Posts tagged: University of Manchester

ESRC Festival of Social Science 2017 – Call for Proposals

ESRC Festival 15th Year BannerBuilding upon the successful collaboration from last year, University of Salford will partner with the Economic and Social Research Council, the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University to deliver the ESRC Manchester Festival of Social Science.

The aim of the Festival is to showcase Manchester social science research to a broad non-academic audience. Last year we hosted an eclectic blend of activities designed to celebrate the social sciences, including discussions and debates, exhibitions, schools visits, workshops, and lots more. read more


The economic & commercial contribution of sport to Manchester, the region, Britain & beyond (Manchester: A Global Centre of Sport, Part 3)

ESCR-Festival logo

Sport, sport and more sport. Get inside the commercial and economic contribution that it makes to Manchester and beyond.

Manchester has developed an international reputation as being a home to high quality, world-class sport. Whether it is the global fanbase of United and City or the performances of British Cycling, everyone knows about Manchester. Sport therefore makes an important economic and commercial contribution to the city, the regions and indeed to Britain and beyond. The main aim of this event will be to examine the nature of this contribution, to discuss ways in which the contribution of sport can be further strengthened and to explore the role of the public can play in doing this. read more


Lessons in Self-Care Method May Help Osteoarthritis Sufferers

An educational approach aimed at reducing muscle tension and improving postural support has the potential to help millions of people suffering osteoarthritis in their knees, according to researchers.

Academics from our Centre for Health Science Research studied the effect of one-to-one lessons in the Alexander Technique on a group of 21 patients suffering knee pain caused by osteoarthritis.

The Alexander Technique teaches people to become more aware of their own habits – from slouching while standing to inappropriately tensing leg and back muscles while performing daily tasks – and lessons are aimed at improving movement coordination and reducing the muscular tension that has accumulated over a lifetime.

This pilot study, published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, jointly carried out with the University of Manchester’s Human Pain Research Group based at Salford Royal Hospital and University College London’s Institute of Neurology, found the sessions led to a reduction in damaging knee muscle contractions.

Although Alexander Technique lessons are a well-known means of helping people with conditions such as back pain, this is the first time researchers have looked into whether this approach can have any effect on knee osteoarthritis.

The patients – aged from 40-70 and recruited from GPs across Greater Manchester – each attended 20 one to one lessons in the Technique over a period of 12 weeks and were encouraged to continue applying the skills they had learned as they went about their daily activities.

They were tested on a range of factors before and after the sessions, while the same tests were also carried out with a healthy control group of people who were


The ‘Green Infrastructure and the Health and Wellbeing Influences on an Ageing Population’ project

Photograph of people walking in a park

The University of Salford is partnering with the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University on a £700,000 research project that looks into the benefits and values of green infrastructure on an ageing population.

Green infrastructure (GI), a term used in reference to green and blue spaces (areas of grass, and canals or waterways), has direct and indirect influences on human health and wellbeing. However access to such health and wellbeing benefits isn’t shared equally amongst the population, particularly for those based in urban areas. Additionally with people aged 65 and over more susceptible to environmental stressors, this age group in particular may also be the least likely to benefit from GI.