Posts tagged: Manchester Metropolitan University

Alternative Gardeners Question Time

ALTGQT Logo

There is a growing recognition that Green Care can positively influence health and well-being at an individual and community level. However, this knowledge has had limited reach to those who it may impact most in the community. The promotion of health and well-being through alternative approaches such as Green Care presents realistic, alternative methods. Our ‘Alternative Gardeners Question Time’, part of the 2017 ESRC Festival of Social Science, was designed to facilitate debate with local communities, charities, public health and environmental organisations about what constitutes significant health and well-being outcomes for the community and individual. This debate helped identify pertinent well-being outcomes that Green Care could provide for residents within Salford & Manchester.

Nature Based Activity in Salford

A diverse range of nature based activities and green care are located within Salford and surrounding geographical areas. The extent of this activity is currently unknown, the University of Salford is working with local organisations, and the RHS to map existing provision to enable a comprehensive picture of nature based work. Mapping existing provision will help to determine a more coordinated approach and enable CCGs, local authorities and public health to understand the extent of support and asset-based community nature-based approaches. This will help to develop a community referral process and support decision-making processes for those health and social care professionals who work in the NHS and community sector.

 

Event Structure

The Alternative Gardeners Question Time was structured in three parts:  sharing the science base about Green Care, discussing Green Care and key questions and, finally, developing questions for an expert panel for wider discussion.

ALTGQT Workshop

 

Further Information

The full report can be found here:  ALTGQT Report

 


Dementia Services: fit for purpose?

Finding out you have dementia is one thing, but then finding services are tailored for people who are much older than you can be an added blow. As researchers, we have found people with young onset dementia (before the age of 65) want to know things that they cannot readily find from existing services. For example, dementia is not just about memory loss and participants in our interviews said they wanted to know the ‘early warning signs’ of dementia so they knew what to look out for and seek help earlier. Others wanted greater psychological support at the point of diagnosis, ideally with someone to be there throughout their dementia journey such as a counsellor.

Some people with dementia felt that information about exercise and healthy activities was lacking and wanted more readily available information so they could make healthy lifestyle changes. This they believed would help them keep active and therefore independent for longer whilst preventing loneliness.

Family carers on the other hand felt peer support mechanisms were under-developed. They want help to identify practical and psychological coping strategies and they believe that carers have their own coping mechanisms but just need help to share them. A particular need was for greater information in a format that is digestible and timely.

This week sees the start of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Festival 2017. The ESRC Festival of Social Science takes place from 4-11 November with over 300 free events across the UK. The festival, now in its fifteenth year, is designed to promote awareness of social science research by enabling scientists to engage with the public through debates, talks, workshops, seminars, film screenings, theatre, exhibitions and much more. The festival is a unique opportunity for people to meet with some of the country’s leading social scientists and to discover more about the role research plays in their everyday life.

A full programme is available at www.esrc.ac.uk/festival. Join the discussion on Twitter using #esrcfestival. Logos for the festival can be downloaded from the ESRC website.

Our own ESRC event is a dementia services event on November 7th at Salford Museum & Art Gallery, being delivered jointly with Manchester Metropolitan University. As well as hearing about recent dementia services research at both universities, including that outlined above, we will be seeking audience views about services and their tips for others living with dementia.

For example, family carers have told us they can better support each other by sharing positive statements such as these:

“You cannot control the illness – it is OK to step back”

“Take calculated risks”

“Accept when you need help”

“Put yourself first sometimes”

“It’s OK to get it wrong”

 

Possible ‘early warning signs’ which carers and people living with young onset dementia said to look out for and seek help about include:

“When you can’t find the words”

“Needing reminding”

“Covering up through joking”

“Writing down instructions wrongly”

“Getting lost on a familiar route”

“When the above become regular or a problem”

 

We need other examples of positive statements to include in a booklet and video we are producing as an output from our Young Onset Dementia study funded by the Booth Charities Salford. We are also consulting on other ‘early warning signs’. If you have experiences of young onset dementia and/or want to hear more about involvement in our study you can contact Dr Tracey Williamson on T.Williamson@salford.ac.uk or tel 0161 295 6424. We especially need to interview people from less heard populations living with young onset dementia.

 

Blog author: Dr Tracey Williamson, Salford Institute for Dementia, School of Health & Society, University of Salford

Acknowledgements: Young Onset Dementia study Advisory Group and research team – Luisa Rabanal, Dr John Chatwin, Chris Sewards, Andy Walker, Maria O’Sullivan. MMU research team led by Prof Josie Tetley 


ESRC Festival of Social Science 2017 – Call for Proposals

ESRC Festival 15th Year BannerBuilding upon the successful collaboration from last year, University of Salford will partner with the Economic and Social Research Council, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University to deliver the ESRC Manchester Festival of Social Science.

The aim of the Festival is to showcase Manchester social science research to a broad non-academic audience. Last year we hosted an eclectic blend of activities designed to celebrate the social sciences, including discussions and debates, exhibitions, schools visits, workshops, and lots more.

The call for applications is now open. The Festival runs from 4-11 November and will involve academics working alongside community and cultural partners to create engaging and inspiring research-led events, aimed at a broadly non-academic audience. The goal is to provide an insight into the many ways social science contributes to social, economic and political life across our cities, regions and beyond.

Any researcher or team can apply to hold an event under the ESRC Festival banner. Applicants can also request up to £1,000 sponsorship from the University of Salford to hold an event as part of the Festival. This will also be an excellent opportunity to tag these events to the University’s 50th anniversary celebrations. Events must include social science and seek to engage groups outside of academia including young people, third sector organisations, business, local government, policy makers and the general public.

We particularly welcome applications that:

  • Seek to bring together two or more festival partners
  • Seek to deliver interdisciplinary events
  • Consider the role and future of social science as a discipline
  • Involve early career researchers
  • Address issues pertinent to the Manchester city-region

For inspiration and ideas for the kind of event you might run, you can find out about the 2016 events at www.esrcmanchesterfest.ac.uk

Please note, applications SHOULD NOT be made directly to the ESRC, but rather via the University of Salford. The application deadline is 4pm on Friday 5th of May. The application form and guidance can be requested through research-impact@salford.ac.uk.

Further details can be found on the ESRC website, including eligibility criteria: www.esrc.ac.uk/public-engagement/festival-of-social-science/apply-to-organise-an-event/

 


The economic & commercial contribution of sport to Manchester, the region, Britain & beyond (Manchester: A Global Centre of Sport, Part 3)

ESCR-Festival logo

Sport, sport and more sport. Get inside the commercial and economic contribution that it makes to Manchester and beyond.

Manchester has developed an international reputation as being a home to high quality, world-class sport. Whether it is the global fanbase of United and City or the performances of British Cycling, everyone knows about Manchester. Sport therefore makes an important economic and commercial contribution to the city, the regions and indeed to Britain and beyond. The main aim of this event will be to examine the nature of this contribution, to discuss ways in which the contribution of sport can be further strengthened and to explore the role of the public can play in doing this.

This event will bring in top people from sport to explain how the economic and commercial well-being is linked to the city’s sporting profile and successes.

This is part of a series of football-themed events on the same date and in the same venue.  Refreshments are available from 5pm, followed at 5.30pm by a session led by Manchester Metropolitan University on the socio-cultural impact of football in Manchester.  An event led by the University of Manchester on stadium renaming is at 6.30pm and is then followed at 7.30pm by this session, led by Salford University, on the commercial impact of football.  Refreshments and opportunities for networking are available at 8.15pm.  Registration for each event is separate but attendees are welcome to attend as many of the events as they wish.

Date/Time
07 November 2016
7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Location
University of Salford – Media City Campus
Media City
Salford
M50 2HE

Register at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/manchester-a-global-centre-of-sport-registration-26748430275


The ‘Green Infrastructure and the Health and Wellbeing Influences on an Ageing Population’ project

Photograph of people walking in a park

The University of Salford is partnering with the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University on a £700,000 research project that looks into the benefits and values of green infrastructure on an ageing population.

Green infrastructure (GI), a term used in reference to green and blue spaces (areas of grass, and canals or waterways), has direct and indirect influences on human health and wellbeing. However access to such health and wellbeing benefits isn’t shared equally amongst the population, particularly for those based in urban areas. Additionally with people aged 65 and over more susceptible to environmental stressors, this age group in particular may also be the least likely to benefit from GI.

Read more…..