My name is Sophia Carey and I am in my final year of the BA (Hons) Graphic Design programme.

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, as a photographer, my practice relied mostly on meeting other people and collaborating physically. Since the lockdown was enforced, I’m having to consider new ways of staying creative and earning a living. 

I’ve turned my focus more towards creating educational content — videos and tutorials — that can be consumed online as well as dabbling in different niches, such as product photography. I’m also using my graphic design and lens-based skills to be able to offer other services to my clients that can be done from self-isolation: photo and video editing, graphic design services, etc. 

I’ve turned the dining room table of my flat into a make-shift office, which was probably a long time coming anyway, and am definitely finding new ways to make working from home that little bit more bearable.

Throughout the lockdown, I’ve definitely had to work in ways that I’m unfamiliar with. It’s forced me to work a lot more flexibly and I’m trying to deal with the pandemic as positively as possible. I’m trying to stay motivated and see the lockdown as a blessing in disguise; an opportunity to spend time on aspects of my practice that were otherwise being neglected. I’ve been able to spend time learning and practising new skills and disciplines, especially in videography and video editing, that I had wanted to learn but hadn’t given myself the time to.

As a part of my final project for my degree, I’m creating a series of videos about my hometown. Even though I’m still living in Salford now, I had captured all of the material before lockdown and so I’ve been spending the last few weeks editing it all together.

This time out has definitely shifted my mindset into appreciating my practice more. I’ve realised that the perimeters of my job are only set there by myself and there’s no reasons why I can’t push the creative boundaries of my work further out as I continue to work. I’m looking forward to going back to work and resuming a sense of normality in my practice, but I’ve also enjoyed the challenge of having to adapt to these circumstances.