Posts tagged: School of Health & Society

PhD Studentship in the area of Digital Health or Integrated Care in the School of Health and Society/School of Health Sciences, University of Salford. Start Date – End of September 2018.

 

About the Schools

The Schools of Health and Society and Health Sciences are forward-thinking, dynamic schools with a commitment to lifelong learning and real world impact by focusing on the health and wellbeing of people and helping them at all stages of their lives.  In September 2018 the Schools will be merging to create one School.  These studentships offer a chance to bring together interests across the Schools.

We are focused on developing our knowledge and understanding, so we can actively help people, our clients, to lead more productive, comfortable lives. We have a fantastic range of facilities which reflect those in practice and focus on new technologies and pioneering techniques.

https://www.salford.ac.uk/health-and-society

https://www.salford.ac.uk/health-sciences

 

About our research

Our research underpins our teaching and learning, ensuring our staff, students and partner organisations reach their full potential and remain at the forefront of innovation.

Research is organised into two Centres:

 

  • Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy (CaRe)

https://www.salford.ac.uk/research/care

 

  • Centre for Health Sciences Research

https://www.salford.ac.uk/research/health-sciences

 

More details regarding our research and our research staff (and their interests) can be found on the above websites.

 

About the studentships

Applications for PhD studentships are sought in the areas of Digital Health or Integrated Care.  It is expected that applicants will possess a minimum 2.1 degree in a relevant subject area. A higher degree qualification would be desirable.

Experienced supervisors will be provided from across the Schools.  Proposals that fall within these themes will be considered and prospective students are expected to provide a focus to the proposal and may consult with prospective supervisors prior to application.

The studentship will include 3 years full time fees and a tax free scholarship of £14,553 per annum (for 3 years).  Successful students will be expected to contribute to the success of the School in terms of timely progression and contribution to the production of research outputs or teaching during their candidature.

The University of Salford provides an extensive training programme for PhD candidates as part of the Doctoral School and at School Level within the Schools of Health and Society and Health Sciences.  Training includes compulsory induction and ethics and an introductory “Getting Started Week”.

 

About the application procedure

Application is online.  Applicants must provide evidence of their existing knowledge and experience in the chosen topic area in a formal Research Proposal and supplementary CV.

The proposal should contain:  1. A summary of relevant literature related to the proposed project 2. Aims of the proposed research 3. An outline the key research methods proposed to appropriately address the aims. This document should be 3-4 sides of typed A4.

Further details about the procedure are available at: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying/applying-for-research

Applications will pass through an initial filter stage and then an interview prior to a final offer.

 

Timelines

Deadline for receipt of online application:  31st July 2018

Interviews:  Interviews will be held w/c 20th August

Offers:  Informal offer will be communicated by 27th August

Registration and start:  Registration w/c 24th September

Induction and Getting Started Week:  w/c 3rd October (TBC)

 

Integrated Care

Further details regarding the Integrated Care agenda across Greater Manchester can be found at: http://www.gmhsc.org.uk/

 

For further information please contact:

Louise Brown, PGR Support:  PGR-SupportSHAS@salford.ac.uk or PGR-SupportHS@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 6345

Professor Alison Brettle, PGR Director, School of Health and Society:  a.brettle@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 0447

Dr Yeliz Prior, PGR Director, School of Health Sciences: y.prior@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 0211


Salford Professor announced as Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences

Professor Garry CrawfordA leading scholar in sociology and criminology specialising in audiences, consumers, technology, fans, sport and games has been conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.Garry Crawford, Professor within the School of Health & Society is one of 58 leading social scientists awarded the Fellowship this year. He is only the fifth at Salford, including our former Vice-Chancellor Professor Michael Harlow, to have received this honour.

The new Fellows are drawn from academics, practitioners and policymakers across the social sciences. They have been recognised after an extensive peer review process for the excellence and impact of their work through the use of social science for public benefit. Garry was nominated for the Fellowship by the Leisure Studies Association for his contribution to the field of digital leisure.

It’s been a pretty momentous week for Garry, who has also just released a book around the culture of Video Games.

Announcing the conferment, Professor Roger Goodman FAcSS, Chair of the Academy said:

“Each new Fellow has made an outstanding contribution in their respective field and together they demonstrate the vital role played by social science in addressing some of our most pressing public issues.

We are delighted to welcome them to the Academy.”

Speaking about the announcement, Garry said: “It really is an honour to be conferred a Fellowship of the Academy alongside so many great scholars.”

Garry is a Professor of Cultural Sociology, a Director of the University of Salford Digital Cluster and has authored eight books. He has worked at the University for ten years and is a proud alumnus, having graduated from Salford in 1995 with a degree in Sociology.

In addition to his University position, Garry is review editor for the journal Cultural Sociology.

A full listing of all new Fellows can be found on the Academy of Social Sciences website.


Dementia Services: fit for purpose?

Finding out you have dementia is one thing, but then finding services are tailored for people who are much older than you can be an added blow. As researchers, we have found people with young onset dementia (before the age of 65) want to know things that they cannot readily find from existing services. For example, dementia is not just about memory loss and participants in our interviews said they wanted to know the ‘early warning signs’ of dementia so they knew what to look out for and seek help earlier. Others wanted greater psychological support at the point of diagnosis, ideally with someone to be there throughout their dementia journey such as a counsellor.

Some people with dementia felt that information about exercise and healthy activities was lacking and wanted more readily available information so they could make healthy lifestyle changes. This they believed would help them keep active and therefore independent for longer whilst preventing loneliness.

Family carers on the other hand felt peer support mechanisms were under-developed. They want help to identify practical and psychological coping strategies and they believe that carers have their own coping mechanisms but just need help to share them. A particular need was for greater information in a format that is digestible and timely.

This week sees the start of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Festival 2017. The ESRC Festival of Social Science takes place from 4-11 November with over 300 free events across the UK. The festival, now in its fifteenth year, is designed to promote awareness of social science research by enabling scientists to engage with the public through debates, talks, workshops, seminars, film screenings, theatre, exhibitions and much more. The festival is a unique opportunity for people to meet with some of the country’s leading social scientists and to discover more about the role research plays in their everyday life.

A full programme is available at www.esrc.ac.uk/festival. Join the discussion on Twitter using #esrcfestival. Logos for the festival can be downloaded from the ESRC website.

Our own ESRC event is a dementia services event on November 7th at Salford Museum & Art Gallery, being delivered jointly with Manchester Metropolitan University. As well as hearing about recent dementia services research at both universities, including that outlined above, we will be seeking audience views about services and their tips for others living with dementia.

For example, family carers have told us they can better support each other by sharing positive statements such as these:

“You cannot control the illness – it is OK to step back”

“Take calculated risks”

“Accept when you need help”

“Put yourself first sometimes”

“It’s OK to get it wrong”

 

Possible ‘early warning signs’ which carers and people living with young onset dementia said to look out for and seek help about include:

“When you can’t find the words”

“Needing reminding”

“Covering up through joking”

“Writing down instructions wrongly”

“Getting lost on a familiar route”

“When the above become regular or a problem”

 

We need other examples of positive statements to include in a booklet and video we are producing as an output from our Young Onset Dementia study funded by the Booth Charities Salford. We are also consulting on other ‘early warning signs’. If you have experiences of young onset dementia and/or want to hear more about involvement in our study you can contact Dr Tracey Williamson on T.Williamson@salford.ac.uk or tel 0161 295 6424. We especially need to interview people from less heard populations living with young onset dementia.

 

Blog author: Dr Tracey Williamson, Salford Institute for Dementia, School of Health & Society, University of Salford

Acknowledgements: Young Onset Dementia study Advisory Group and research team – Luisa Rabanal, Dr John Chatwin, Chris Sewards, Andy Walker, Maria O’Sullivan. MMU research team led by Prof Josie Tetley