Jun 21 2018

Festival of Research Logo

Health Sciences Research Centre Programme

How to find us: Please follow this link to find us at media city: http://www.salford.ac.uk/mediacityuk/location

Tuesday 3rd July

Virtual Reality: Virtual Reality and Mental Health (03/07/18, 09:30-10:30, Media City 2.03)

While offering great potential in mental health, Virtual Reality (VR) is a powerful tool that could be counterproductive if used bluntly. This talk looks at the incentives and hurdles to take up and use of VR with vulnerable populations. It is given by someone who has developed and studied the use of VR for over two decades. VR can provide tailored, controllable and repeatable stimuli to which people react as if it were real, even when knowing it’s not. This capability has application across understanding, diagnosing, treating and living with a range of mental and psychological problems. For example, within therapy it has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of both phobias and PTSD and is being used as an aid to reminisce in dementia. Yet using a technology that blurs boundary between what is real and what is not, should not be used carelessly with those whose condition also blurs this boundary. The talk describes our investigation of how VR exposure therapy works with the mind and fits within the way health professional work with the vulnerable. It concludes with a description of how this understanding has helped to develop a novel VR exposure therapy used within the NHS to treat some of the victims of the Manchester Arena attack.

Biomedical Engineering: Rehabilitation Technologies and Biomedical Engineering Research @ Salford (03/07/18, 10:30-11:30, Media City 2.03)

Rehabilitation Technologies and Biomedical Engineering is a thriving, cross-school research group, jointly led by Professors David Howard (Computing, Science and Engineering) and Laurence Kenney (Health Sciences). We focus on the design and development of new rehabilitation technologies aimed at assisting functional movement, together with novel methods for their evaluation.  Our current research is supported by ~£1.9 million in external grants from NIHR, EPSRC and charities. We will demonstrate some of our latest research, which includes:

  • Controlled energy storage and return in prosthetic limbs to improve amputee gait.
  • A novel and rigorous approach to assessing stability of people using walking aids.
  • A flexible and easy to setup controller for upper limb functional electrical stimulation (FES).
  • Novel approaches to understanding user-assistive device interaction (with psychologists Galpin, Gowen and Bowen)
  • Award winning research on monitoring assistive device use outside of the clinic.

Foot and Ankle: Foot health and industry – from our lab to your feet (03/07/18, 11:30-12:00, Media City 2.03)

Healthy feet are central to keeping mobile and poor foot health can lead to very significant loss of independence. Caring for poorly feet can be expensive too: 1% of the entire NHS budget goes on care of feet affected by diabetes. Without knowing it we make foot health choices each and every day, when we choose our socks and footwear, and then go about our daily activities. Common but often significant foot problems can be adequately managed with the need for a health professional, but equally the input of professionals and can life saving in some cases – literally. Our research has sought to connect what we know about foot health, foot biomechanics and foot disease to the design, development and use of footwear and insoles, and over the counter foot health treatments too. Working with leading global foot health brands, UK footwear manufacturers, and supporting the design of footwear for children and use in unique workplaces, we aim to help everyone make better foot health choices each day.

Occupational Therapy: Occupational Therapy at Salford – How we are contributing to the evidence base (03/07/18, 13:00-14:00, Media City 2.03)

Occupational therapy facilitates health and well-being through the therapeutic use of meaningful and purposeful activities. We believe that occupational balance and justice enables individuals of all ages to achieve their full potential in their everyday lives and communities. A high proportion of our research has an emphasis on improving health and well-being in later life, for example, managing widowhood and care-giving, safe moving, handling and positioning to increase independence and functional performance in activities of daily living. As an emerging group we are involved in a range of projects within the School of Health Sciences, across the University and with partners in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

This session will provide an overview of our research topics including innovations in moving and handling training (research informed teaching), development of the new Tissue Viability Seating Guidelines and the The Home Modification Process Protocol, Service user engagement in occupational therapy and exploring the roles of fathers who have an adult with a learning disability. Practical demonstrations of pressure mapping systems used in a number of studies exploring the impact of different seating and bed surfaces on pressure ulcer development risk and comfort are available.

Equity, Health and Well-being: Putting communities in charge of alcohol: a health champion model (03/07/18, 14:00-15:00, Media City 2.03)

The session will start with a brief overview of the research of the Equity, Health and Wellbeing research group. An interactive discussion will follow, which will look at issues around developing community capacity to influence health behavioural change. It will outline how an asset based community development (ABCD) approach to improving health outcomes is being implemented across Greater Manchester and how it is being evaluated. It will explore the barriers and facilitators to implementing an ABCD approach to improving health outcomes. Experienced researchers will discuss current work underway. They will show some short films that have been made of the experience of professionals and volunteers developing knowledge and skills as alcohol health champions and the benefits experienced to date. The researchers will canvas the views and opinions of those attending the event, about the role of stakeholders, laypeople and community organisations in championing healthy lifestyle changes.

Clinical Rehabilitation: Development of an online self-management platform for people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal conditions (mskhub.com) (03/07/18, 15:00-16:00, Media City 2.03)

Patient information and education have been shown to improve pain and self-efficacy and increase overall quality of life in people with chronic musculoskeletal conditions (MSCs). Informed patients are better able to distinguish and manage symptoms, use treatments effectively, access services needed, manage work and cope better with the psychological impact of their conditions. However, there is a need to improve the access to high quality specialist health information for people with rheumatic and MSCs. This presentation by Dr Yeliz Prior will provide an insight into the development and testing of an online self-management platform, the MSKHUB.com for people with rheumatic and MSCs. This platform aims to facilitate access to (i) valid and reliable health information (ii) evidence-based Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) (iii) advice on self-help, assistive technologies and rehabilitation and (iv) peer support, and will be freely accessible for people with rheumatic and MSCs.

Wednesday 4th July

Knee Biomechanics: Using clinical biomechanics in knee injury and disease (04/07/18, 09:30-10:30, Media City 2.03)

Objective data collection is important in determining where an individual’s functional impairments lie in musculoskeletal research. This can be either in terms of the risk of injury, rehabilitation from injury or in the treatment of degenerative disease. The talk will give an overview of the knee biomechanics and injury research programme at the University where we are investigating risk factors for injury, risk mitigation programs and also rehabilitation approaches (therapeutic and also assistive devices) in the management of musculoskeletal and degenerative disorders. Utilising clinical biomechanics where we collect movement and loading data on individuals helps us to determine which tasks, strategies and treatments are best suited to the individual.

Virtual Reality: Virtual Reality and Mental Health (04/07/18, 10:30-11:30, Media City 2.03)

While offering great potential in mental health, Virtual Reality (VR) is a powerful tool that could be counterproductive if used bluntly. This talk looks at the incentives and hurdles to take up and use of VR with vulnerable populations. It is given by someone who has developed and studied the use of VR for over two decades. VR can provide tailored, controllable and repeatable stimuli to which people react as if it were real, even when knowing it’s not. This capability has application across understanding, diagnosing, treating and living with a range of mental and psychological problems. For example, within therapy it has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of both phobias and PTSD and is being used as an aid to reminisce in dementia. Yet using a technology that blurs boundary between what is real and what is not, should not be used carelessly with those whose condition also blurs this boundary. The talk describes our investigation of how VR exposure therapy works with the mind and fits within the way health professional work with the vulnerable. It concludes with a description of how this understanding has helped to develop a novel VR exposure therapy used within the NHS to treat some of the victims of the Manchester Arena attack.

PGR Director for Health Sciences: Director and student presentations (04/07/18, 11:30-12:30, Media City 2.03)

Occupational Therapy: Occupational Therapy at Salford – How we are contributing to the evidence base (04/07/18, 13:00-14:00, Media City 2.03)

Occupational therapy facilitates health and well-being through the therapeutic use of meaningful and purposeful activities. We believe that occupational balance and justice enables individuals of all ages to achieve their full potential in their everyday lives and communities. A high proportion of our research has an emphasis on improving health and well-being in later life, for example, managing widowhood and care-giving, safe moving, handling and positioning to increase independence and functional performance in activities of daily living. As an emerging group we are involved in a range of projects within the School of Health Sciences, across the University and with partners in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

This session will provide an overview of our research topics including innovations in moving and handling training (research informed teaching), development of the new Tissue Viability Seating Guidelines and the The Home Modification Process Protocol, Service user engagement in occupational therapy and exploring the roles of fathers who have an adult with a learning disability. Practical demonstrations of pressure mapping systems used in a number of studies exploring the impact of different seating and bed surfaces on pressure ulcer development risk and comfort are available.

ICZ Director Talks: Caitriona O’shea, ICZ Sport Director (04/07/18, 14:00-15:00, Media City 2.03)

Diagnostic Imaging: How can medical imaging research benefit patients? (04/07/18, 15:00-16:00, Media City 2.03)

Medical imaging examinations, X-rays and CT scans, involve the use of radiation.  The use of radiation carries with it well known risks but these are necessary in order to diagnose illness and disease.  The amount of radiation used during a medical imaging examination must be balanced against the need to produce images of sufficient diagnostic quality.  Balancing radiation dose and image quality can be a difficult task and is affected by the type of imaging technology, disease under investigation and the size or characteristics of the patient.  Within the Directorate of Radiography at the University of Salford, we have a well-established portfolio of research which seeks to improve the diagnosis of disease whilst minimising any associated risks.  Our research portfolio focuses specifically into the areas of conventional radiography, CT scanning and digital mammography.  Our research group has published in leading international journals and we have a number of Masters and Doctoral students undertaking projects within these areas.

Thursday 5th July

Psychology: Applications of psychology to real world, contemporary issues (05/07/18, 09:30-10:30, Media City 2.03)

The Psychology team at the University of Salford has a diverse range of interests and expertise. Our focus is applying psychology to real-world problems in order to maximise performance and wellbeing. The research we conduct is often multi-disciplinary and many members of the team have experience of working with non-academic partners. This session will provide an overview of our research topics and strengths within the areas of Applied Social Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology, and Health. We will also provide a demonstration of how we are using research techniques such as eye tracking to explore issues within health, education, and the media.

Equity, Health and Well-being: Putting communities in charge of alcohol: a health champion model (05/07/18, 10:30-11:30, Media City 2.03)

The session will start with a brief overview of the research of the Equity, Health and Wellbeing research group. An interactive discussion will follow, which will look at issues around developing community capacity to influence health behavioural change. It will outline how an asset based community development (ABCD) approach to improving health outcomes is being implemented across Greater Manchester and how it is being evaluated. It will explore the barriers and facilitators to implementing an ABCD approach to improving health outcomes. Experienced researchers will discuss current work underway. They will show some short films that have been made of the experience of professionals and volunteers developing knowledge and skills as alcohol health champions and the benefits experienced to date. The researchers will canvas the views and opinions of those attending the event, about the role of stakeholders, laypeople and community organisations in championing healthy lifestyle changes.

Diagnostic Imaging: How can medical imaging research benefit patients? (05/07/18, 13:00-14:00, Media City 2.03)

Medical imaging examinations, X-rays and CT scans, involve the use of radiation.  The use of radiation carries with it well known risks but these are necessary in order to diagnose illness and disease.  The amount of radiation used during a medical imaging examination must be balanced against the need to produce images of sufficient diagnostic quality.  Balancing radiation dose and image quality can be a difficult task and is affected by the type of imaging technology, disease under investigation and the size or characteristics of the patient.  Within the Directorate of Radiography at the University of Salford, we have a well-established portfolio of research which seeks to improve the diagnosis of disease whilst minimising any associated risks.  Our research portfolio focuses specifically into the areas of conventional radiography, CT scanning and digital mammography.  Our research group has published in leading international journals and we have a number of Masters and Doctoral students undertaking projects within these areas.

ICZ Director Talks: Andrew Spencer, ICZ Health, Wellbeing & Society Director (05/07/18, 14:00-15:00, Media City 2.03)

SPARC Parallel Session Talks 3.4 (05/07/18, 14:30-15:30, Media City 2.03)

Psychology: Applications of psychology to real world, contemporary issues (05/07/18, 15:00-16:00, Media City 2.03)

The Psychology team at the University of Salford has a diverse range of interests and expertise. Our focus is applying psychology to real-world problems in order to maximise performance and wellbeing. The research we conduct is often multi-disciplinary and many members of the team have experience of working with non-academic partners. This session will provide an overview of our research topics and strengths within the areas of Applied Social Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology, and Health. We will also provide a demonstration of how we are using research techniques such as eye tracking to explore issues within health, education, and the media.

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Jun 18 2018

Salford is holding its inaugural Festival of Research this year between 25th June and 20th July 2018 across the campus.

The aim of the Festival is to showcase and celebrate Salford’s diverse research and its impact to a wider audience and will encourage both researchers and the general public to become involved.

In the week of 2nd-6th July there will be a concentration of physical events and conferences taking place, including the Salford Postgraduate Annual Researcher Conference (SPARC), which is a two-day PGR-focused showcase event.

Running alongside the Festival will be ‘Storytelling at Salford’: this is a larger project which forms part of the research training strategy and which is also linked to the University’s new research strategy. It involves the Salford Research community (PGRs, Academics and Leaders) recording short videos about what they do at Salford. The first 20 videos will be showcased as part of the festival and during the festival we will encourage more to participate and create videos themselves.

 

 

Targeted Impact Events

As part of the Festival we will be running a number of specifically impact-related events to help inspire our researchers to think more closely about the impact of their research and how they can best improve its significance and reach in the future.

 

Highlights include:

Wednesday, 27 June 2018: Fast Track Impact case study writing workshop with Prof Mark Reed

Mark will focus specifically on the REF and what makes a good impact case study, how to improve your writing around impact, as well as evidence collection tips. This workshop will also include detailed external peer review of 4 draft impact case studies, with recommendations of how these can be enhanced and improved.

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597642/staff-development-fast-track-t

 

Thursday, 28 June 2018: Developing Your Narrative Sessions with Chris Simms, Royal Literary Fund

Chris is holding individual 40-minute mentoring sessions for researchers looking to develop their narrative and storywriting skills, whether it be for the purpose of formulating impact case studies, writing funding bids, making applications for research festivals or similar.

All enquiries: research-impact@salford.ac.uk

 

Tuesday, 3 July 2018: Impact Case Study Writing Retreat (MCUK)

Space will be made available to each School to spend dedicated time working on existing or potential impact case study drafts. Impact Coordinators will be on hand to provide advice and guidance and researchers will be able to access resources from the REF intranet site and use the Figshare data repository to gather impact evidence.

To book:

AM: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/604998/festival-of-research-impact-ca

PM: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/605001/festival-of-research-impact-ca

 

Wednesday, 11 July 2018: Developing Your Narrative Sessions with Chris Simms, Royal Literary Fund

Chris is holding individual 40-minute mentoring sessions for researchers looking to develop their narrative and storywriting skills, whether it be for the purpose of formulating impact case studies, writing funding bids, making applications for research festivals or similar.

All enquiries: research-impact@salford.ac.uk

 

Why not take this opportunity to check out the Festival of Research website to find events of interest to you: https://www.salford.ac.uk/researchfest

Join the conversation:

#salfordresearchfest         @Festivalofrese1

 

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Jun 13 2018

Two members of staff from the Directorate of Journalism, Politics and Contemporary History, School of Arts and Media, have been shortlisted for the prestigious Whitfield Prize for 2018, awarded annually by the Royal Historical Society for the best first monograph on either British or Irish history. Dr Dan Lomas, Lecturer in International History, and Dr Brian Hall, Lecturer in Contemporary Military History, have both been selected by the jury for the shortlist. Dr Lomas’ book, entitled Intelligence, Security and the Attlee Governments, 1945–1951: An Uneasy Relationship? was published by Manchester University Press, while Dr Hall’s book, Communications and British Operations on the Western Front, 1914-1918, was published by Cambridge University Press.

Alaric Searle, Professor of Modern European History, and Research Lead for Politics and Contemporary History, said, “I am delighted for both Brian and Dan, not just because they are excellent colleagues but also because they are developing into equally excellent historians in their own right. ”

 

        

 

To be eligible for the Whitfield Prize, a book must be the author’s first published work, on a subject of British or Irish history, and the author must have received his/her PhD from a British or Irish university. The other authors shortlisted received their doctorates from the universities of Oxford, Royal Holloway, King’s College London, Queen’s Belfast and Birmingham. As Alaric noted: “What makes this recognition all the more noteworthy is that both Dan and Brian received their PhDs from the University of Salford; and, Salford has never had either a member of staff, or a former Salford PhD student, shortlisted for this award. Thus, to have two nominations in the same year is a great achievement. It provides just one more indicator of the quality of research being conducted in Politics and Contemporary History at the moment.”

He added: “I am not that surprised about the nomination as I know the quality of work both Dan and Brian have been publishing. In fact, Brian’s book was shortlisted earlier this year for the Templar Medal for the Best First Book, awarded by the Society for Army Historical Research.”

The winner of the Whitfield Prize is to be announced next month by the Royal Historical Society, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year.

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May 11 2018

According to Fast Track Impact’s calculations (see: http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2017/02/01/How-much-was-an-impact-case-study-worth-in-the-UK-Research-Excellence-Framework for further details), the best impact submissions to REF2014, i.e. those achieving a 4* star narrative case study, had a currency exchange of some £324,000 (£46,300 per year between 2015/16-2021/22). By contrast, a 4* research output was typically valued at between £5,000-£25,000. Generally speaking, impact case studies are thought to be worth around 5 times more than outputs at higher full-time equivalents (FTEs).

As such, the huge potential value this may bring to institutions cannot be underestimated, particularly given the increased weighting of impact from 20% to 25% for the next REF exercise in 2021. Consequently, institutions employ a number of strategies and resources to ensure the best possible outcomes of their REF impact submissions. For example, there are reports of significant sums being spent by some universities in the REF2014 exercise on copy editors or science writers in order to create compelling narratives that would stand up to the scrutiny of the REF panel members.

A robust internal and external peer review process is one means of tracking progress over time in order to enhance and improve narratives and impact evidence ahead of the final REF submission in 2020.

 

Upcoming peer review events

The University of Salford is undertaking its first external peer review of draft impact case studies this Summer as part of its REF Readiness exercise. This will give the University a snapshot of where things stand and where improvements still need to made in the 2 years leading up to the REF submission. The feedback from the external peer review will inform the planned internal peer review due to take place in early 2019.

 

Dates for the diary include:

Monday, 18 June 2018 – Friday, 29 June 2018: External peer review of 10 x impact case studies across UoAs      This will include review and annotation of draft case studies, an overview report, notes on potential grades and advice on how to enhance impact.

Monday, 25 June 2018 – Friday, 20 July 2018: University of Salford Festival of Research       A month-long programme of events celebrating and promoting the University’s valuable research. This will include a REF-focused impact case study writing workshop, an impact ‘writing retreat’ and one-to-one mentoring on impact narratives.

Wednesday, 27 June 2018: Fast Track Impact case study writing workshop with Prof Mark Reed           Mark will focus specifically on the REF and what makes a good impact case study, how to improve your writing around impact, as well as evidence collection tips. This workshop will also include detailed external peer review of 4 draft impact case studies, with recommendations of how these can be enhanced and improved.

 

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597642/staff-development-fast-track-t

 

Why not take this opportunity to look at the upcoming peer review meetings and events information on our REF Intranet site at: https://teamsite.salford.ac.uk/sites/sc02/REF2021/SitePages/Training.aspx

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Apr 10 2018

As the REF draws ever closer, thoughts are now turning to impact and how to ensure that the University’s research is demonstrating impact beyond academia and making a real difference in the wider world. This raises a number of questions about what constitutes impact and impact evidence, where this should be stored, when it should be collected and how it can be enhanced.

In order to help researchers to gain a better understanding of research impact and what it means to them, a training programme designed specifically around impact is being rolled out across the University in the coming months.

 

Upcoming internal training and events

Future training will be tailored to meet individual needs in terms of impact. For example, you might be looking for a taster session to learn what research impact is all about, or maybe you are an early career researcher bidding for funding for the first time. Perhaps you are a mid-career or senior researcher who needs some advice on collection of impact evidence. Whatever your requirements, there is something to suit every level and discipline.

 

Events of note include:

 

Monday, 16 April 2018: Impact writing workshop with Chris Simms

Chris from the Royal Literary Fund will be visiting the University again to hold a sessions around writing for impact, creating a narrative and telling a story.

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597635/staff-development-new-to-impac

 

Thursday, 3 May 2018: Fast Track Impact workshop with Prof Mark Reed

Mark returns for the first of two workshops, this one focusing on generating and evaluating impact, as well as how to maximise your social media presence for enhanced impact.

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597641/staff-development-fast-track-t

 

Monday, 25 June 2018 – Friday, 20 July 2018: University of Salford Festival of Research

A month-long programme of events celebrating and promoting the University’s valuable research. This will include the popular PGR event ‘SPARC’ (Salford Postgraduate Annual Research Conference) on 4 + 5 July 2018, as well as an impact ‘writing retreat’ on 3 July 2018 for budding impact case study writers

 

Wednesday, 27 June 2018: Fast Track Impact case study writing workshop with Prof Mark Reed

Mark will focus specifically on the REF and what makes a good impact case study, how to improve your writing around impact, as well as evidence collection tips.

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597642/staff-development-fast-track-t

 

From September 2018 a suite of workshops specifically around impact will be embedded into the staff development programme (SECRET) – further information will be available shortly.

Why not take this opportunity to look at the upcoming training, meetings and events information on our REF Intranet site at: https://teamsite.salford.ac.uk/sites/sc02/REF2021/SitePages/Training.aspx

 

External training

Alternatively, why not sign up for the free 5-week impact online training course run by Fast Track Impact?

Each session comprises 6-minute video and a short reading. After each session, you will be given tasks to complete within your own research before the next session:

  • Introduction: Five ways to fast track your impact
  • Week 1: Envision your impact
  • Week 2: Plan for impact
  • Week 3: Cut back anything hindering or distracting you from your impact 
  • Week 4: Get specific about the impacts you will seek and the people who can help you achieve impact this month
  • Week 5: Achieve your first step towards impact and monitor your success

 

Further details can be found here: http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/for-researchers

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Apr 09 2018
Professor Garry CrawfordA leading scholar in sociology and criminology specialising in audiences, consumers, technology, fans, sport and games has been conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.Garry Crawford, Professor within the School of Health & Society is one of 58 leading social scientists awarded the Fellowship this year. He is only the fifth at Salford, including our former Vice-Chancellor Professor Michael Harlow, to have received this honour.

The new Fellows are drawn from academics, practitioners and policymakers across the social sciences. They have been recognised after an extensive peer review process for the excellence and impact of their work through the use of social science for public benefit. Garry was nominated for the Fellowship by the Leisure Studies Association for his contribution to the field of digital leisure.

It’s been a pretty momentous week for Garry, who has also just released a book around the culture of Video Games.

Announcing the conferment, Professor Roger Goodman FAcSS, Chair of the Academy said:

“Each new Fellow has made an outstanding contribution in their respective field and together they demonstrate the vital role played by social science in addressing some of our most pressing public issues.

We are delighted to welcome them to the Academy.”

Speaking about the announcement, Garry said: “It really is an honour to be conferred a Fellowship of the Academy alongside so many great scholars.”

Garry is a Professor of Cultural Sociology, a Director of the University of Salford Digital Cluster and has authored eight books. He has worked at the University for ten years and is a proud alumnus, having graduated from Salford in 1995 with a degree in Sociology.

In addition to his University position, Garry is review editor for the journal Cultural Sociology.

A full listing of all new Fellows can be found on the Academy of Social Sciences website.

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Mar 21 2018

One way of effectively demonstrating the impact that your research has had on your stakeholders is to collect testimonial evidence. This generally takes the form of a letter from a collaborator on headed paper, although e-mails are also acceptable.

It can sometimes feel awkward to ask collaborators to write corroborating statements of this kind and this is why researchers often leave it to the last minute to request this information. Don’t make this mistake: if you leave it too late you may find that the main contact for your research has left the institution, may have retired or even passed away. You should therefore capture all evidence from your stakeholders as soon as you can.

Most importantly, don’t forget to look into whether or not you need informed consent and ethical approval before obtaining any testimonials.

 

 

Requesting letters of support

When it comes to requesting supporting letters, the level of detail is in part dictated by what the organisation is willing to provide. However, the following suggestions may help you in deciding what would make a strong testimonial in support of your research impact:

  1. Clearly outline who the letter is from, their role in the organisation and connection to the project in question
  2. State the researcher(s) and University(ies) involved and why they were chosen to be part of the project (e.g. research profile/quality; previous collaborations; expertise in the field etc.)
  3. Describe the project/activities undertaken and importance of the research to the stakeholder organisation (how it has enhanced their business/portfolio)
  4. Describe the benefits to the organisation and/or members, through qualitative and/or quantitative means          (NB: for impact evidence some form of quantitative data will help make a stronger case if available, e.g. audience reach etc.)
  5. Indicate if the organisation is proposing any ongoing partnerships/future collaborations

 

Other guidance

External organisations, such as Fast Track Impact (in the UK) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, provide useful information on how to collect testimonials and what could be included.

Why not check out the following:

Fast Track Impact:

http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2018/02/23/Getting-testimonials-to-corroborate-the-impact-of-your-research

Canadian Institutes of Health Research:

http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/45246.html

 

 

Remember: start collecting your impact testimonials as your research develops and don’t forget to store them in our Figshare data repository at  https://salford.figshare.com/

 

 

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Mar 21 2018

CARe Newsletter Front Page

The CARe newsletter recently received a new look following feedback from colleagues across the School.

It is hoped that the redesigned format will help readers to understand more about the wide range of work that the Centre does and, as a result, prove useful in engaging with external partners.

CARe has an internationally recognised profile and is instrumental in the delivery of progressive social and cultural change at local, regional, national and international levels. As such, the content of the newsletter attempts to strike a balance between showcasing our expertise and celebrating our achievements.

Current features include:

  • CARe Events
  • CARe Project Updates
  • Professional Awards and New Roles
  • Recently Published Work

The CARe newsletter is published quarterly, and electronic versions are available to view and download at:  www.salford.ac.uk/research/care/resources/e-news

 

Please feel free to circulate a copy widely amongst your contacts!

 

We are happy for the newsletter to evolve so if you have any feedback at all, then please contact us via email: CARe@salford.ac.uk

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Mar 20 2018

ALTGQT Logo

There is a growing recognition that Green Care can positively influence health and well-being at an individual and community level. However, this knowledge has had limited reach to those who it may impact most in the community. The promotion of health and well-being through alternative approaches such as Green Care presents realistic, alternative methods. Our ‘Alternative Gardeners Question Time’, part of the 2017 ESRC Festival of Social Science, was designed to facilitate debate with local communities, charities, public health and environmental organisations about what constitutes significant health and well-being outcomes for the community and individual. This debate helped identify pertinent well-being outcomes that Green Care could provide for residents within Salford & Manchester.

Nature Based Activity in Salford

A diverse range of nature based activities and green care are located within Salford and surrounding geographical areas. The extent of this activity is currently unknown, the University of Salford is working with local organisations, and the RHS to map existing provision to enable a comprehensive picture of nature based work. Mapping existing provision will help to determine a more coordinated approach and enable CCGs, local authorities and public health to understand the extent of support and asset-based community nature-based approaches. This will help to develop a community referral process and support decision-making processes for those health and social care professionals who work in the NHS and community sector.

 

Event Structure

The Alternative Gardeners Question Time was structured in three parts:  sharing the science base about Green Care, discussing Green Care and key questions and, finally, developing questions for an expert panel for wider discussion.

ALTGQT Workshop

 

Further Information

The full report can be found here:  ALTGQT Report

 

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Mar 20 2018

Photo - Dr Jacqueline Leigh

 

Dr Jacqueline Leigh moved into academia from being a Senior Nurse Manager in the NHS. Since qualifying as a registered nurse in 1986 Jacqueline has maintained her professional registration and gained a BSc (Hons) in Nursing and Masters in Health Professional Education. She also completed her PhD in 2012 and in 2017 was awarded Principal Fellow Higher Education Academy.

Her continual professional development has resulted in changes that have been made within the areas of healthcare leadership and management, pedagogical research and health professional practice. This has culminated into being appointed the first Reader Teaching and Learning, Health Professional Education at the University of Salford.

 

Impact of work

Over the years she has developed strong strategic partnerships that inspire a commitment to learning by both academics and students within the field of health professional education. Impact is the bringing together of the right stakeholders from NHS and private, voluntary and independent health and social care organisations across Greater Manchester to develop and implement strategies to address quality assurance in relation to: the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) professional requirements for undergraduate pre-registration nursing practice placements; and Health Education England North West and Department of Health directives.

An advocate for evidence based education, teaching and assessment Jacqueline innovates curriculum and assessment and supports workforce development through teaching and learning excellence. She is committed to supporting others in engaging in academic scholarship and professional development through which she is able to ensure that every academic has the potential to disseminate good practice.

 

Plans for the future

Jacqueline is a strategic champion at the University of Salford and Non-Executive Director at Healthwatch Salford which enables her to influence the healthcare services being developed to improve patient experience in Salford.

In the future she will continue to work with others to help them face the challenges of an evolving higher education system and the changes which are taking place within the field of health professional education.

 

What it Means to be a National Teaching Fellow

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