Archive for March 21, 2018

Collecting Testimonial Evidence of Impact

One way of effectively demonstrating the impact that your research has had on your stakeholders is to collect testimonial evidence. This generally takes the form of a letter from a collaborator on headed paper, although e-mails are also acceptable.

It can sometimes feel awkward to ask collaborators to write corroborating statements of this kind and this is why researchers often leave it to the last minute to request this information. Don’t make this mistake: if you leave it too late you may find that the main contact for your research has left the institution, may have retired or even passed away. You should therefore capture all evidence from your stakeholders as soon as you can.

Most importantly, don’t forget to look into whether or not you need informed consent and ethical approval before obtaining any testimonials.

 

 

Requesting letters of support

When it comes to requesting supporting letters, the level of detail is in part dictated by what the organisation is willing to provide. However, the following suggestions may help you in deciding what would make a strong testimonial in support of your research impact:

  1. Clearly outline who the letter is from, their role in the organisation and connection to the project in question
  2. State the researcher(s) and University(ies) involved and why they were chosen to be part of the project (e.g. research profile/quality; previous collaborations; expertise in the field etc.)
  3. Describe the project/activities undertaken and importance of the research to the stakeholder organisation (how it has enhanced their business/portfolio)
  4. Describe the benefits to the organisation and/or members, through qualitative and/or quantitative means          (NB: for impact evidence some form of quantitative data will help make a stronger case if available, e.g. audience reach etc.)
  5. Indicate if the organisation is proposing any ongoing partnerships/future collaborations

 

Other guidance

External organisations, such as Fast Track Impact (in the UK) and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, provide useful information on how to collect testimonials and what could be included.

Why not check out the following:

Fast Track Impact:

http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2018/02/23/Getting-testimonials-to-corroborate-the-impact-of-your-research

Canadian Institutes of Health Research:

http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/45246.html

 

 

Remember: start collecting your impact testimonials as your research develops and don’t forget to store them in our Figshare data repository at  https://salford.figshare.com/

 

 


A New Look for the CARe Newsletter

CARe Newsletter Front Page

The CARe newsletter recently received a new look following feedback from colleagues across the School.

It is hoped that the redesigned format will help readers to understand more about the wide range of work that the Centre does and, as a result, prove useful in engaging with external partners.

CARe has an internationally recognised profile and is instrumental in the delivery of progressive social and cultural change at local, regional, national and international levels. As such, the content of the newsletter attempts to strike a balance between showcasing our expertise and celebrating our achievements.

Current features include:

  • CARe Events
  • CARe Project Updates
  • Professional Awards and New Roles
  • Recently Published Work

The CARe newsletter is published quarterly, and electronic versions are available to view and download at:  www.salford.ac.uk/research/care/resources/e-news

 

Please feel free to circulate a copy widely amongst your contacts!

 

We are happy for the newsletter to evolve so if you have any feedback at all, then please contact us via email: CARe@salford.ac.uk


Alternative Gardeners Question Time

ALTGQT Logo

There is a growing recognition that Green Care can positively influence health and well-being at an individual and community level. However, this knowledge has had limited reach to those who it may impact most in the community. The promotion of health and well-being through alternative approaches such as Green Care presents realistic, alternative methods. Our ‘Alternative Gardeners Question Time’, part of the 2017 ESRC Festival of Social Science, was designed to facilitate debate with local communities, charities, public health and environmental organisations about what constitutes significant health and well-being outcomes for the community and individual. This debate helped identify pertinent well-being outcomes that Green Care could provide for residents within Salford & Manchester.

Nature Based Activity in Salford

A diverse range of nature based activities and green care are located within Salford and surrounding geographical areas. The extent of this activity is currently unknown, the University of Salford is working with local organisations, and the RHS to map existing provision to enable a comprehensive picture of nature based work. Mapping existing provision will help to determine a more coordinated approach and enable CCGs, local authorities and public health to understand the extent of support and asset-based community nature-based approaches. This will help to develop a community referral process and support decision-making processes for those health and social care professionals who work in the NHS and community sector.

 

Event Structure

The Alternative Gardeners Question Time was structured in three parts:  sharing the science base about Green Care, discussing Green Care and key questions and, finally, developing questions for an expert panel for wider discussion.

ALTGQT Workshop

 

Further Information

The full report can be found here:  ALTGQT Report

 


Becoming a Higher Education Academy National Teaching Fellow

Photo - Dr Jacqueline Leigh

 

Dr Jacqueline Leigh moved into academia from being a Senior Nurse Manager in the NHS. Since qualifying as a registered nurse in 1986 Jacqueline has maintained her professional registration and gained a BSc (Hons) in Nursing and Masters in Health Professional Education. She also completed her PhD in 2012 and in 2017 was awarded Principal Fellow Higher Education Academy.

Her continual professional development has resulted in changes that have been made within the areas of healthcare leadership and management, pedagogical research and health professional practice. This has culminated into being appointed the first Reader Teaching and Learning, Health Professional Education at the University of Salford.

 

Impact of work

Over the years she has developed strong strategic partnerships that inspire a commitment to learning by both academics and students within the field of health professional education. Impact is the bringing together of the right stakeholders from NHS and private, voluntary and independent health and social care organisations across Greater Manchester to develop and implement strategies to address quality assurance in relation to: the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) professional requirements for undergraduate pre-registration nursing practice placements; and Health Education England North West and Department of Health directives.

An advocate for evidence based education, teaching and assessment Jacqueline innovates curriculum and assessment and supports workforce development through teaching and learning excellence. She is committed to supporting others in engaging in academic scholarship and professional development through which she is able to ensure that every academic has the potential to disseminate good practice.

 

Plans for the future

Jacqueline is a strategic champion at the University of Salford and Non-Executive Director at Healthwatch Salford which enables her to influence the healthcare services being developed to improve patient experience in Salford.

In the future she will continue to work with others to help them face the challenges of an evolving higher education system and the changes which are taking place within the field of health professional education.

 

What it Means to be a National Teaching Fellow


European Congress of Radiology (ECR) 2018

ECR was held in Vienna, Austria from 28th February until 4th March inclusive; each day it runs from 8.00am until 7pm. It attracted around 25,000 participants, making it the second largest radiology conference in the world. It is of interest to physicists, radiographers, radiologists and a wide range of other health care professionals, including industry. As always the Directorate of Radiography at the University of Salford had a large presence, with contributions from BSc, MSc and PhD students as well as staff. The Directorate of Radiography first or co-authored 28 scientific posters and oral papers with friends and colleagues from U.K., Norway, Ireland, Switzerland, Australia, Portugal, South Africa, Brazil, Netherlands, Libya, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Greece. They also launched their OPTIMAX 2017 book (http://usir.salford.ac.uk/46104/7/OPTIMAX%202017%20ed.pdf, Figure 1). All lectures can be seen online free of charge (http://ecronline.myesr.org/ecr2018/).

This year two 2nd year BSc Diagnostic Radiography students (Lucinda Gray and Shaun Dorey, Figure 2) presented extracurricular research into smart glasses as a poster and also as an oral presentation. The work was developed with Consultant Radiologist Dr Shofiq Al-Islam (Royal Blackburn Hospital), Helen Baxter (Tameside Hospital) and staff from the Directorate of Radiography at Salford. Figures 3 and 4 show Andrew England and Leslie Robinson, from the Directorate of Radiography, presenting their papers at ECR.

Figure 1: OPTIMAX book launch

(Editors left to right: Annemieke Heij-Meijer; Carst Buissink (Netherlands) and Peter Hogg (Radiography/Salford)

 

Figure 2: Lucinda and Shaun presenting their work at ECR

Figure 3 Andrew England, Radiography/Salford, presenting a paper at ECR

Figure 4 Leslie Robinson, Radiography/Salford, presenting a paper at ECR