Posts tagged: Vice Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award

Talking Teaching: Why I became a Principal Fellow – A blog post by Dr Jackie Leigh @JackieALeigh

Dr Jackie Leigh, Reader Teaching and Learning at the University of Salford, moved into academia from being a Senior Nurse Manager in the NHS. After qualifying as a registered nurse Jackie has since gained a BSc (Hons) in Nursing, MSc in Health Professional Education and completed her PhD in 2012.  In February 2017 she became a Principal Fellow of the HEA, as well as recently being awarded a prestigious HEA National Teaching Fellowship (NTF) in September. The NTF award recognises, rewards and celebrates individuals who have made an outstanding impact on student learning and the teaching profession.

I became an HEA Fellow in 1999, then a Senior Fellow in 2015. I thought I’d been in education a long time and that I met the criteria for Principal Fellow so decided to apply. It was a good time to start the process as it’s similar to the route of becoming a future professor in teaching and learning.

I’m the first Reader in Teaching and Learning, Nursing and Health Professional Education here at Salford and I’m a strong advocate for supporting healthcare workforce development through teaching and learning excellence. As a strategic champion here at the University and Non-Executive Director at Healthwatch Salford, I’m able to influence the healthcare services being developed to improve patient experience in Salford.

The process of applying for Principal Fellow was a very useful reflective practice for me, especially considering the impact of my teaching on the student experience and consequently on patients. Ultimately what we do at university level has to be about the needs of the patients.

The timing has been great due to the incredible synergy between becoming an NTF, Principal Fellow and receiving a University of Salford Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award. I feel I can now truly demonstrate the impact I’ve had at institutional and national level. It’s a win, win on both a personal and institutional level. For anyone seeking a chair in teaching and learning, I’d say becoming a Principal Fellow is a must; it gives you the evidence you need and is a great way of demonstrating national presence.

Since becoming National Teaching Fellow I’ve been working with the quality and enhancement team on academic leadership across the university which has been fantastic.

Becoming recognised through the Principal Fellowship definitely helps to open up a whole range of new opportunities. It’s really amazing what’s happened so far, and my recent award of a National Teaching Fellowship has also been fantastic.

I applied for National Teaching Fellow recognition so that I could showcase my achievements in teaching and learning, as well as emphasising my ability to enhance the student experience. I was also keen to highlight the quality of teaching at Salford and instil pride in both the nursing profession and student learning.

In the future I will continue to work with others to help them face the challenges of an evolving higher education system and the changes which are taking place within the field of nursing and health professional education.


Vice Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award 2015-2016 – Andrew Tootell

Photograph of Andrew Tootell with VC Teaching Award

On 8th June Andrew received the Vice Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award for the academic year 2015-2016. Andrew is a lecturer in the School of Health Sciences, Directorate of Radiography. He has been Programme Leader for the MSc Nuclear Medicine Imaging for 7 years. He teaches on the Nuclear Medicine MSc, BSc (Hons) Radiography and dental x-ray programme. He was nominated for this award partly because of his passion for his specialist subject. Students at all levels acknowledge his ‘special abilities’ in making challenging subjects understandable to a diverse range of students, many of whom have limited prior knowledge of the subjects. Dr Fred Murphy, Programme Leader for the BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography programme, noted

Over the last few years I have had many conversations with students stating that Andrew is brilliant at explaining some complex physics in a simple manner. He uses lots of props and analogies which the students find easy to understand.   This is an important skill for a lecturer dealing with level 4 students of different backgrounds.

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