Is this statement permission by the NMC for entrepreneurialism or are they being vague with no real ideas of their own?

Taking a position that the NMC are offering some flexibility regarding practice based learning, timely is the need for HEIs and healthcare organizations to work collaboratively and to set their benchmark for quality teaching and learning. Reconsidering models of student support is imperative. This includes the use of coaching as opposed to mentoring and to redefine the practice roles required. Be creative and entrepreneurial adopting service improvement and transformation tools and techniques.

Flexible should not mean reduced quality. Indeed, Health Education England whose wider remit for ensuring that there are high quality learning environments for all healthcare learners in England makes clear their expectations of what constitutes a quality clinical learning environment.

Within the Greater Manchester we are in a strong position, already adopting coaching approaches to supporting student clinical leadership development. The Greater Manchester Practice Education Group that is attended by all 4 HEIs and healthcare practice organisations provides the platform for leading innovations in healthcare delivery models. Clear is the need for academic leadership to deliver on any new models of education and to create the culture shift required.

What do you feel are the top 3 leadership behaviours required to affect change and to change cultures for practice learning?

Find out more:

 


How to Write a 4* Journal Article

Professor Mark Reed, Professor of Socio-Technical Innovation at Newcastle University

In December, Prof Mark Reed, Professor of Socio-Technical Innovation at Newcastle University and the man behind Fast Track Impact, tweeted some thoughts on how to write a 4* paper for the REF and wrote a blog about it. This post is published here with the author’s permission.

How do you write a 4* paper for the Research Excellence Framework (REF)? It is a question I’ve asked myself with some urgency since the Stern Review shredded my REF submission by not allowing me to bring my papers with me this year to my new position at Newcastle University.

Obviously the answer is going to differ depending on your discipline, but I think there are a few simple things that everyone can do to maximize their chances of getting a top graded research output.

I’m going to start with the assumption that you’ve actually done original, significant and rigorous work – if you haven’t then there is no point in reading any further. However, as I am increasingly asked to pre-review papers for colleagues across a range of disciplines, I am seeing examples of people who write up work as a 2* or 3* paper that has the potential to get a better score. I should point out that I believe that there is an important role for 1* and 2* papers, and that I regularly write these on purpose to address a problem of national significance and frame it for the specific, narrow audience that is likely to be able to benefit most from my work. However, whether I like it or not, as a Professor in a research-intensive University, there is an expectation that I will be submitted as a 4* researcher, which means I need a few 4* papers as well.

You can see some more detailed thoughts on what I think makes 4* for different types of paper in this Tweet:

https://twitter.com/profmarkreed/status/801348612345253888/photo/1

As you’ll see from the discussion under that tweet though, my more detailed thoughts probably only apply to Units of Assessment across panels A-C, and probably isn’t relevant to the arts and humanities.

Having said this, I think there are a number of things we can all do to maximize the chances of our work being viewed favourably by REF panelists.

  1. Write to the criteria:when I was learning to drive, my instructor told me that in the test I should make sure I moved my head when I was looking in the rear view mirror, to make sure the examiner noticed I was using my mirrors. We’re all used to writing to the criteria of funding calls, and in fact we are all perfectly used to writing papers to the criteria of our target journals. In the last REF, research outputs were judged against three criteria: originality, significance and rigour. Whatever the interpretation of these criteria in your discipline, have you made it explicit to REF panelists reading your work exactly what is original, and why it is so original? Have you explained and effectively justified the significance of your work? And have you included evidence that your methods, analysis and interpretation is rigorous, even if you have to use supplementary material to include extra detail about your methods and data to get around journal word limits?
  2. Get REF feedback before you submit your work for publication:find out who is going to be reviewing research outputs for REF internally within your Unit of Assessment at your institution and ask them to review your work before you submit it. They may be able to make recommendations about how you might improve the paper in light of the REF criteria. Sometimes a little bit of extra work on the framing of your research in relation to wider contexts and issues can help articulate the significance of your work, and with additional reading and thinking, you may be able to position your work more effectively in relation to previous work to demonstrate its originality more clearly. Adding a few extra details to your methods and results may re-assure readers and reviewers that your approach is indeed rigorous. This is not just about doing world-leading research; it is about demonstrating to the world that your work is indeed world-leading. For me, these criteria are nothing new and are worth paying attention to, whether or not we are interested in REF. Meeting these three criteria will increase the chances that you get through peer-review and will increase the likelihood that your work gets cited.
  3. Analyse and discuss good practice in your own area: the only way to really “get your eye in” for REF is to actually look at examples of good and poor practice in your own area. Below, I’ve described how you can design an exercise to do this with your colleagues. You can do it yourself and learn a lot, but from my own experience, you learn a lot more by doing this as a discussion exercise with colleagues who work in your area. If you can, take notes from your discussion and try and distill some of the key lessons, so you can learn collectively as a group and more effectively review and support each other’s work.

How to organize a discussion to work out what makes a 4* paper in your area:

  • Identify top scoring institutions for your Unit of Assessment (UOA): download the REF2014 results, filter for your UOA (columns E or F), then filter so it only shows you the outputs (column J), and then filter for 4* (column L), showing only the institutions from your UOA that had the highest percentage of 4* outputs. Now for those institutions, look across the table (columns L-P) to see which has the highest proportion of outputs at either 3* or 4*. For example, an institution may have 80% of its outputs graded at 4* and 15% graded at 3*, meaning that 95% of its outputs were graded at 3-4*
  • Download a selection of papers from the top scoring institutions: go to your UOA on the REF website, find and click on the institutions you’ve identified in step 1, under “view submission data”, click on “research outputs”, copy and paste output titles into Google Scholar (or your search engine of choice) and download the articles. You may want to select outputs randomly, or you may want to go through more selectively, identifying outputs that are close to the areas your group specialize in
  • Repeat for low scoring institutions so you can compare and contrast high and low scoring outputs
  • Discuss examples: print copies of the high and low scoring outputs, labeled clearly, and in your next UOA meeting, let everyone choose a high and a low-scoring example. Given them 10-15 minutes to quickly read the outputs (focusing on title, abstract, introduction, figures and conclusions so you’re not there all day) and then ask the group (or small groups if there are many of you) to discuss the key factors that they think distinguish between high and low scoring outputs. Get your group(s) to distill the key principles that they think are most useful and disseminate these more widely to the group, so that anyone who wasn’t present can benefit.

It would be great if I could tell you that these are my “three easy ways to get a 4* paper” but doing work that is genuinely original, significant and rigorous is far from easy. If you have done work that is of the highest quality though, I hope that the ideas I’ve suggested here will help you get the credit you deserve for the great research you’ve done.


ESRC Festival of Social Science 2017 – Call for Proposals

ESRC Festival 15th Year BannerBuilding upon the successful collaboration from last year, University of Salford will partner with the Economic and Social Research Council, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University to deliver the ESRC Manchester Festival of Social Science.

The aim of the Festival is to showcase Manchester social science research to a broad non-academic audience. Last year we hosted an eclectic blend of activities designed to celebrate the social sciences, including discussions and debates, exhibitions, schools visits, workshops, and lots more.

The call for applications is now open. The Festival runs from 4-11 November and will involve academics working alongside community and cultural partners to create engaging and inspiring research-led events, aimed at a broadly non-academic audience. The goal is to provide an insight into the many ways social science contributes to social, economic and political life across our cities, regions and beyond.

Any researcher or team can apply to hold an event under the ESRC Festival banner. Applicants can also request up to £1,000 sponsorship from the University of Salford to hold an event as part of the Festival. This will also be an excellent opportunity to tag these events to the University’s 50th anniversary celebrations. Events must include social science and seek to engage groups outside of academia including young people, third sector organisations, business, local government, policy makers and the general public.

We particularly welcome applications that:

  • Seek to bring together two or more festival partners
  • Seek to deliver interdisciplinary events
  • Consider the role and future of social science as a discipline
  • Involve early career researchers
  • Address issues pertinent to the Manchester city-region

For inspiration and ideas for the kind of event you might run, you can find out about the 2016 events at www.esrcmanchesterfest.ac.uk

Please note, applications SHOULD NOT be made directly to the ESRC, but rather via the University of Salford. The application deadline is 4pm on Friday 5th of May. The application form and guidance can be requested through research-impact@salford.ac.uk.

Further details can be found on the ESRC website, including eligibility criteria: www.esrc.ac.uk/public-engagement/festival-of-social-science/apply-to-organise-an-event/

 


Publishing in Scholarly Journals

Peer review of scholarly writingAs a researcher, sharing your work is essential to furthering the discussion, development and potentially even funding of your findings. The sheer quantity of guides available on “how to write” and “how to target X journal” perhaps signifying the impact of targeting the right place and the best audience for your research.

Before reaching the stage of submitting in the hope of publication, many publishers expect researchers to have already made some key considerations:

  1. Is your research original, engaging, innovative?
  2. Who do you expect to be the audience for your research?
  3. Which journal(s) do you think might be interested in accepting your article for publication and does your article fit with their aims, scope and style?
  4. What are your open access needs?
  5. Is your manuscript suitably and well written (free from grammatical error, solid narrative, clear abstract and conclusions) in accordance with the journal’s style guide?

Your researching peers and foremost, your supervisor, are the best place to start for advice on where to publish and whether your manuscript is ready. Then, once you think you have found the right journal for your article, you should read their Author’s Guide and make sure you can freely submit to them as some journals are invitation-only.

Read more…..


Dean of NMSWSS Margaret Rowe joins Health Secretary on China trade mission

The University of Salford’s Dean of the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, met with Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt as part of trade visit to China to boost collaboration with the country’s health sector.Jeremy Hunt and Margaret Rowe

The visit is part of the week -long Department for International Trade (DIT) visit to Hangzhou, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Guangzhou.

Margaret is part of a large delegation of British health and social care providers and professionals who have travelled to China to explore opportunities for stronger collaboration between the two countries.

The DIT mission comes on the back of a recent report, Deepening Health Reform in China, jointly published by the World Bank, the Chinese Government and the World Health Organisation, which recommends that China moves away from its current hospital-centric model to one focussed on primary care and offering better value for money.

There is a strong willingness from the public and private sectors in China to work with UK companies, including training, education and research providers, to help develop, implement and manage services across the spectrum of care.

Delegates are meeting senior Chinese ministers and will be visiting new integrated care facilities and Shenzhen People’s Hospital, as well as taking part in a packed programme of seminars and workshops.

Margaret said: “The University of Salford is one of the largest trainers of nurses, midwives and allied health professionals in the North West, and this delegation was a wonderful opportunity to tell key figures in both the Chinese and British governments about the innovative work we are currently doing.

“I told the Secretary of State about how we collaborate with a wide range of industry partners across health and social care to produce highly skilled graduates, as well as how we work with stakeholders across the northern powerhouse to address the health outcomes arising from Devo Manc.

“I also outlined our strong partnership work with other North West universities and our plans for a private medical school to train the next generation of doctors and health professionals.”

In addition to the trade mission, Margaret is also visiting the Guangdong Food and Drug Vocational College on Friday to meet with their senior leadership team.

At a special graduation ceremony, she will present degree certificates to the first cohort of Chinese students who completed our Masters in Nursing programme.

Margaret added: “I am thrilled to be able to present graduation certificates to our new nurses in Guangdong.  We already have an excellent reputation with the Chinese health and social care sector and this visit will prove very useful in exploring how we can take this to the next level.”


Training method for caring with bereaved parents shortlisted

Mary Seacole BuildingAnne Leyland a Lecturer in Midwifery at the University of Salford, has been shortlisted for the Sands Award for Bereavement Care at the Royal College of Midwives’ Annual Midwifery Awards.

Anne devised the new method using the University’s extensive nursing and midwifery simulation suite because she said traditional teaching methods may not prepare students effectively to communicate sensitively and empathetically with parents who have experienced perinatal loss – the death of a baby in the womb or immediately after birth.

In the simulation scenario the midwifery students are assigned to support and care for the bereaved parents and respond to the concerns and anxieties they may have.

The parents’ parts are sometimes played by students from the Theatre and Performance Practice programme at the University’s School of Arts and Media.

The simulated scenario takes place in an area designed to look like a home birthing room and is streamed live and recorded so larger groups of students can watch. A debrief is then carried out by lecturers to help the students learn from and reflect on the experience.

The technique has received such positive feedback from students and health service colleagues that some NHS hospital trusts have discussed using it to provide additional training for their own staff.

Anne said: “Simulation offers us the ability to immerse students in a very realistic setting, so they’re able to play this out and think very deeply about the right things to say and do in that situation.

“This is absolutely devastating news for a pregnant woman and her partner, and the quality of the care they receive afterwards is crucial to their psychological recovery. The way the bereaved parents are treated by the health service can have a huge impact on them and on their future pregnancies.”

Anne will find out if she has won the award, sponsored by the Sands Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Charity, at the award ceremony held on 7 March 2017.

The birthing room is one of a number of simulated environments in the University’s Mary Seacole Building, including maternity units containing furniture from NHS suppliers along with electronic manikins representing birthing women which are able to move, speak and even blink and which can be controlled by skilled technicians.


SHUSU Student wins Green Gown Award

Danielle Butler

Danielle Butler

Established in 2004, the Green Gown Awards recognise the exceptional sustainability initiatives being undertaken by universities, colleges and the learning and skills sectors across the UK and Ireland as the education sector leads a path to efficiency, employability and better quality of life for us all.

The education sector is a critical player in ensuring the next generation is equipped with the skills and experience required to provide a sustainable future. The Green Gown Awards celebrate pioneers that are taking the bold steps that are necessary to develop resilience and adaptability and to showcase the education sector’s contribution to society.

Danielle Butler, PhD candidate in the Sustainable Housing and Urban Studies (SHUSU) unit, won in the Student Research category for her research which explored fuel poverty among young adult households. She was one of only three student research project finalists. You can watch a video about Danielle here.

The judging panel consisted of over 80 representatives from the diversity of the education sector and experts in the various fields, including Universities UK, Department of Energy and Climate Change, PwC, WWF and the United Nations Environment Programme.

The University of Salford also won for the Castle Irwell Flood Basin Project for the best Community award and was shortlisted with the Choose reUSe project in the Facilities and Services category.

For more information on the Green Gown Awards please contact Rebecca Bennett on 54071.


Martin Bull honoured by Academy of Social Sciences

Professor Martin BullCongratulations to Professor Martin Bull from the School of Arts & Media who was recently made a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.

Martin joins the latest list of distinguished social scientists to be conferred with the award. The new Fellows are drawn from across the spectrum of academia, practitioners and policymakers. They have been recognised for the excellence and impact of their work through the use of social science for public benefit. This includes substantial contributions and leadership in higher education, government, public health and social policy, funding councils, charitable foundations and think tanks.

Announcing the conferment, Professor Roger Goodman FAcSS, Chair of the Academy, said: “I am delighted that we have been able to confer a Fellowship on all these eminent social scientists. It is particularly gratifying to include a larger number of economists, policy makers and practitioners on this occasion. This is a result of our work to see representation from these areas increased to maintain balances between the individual disciplines and between academics and those working in the policy and practice communities. This gives the Academy legitimacy to speak on behalf of the social science community as a whole.”

A proud Martin added: “I am very pleased and honoured to be appointed as a Fellow to the Academy. In view of the current state of politics in advanced western democracies, there has never been a greater need for strong, inquisitive and impartial research in the political and social sciences, and the Academy is an essential means of us meeting that goal.”


eSports Symposium – The Digital Cluster

eSports Symposium 2016Last week our Media City UK campus hosted a one-day symposium on eSports – a £0.5bn industry which is growing all the time.

With a global audience of 226 million last year, eSports is big business with people tuning in to watch others play games including Call of Duty, League of Legends, Counter-Strike and Starcraft II.

The event was supported by a Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF) bid and is a great example of ICZs in action. Combining both sport and digital, it was organised in collaboration with industry partners and engaged Salford academics, along with leading industry figures from a number of different sectors.

The symposium, organised by The Digital Cluster (part of CARe) and the Centre for Sports Business, was very well attended with over 70 people present. Delegates ranged from top academics from across the UK to professionals from top football clubs and video game companies.

The programme on the day featured a panel discussion on the future of sport with profs. Garry Crawford and Andy Miah from the University of Salford and Trevor Keane from Celtic eSports League, as well as a keynote presentation on the development of eSports with Chester King, CEO of International eGames Group.

Prof Garry Crawford, who led the event, said: “eSports is a rapidly growing global phenomenon, but in many respects both industry and academics are still only starting to get to grips with the possibilities and opportunities this exciting new area offers.

“This conference was a key opportunity to engage academics and industry experts in discussing and envisaging the future of eSports, and also how this intersects with, and relates to, more traditional sports, such as football in the UK.”


Professor Garry Crawford becomes a Principal Fellow

Prof. Garry CrawfordCongratulations to Garry Crawford, Professor of Sociology, who was recently made a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (HEA).

Garry becomes the third person from the University to achieve this accolade, following Dr Sam Grogan, Pro Vice-Chancellor of Student Experience, who accomplished this 2014. He joins an elite group of under 500 Principal Fellows throughout the UK, all of which have given substantial strategic commitment to Higher Education.

“I am delighted that Garry’s achievements and profile have been recognised by the HEA and, on behalf of the University, offer sincere congratulations to him on becoming a Principal Fellow,” said Prof Richard Stephenson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor.

He added: “The Principal Fellowship is internationally recognised and reflects Garry’s commitment and professionalism in teaching and learning, including a sustained impact and influence through strategic engagement and leadership. Garry is the third person from the University to become a Principal Fellow and I would encourage academic colleagues to consider applying for this excellent external recognition through a HEA Fellowship relevant to their experience.”

Garry’s award was in recognition of the numerous leading roles and activities he has undertaken over his 20-year teaching career in both the HE and FE sectors. Not only has he has been a programme leader for several degrees but he has also designed many successful programmes including a distance learning master’s degree.

Garry has co-authored leading teaching textbooks such as Introducing Cultural Studies and The Sage Dictionary of Leisure Studies, both of which are used widely across the world in teaching. In addition, Garry is the editor and lead contributor to the Discover Sociology website which aims to provide learning material for teachers and students at pre-university level, and in doing so, encourages more to study the subject at university level.

“The number of HEA fellowships at the University of Salford, at all levels, is increasing all the time. I feel this is important as it recognises and reflects the high quality of teaching that is undertaken in this institution,” said Garry.

To find out more around becoming a Principal Fellow please visit the HEA website.

Click here to explore the Discover Sociology website.

Follow Professor Crawford on Twitter