Posts tagged: healthcare

Talking Teaching: Why I became a Principal Fellow – A blog post by Dr Jackie Leigh @JackieALeigh

Dr Jackie Leigh, Reader Teaching and Learning at the University of Salford, moved into academia from being a Senior Nurse Manager in the NHS. After qualifying as a registered nurse Jackie has since gained a BSc (Hons) in Nursing, MSc in Health Professional Education and completed her PhD in 2012.  In February 2017 she became a Principal Fellow of the HEA, as well as recently being awarded a prestigious HEA National Teaching Fellowship (NTF) in September. The NTF award recognises, rewards and celebrates individuals who have made an outstanding impact on student learning and the teaching profession.

I became an HEA Fellow in 1999, then a Senior Fellow in 2015. I thought I’d been in education a long time and that I met the criteria for Principal Fellow so decided to apply. It was a good time to start the process as it’s similar to the route of becoming a future professor in teaching and learning.

I’m the first Reader in Teaching and Learning, Nursing and Health Professional Education here at Salford and I’m a strong advocate for supporting healthcare workforce development through teaching and learning excellence. As a strategic champion here at the University and Non-Executive Director at Healthwatch Salford, I’m able to influence the healthcare services being developed to improve patient experience in Salford.

The process of applying for Principal Fellow was a very useful reflective practice for me, especially considering the impact of my teaching on the student experience and consequently on patients. Ultimately what we do at university level has to be about the needs of the patients.

The timing has been great due to the incredible synergy between becoming an NTF, Principal Fellow and receiving a University of Salford Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award. I feel I can now truly demonstrate the impact I’ve had at institutional and national level. It’s a win, win on both a personal and institutional level. For anyone seeking a chair in teaching and learning, I’d say becoming a Principal Fellow is a must; it gives you the evidence you need and is a great way of demonstrating national presence.

Since becoming National Teaching Fellow I’ve been working with the quality and enhancement team on academic leadership across the university which has been fantastic.

Becoming recognised through the Principal Fellowship definitely helps to open up a whole range of new opportunities. It’s really amazing what’s happened so far, and my recent award of a National Teaching Fellowship has also been fantastic.

I applied for National Teaching Fellow recognition so that I could showcase my achievements in teaching and learning, as well as emphasising my ability to enhance the student experience. I was also keen to highlight the quality of teaching at Salford and instil pride in both the nursing profession and student learning.

In the future I will continue to work with others to help them face the challenges of an evolving higher education system and the changes which are taking place within the field of nursing and health professional education.


Dean of NMSWSS Margaret Rowe joins Health Secretary on China trade mission

The University of Salford’s Dean of the School of Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work and Social Sciences, met with Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt as part of trade visit to China to boost collaboration with the country’s health sector.Jeremy Hunt and Margaret Rowe

The visit is part of the week -long Department for International Trade (DIT) visit to Hangzhou, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Guangzhou.

Margaret is part of a large delegation of British health and social care providers and professionals who have travelled to China to explore opportunities for stronger collaboration between the two countries.

The DIT mission comes on the back of a recent report, Deepening Health Reform in China, jointly published by the World Bank, the Chinese Government and the World Health Organisation, which recommends that China moves away from its current hospital-centric model to one focussed on primary care and offering better value for money.

There is a strong willingness from the public and private sectors in China to work with UK companies, including training, education and research providers, to help develop, implement and manage services across the spectrum of care.

Delegates are meeting senior Chinese ministers and will be visiting new integrated care facilities and Shenzhen People’s Hospital, as well as taking part in a packed programme of seminars and workshops.

Margaret said: “The University of Salford is one of the largest trainers of nurses, midwives and allied health professionals in the North West, and this delegation was a wonderful opportunity to tell key figures in both the Chinese and British governments about the innovative work we are currently doing.

“I told the Secretary of State about how we collaborate with a wide range of industry partners across health and social care to produce highly skilled graduates, as well as how we work with stakeholders across the northern powerhouse to address the health outcomes arising from Devo Manc.

“I also outlined our strong partnership work with other North West universities and our plans for a private medical school to train the next generation of doctors and health professionals.”

In addition to the trade mission, Margaret is also visiting the Guangdong Food and Drug Vocational College on Friday to meet with their senior leadership team.

At a special graduation ceremony, she will present degree certificates to the first cohort of Chinese students who completed our Masters in Nursing programme.

Margaret added: “I am thrilled to be able to present graduation certificates to our new nurses in Guangdong.  We already have an excellent reputation with the Chinese health and social care sector and this visit will prove very useful in exploring how we can take this to the next level.”


Local universities join forces to fight dementia

dementia

Photo credit: Chris Foster (University of Manchester)

Manchester, Salford and Manchester Metropolitan Universities are teaming up in a new initiative to combat dementia in the region and beyond.

To mark Dementia Awareness Week (May 15-21), leading researchers from the three institutions met at the Whitworth Gallery to open a series of collaborations around a range of dementia issues – from biology to social care.

Natalie Yates-Bolton, Director of the Dementia Institute at the University of Salford, said she believed that Manchester would be a model for the rest of the UK in dementia care. Read more…..