Posts in HS Category

2019 preparations and ‘REF readiness’

With Christmas fast approaching, here in the REF team we are already turning our attention to 2019 and considering how our REF readiness activities will start to take shape. In terms of our preparations around impact, the new year will herald a raft of targeted activities to help ensure that our case study submission in 2020 is the strongest it can possibly be.

Key deadlines

A few key dates in 2019 for our impact case study leads to bear in mind are as follows:

  • 28 February 2019 – Submission of revised impact case study drafts (using new REF2021 template)
  • February/March 2019 – Impact Action Plan mid-point review meetings
  • March 2019 – Recording of short impact videos (via Marketing & External Relations)
  • 8 April 2019 – Chris Simms informal peer review workshop
  • April 2019 – Planned formal internal peer review of impact case studies
  • June 2019 – Planned formal external peer review of impact case studies

The above dates are complemented by the University’s ‘SECRET’ researcher development programme, which is designed to ensure that our researchers are ‘REF ready’. Further details can be found through our Salford Advantage pages at: https://www.salford.ac.uk/staff-development

The programme includes our monthly one-to-one storytelling mentoring sessions with Chris Simms (bookings through research-impact@salford.ac.uk), impact writing retreats, bidding and funding information sessions, REF briefings and much more.

Alternatively, training of interest is also listed on our Training Calendar, which can be found at: www.salford.ac.uk/ref

 


Impact Guidance for REF2021

The initial set of guidance materials for REF2021 (including guidance on submissions and panel guidelines) was published in July 2018 and consultation with the sector was concluded on 15th October 2018.

The final guidance is due to be published in January 2019, after which time the University will hold a series of briefing meetings through our appointed Unit of Assessment Leads to update colleagues on the key details.

In the meantime, the salient points to take from the latest REF consultation documents on impact case study submission is as follows:

 

Definition of impact for the REF

For the purposes of the REF, impact is defined as an effect on, change or benefit to the economy, society, culture, public policy or services, health, the environment or quality of life, beyond academia.

Impact includes, but is not limited to, an effect on, change or benefit to:

  • the activity, attitude, awareness, behaviour, capacity, opportunity, performance, policy, practice, process or understanding
  • of an audience, beneficiary, community, constituency, organisation or individuals
  • in any geographic location whether locally, regionally, nationally or internationally

Impact also includes the reduction or prevention of harm, risk, cost or other negative effects.

Impacts will be assessed in terms of their ‘reach and significance’ regardless of the geographic location in which they occurred, whether locally, regionally, nationally or internationally.

**Further guidance about how panels will assess the case studies against the criteria of reach and significance is found separately at www.salford.ac.uk/ref under Impact Evidence Collection.**

 

Submission requirements

  • Each submission must include impact case studies (REF3 template) describing specific impacts that have occurred during the assessment period (1 August 2013 to 31 July 2020) that were underpinned by excellent research undertaken in the submitted unit. The impacts may have been at any stage of development or maturity during this period, so long as some effect, change or benefit meeting the definition of impact took place during that period.

 

  • This may include, for example, impacts at an early stage, or impacts that may have started prior to 1 August 2013 but continued into the period 1 August 2013 to 31 July 2020. Case studies will be assessed in terms of the reach and significance of the impact that occurred only during the period 1 August 2013 to 31 July 2020, and not in terms of any impact prior to this period or potential future or anticipated impact after this period.

 

  • The underpinning research must have been produced by the submitting HEI during the period 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2020. Underpinning research may be a body of work produced over a number of years or may be the output(s) of a particular project. It may be produced by one or more individuals.

 

  • When writing case studies, submitting units should refer to the guidelines for presenting quantitative data set out in the ‘Guidelines for standardising quantitative indicators of impact within REF case studies’. These guidelines have been developed to enable more consistent presentation of quantitative evidence in case studies. This document (and a summary thereof) can be found separately at www.salford.ac.uk/ref under Impact Evidence Collection.

 

  • More than one submitted unit (within the same HEI or in different HEIs) may include the same impact within their respective case studies, so long as each submitted unit produced excellent research that made a distinct and material contribution to the impact.

 

  • Impact case studies continued from examples submitted in 2014 will be eligible for submission in REF 2021 as long as they meet the 2021 eligibility criteria.

 

 

Go to www.salford.ac.uk/ref to check out all the latest REF guidance.

 

 

 


ESRC Festival of Social Science – November 2018

The University of Salford, alongside partner institutions Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester, are running over 30 events across Manchester and Salford as part of this year’s ESRC Festival of Social Science, 3-10 November 2018.

The Festival showcases Manchester social science research to a broad non-academic audience. This brings together an eclectic blend of activities designed to celebrate the social sciences, including discussions and debates, exhibitions, film screenings, walkabouts, family fun days, schools visits, workshops, and lots more.

Aims of the Festival

Through its Festival of Social Science, the ESRC aims to:

  • Encourage, support and create the opportunity for social science researchers to engage with non-academic audiences
  • Promote and increase awareness of the social sciences and ESRC’s research
  • Promote and increase awareness of the contributions the social sciences make to the wellbeing and the economy of the UK society
  • Enable the public to engage with social science research
  • Engage with teachers and young people and to raise their awareness of the social sciences.

 

Contributions from our researchers in the School of Health & Society:

/ Catherine Thompson & Bruno Fazenda

Using VR nature environments to improve performance and wellbeing

Saturday 3rd November 10am – 5pm / Manchester Museum

 

/ Philip Brown, Lisa Scullion & Tim Isherwood

The power of design: exploring the role of creative research dissemination

Monday 5th November 5pm – 8pm / New Adelphi Building, University of Salford campus

 

/ Jack Wilson, Anthea Innes, Andrew Clark & Anya Ahmed

University of Salford dementia and ageing hub showcase

Tuesday 6th November 2.30pm – 4.30pm / G05 The Old Fire Station, University of Salford campus

 

/ Cathy Ure, Penny Cook, Liz Burns, Margaret Coffey & Suzy Hargreaves

Putting communities in charge of alcohol: a health champion model

Tuesday 6th November Time 5.30pm – 7.00pm / The Friends Meeting House, Manchester

 

/ Donna Peach, Gabi Hesk, Deanna Edwards & Andrea Pepe

Developing community engagement with the social sciences

Wednesday 7th November 12pm-8pm / Atrium, Adelphi Building, University of Salford campus

 

/ Tina Patel & Laura Connelly

Divided communities? What the Brexit future means for people in Salford

Thursday 8th November 1pm – 3pm / G05, The Old Fire Station, University of Salford campus

 

/ Michaela Rogers

Ageing with healthy relationships: overcoming barriers to help-seeking when experiencing domestic abuse

Friday 9th November 2018 – INVITE ONLY / The Pankhurst Centre, Manchester

 

/ Ian Cummins & Toni Wood

True crime and punishment: exploring the influence of cultural representations of crime

Saturday 10th November 10am – 3.30pm / MediaCity UK

 

/ Dilla Davis & Annie Nichols with Manchester Malayalee Cultural Association (MMCA)

After a heart attack – role of cardiac rehabilitation

Saturday 10th November, 2pm – 4pm / Woodhouse Park Lifestyle Center

 

 

Why not come along and join in the activities?

Full details of all events across the week are available at:  www.esrcmanchesterfest.ac.uk.

Tweet your comments using the hashtags #esrcfestival and #McrESRCfest


Impact Case Study Action Plans

As part of the REF readiness exercise in preparation for our REF submission in 2020, the Impact, Engagement and Environment Coordinator, in conjunction with the School Impact Coordinators, is holding a series of ‘Impact Case Study Action Plan’ meetings with identified case study leads.

Initial meetings have already started to take place and will continue throughout September and October. These will be followed up by mid-point review and year-end review meetings.

The aim of these meetings is to set a number of SMART objectives to guide our case study leads through the development of their case studies across the next two years in preparation for the final REF submission.

 

 

Key areas of focus include:

  • Creation of an ‘impact’ folder within Figshare in order to deposit all impact evidence collected to date and to maintain on an ongoing basis
  • Identification of research outputs to be included as ‘underpinning research’ for the impacts claimed in the case study
  • Completion of a stakeholder analysis to identify who has benefitted so far from the research, who to contact for testimonials, who to target to generate future impact and so on
  • Redrafting of impact case study information to date to reflect development of objectives and to shape the final submission

 

Further details on what constitutes an impact and how to measure ‘reach and significance’ of the impact have been released by REF in their draft panel guidance.

These details can be found here: https://www.ref.ac.uk/publications/

This list is not exhaustive, but provides a useful overview of the many different ways that research can generate an impact of some kind. Some food for thought!

 

Peer review of impact case studies

It is anticipated that both formal and informal internal peer reviews of impact case studies will be held in late 2018/early 2019, with another external peer review planned for Summer 2019.

Development of impact case studies through adherence to the ‘Impact Case Study Action Plan’ should help our case study leads to submit further drafts of their impact case studies for peer review to enable meaningful feedback to be provided and fed into future iterations of the action plan.

 

Why not take this opportunity to check out this and other impact resources available on the REF staff intranet: https://www.salford.ac.uk/ref


Impact Case Study Examples

The University of Salford’s REF intranet site (www.salford.ac.uk/ref) has recently been updated to include some of the annotated case study drafts from the recent external peer review exercise.

The insightful comments from the peer reviewers will be used to help shape further case study drafts and also to help inform the forthcoming internal peer review process.

Examples can be found under the Impact section: External Peer Review

 

Some general points noted by the external peer reviewers include:

  • A number of case studies don’t distinguish between research and resulting impact, instead flagging impacts that appear to be benefits to the academy rather than societal impacts, so some further advice on that distinction might be useful
  • Some cases focus on dissemination at the expense of resulting impacts, again further advice and clarification might help
  • Some do not convincingly demonstrate robustness of underpinning research or links between the research and claimed impacts, some of this may be limitations in the research, some could be developed further
  • Most could improve the clarity with which impacts are articulated, and their apparent significance and reach (true of most cases, from a variety of institutions, at this stage)
  • Most need to supplement the current corroboration with more in depth, specific or appropriate evidence
  • It is very likely that submission of names and positions of staff, and dates of employment at the institution will be mandatory, so do that now, especially to show clarity around eligibility
  • All evidence will need to be submitted with the case studies so ensure it is in an accessible and appropriate format.  Where web pages are used, ensure you have preserved them and don’t just use standard links.

 

Further information on what makes a top impact case study can be found at the following external site, for example:

What makes a 4* Impact Case Study:

Fast Track Impact What Makes a 4 Star Impact Case Study.pdf

What made a 4* Impact Case Study in REF2014:

https://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2018/06/04/What-made-a-4-impact-case-study-in-REF2014

 

A section on how to identify 4* impact case studies on the REF2014 website and to look at lessons learned from REF2014 can also be found at:

https://teamsite.salford.ac.uk/sites/sc02/REF2021/SitePages/REF2014%20and%20Impact.aspx

 

Why not take this opportunity to check out this and other impact resources available on the REF staff intranet: https://www.salford.ac.uk/ref


PhD Studentship in the area of Digital Health or Integrated Care in the School of Health and Society/School of Health Sciences, University of Salford. Start Date – End of September 2018.

 

About the Schools

The Schools of Health and Society and Health Sciences are forward-thinking, dynamic schools with a commitment to lifelong learning and real world impact by focusing on the health and wellbeing of people and helping them at all stages of their lives.  In September 2018 the Schools will be merging to create one School.  These studentships offer a chance to bring together interests across the Schools.

We are focused on developing our knowledge and understanding, so we can actively help people, our clients, to lead more productive, comfortable lives. We have a fantastic range of facilities which reflect those in practice and focus on new technologies and pioneering techniques.

https://www.salford.ac.uk/health-and-society

https://www.salford.ac.uk/health-sciences

 

About our research

Our research underpins our teaching and learning, ensuring our staff, students and partner organisations reach their full potential and remain at the forefront of innovation.

Research is organised into two Centres:

 

  • Centre for Applied Research in Health, Welfare and Policy (CaRe)

https://www.salford.ac.uk/research/care

 

  • Centre for Health Sciences Research

https://www.salford.ac.uk/research/health-sciences

 

More details regarding our research and our research staff (and their interests) can be found on the above websites.

 

About the studentships

Applications for PhD studentships are sought in the areas of Digital Health or Integrated Care.  It is expected that applicants will possess a minimum 2.1 degree in a relevant subject area. A higher degree qualification would be desirable.

Experienced supervisors will be provided from across the Schools.  Proposals that fall within these themes will be considered and prospective students are expected to provide a focus to the proposal and may consult with prospective supervisors prior to application.

The studentship will include 3 years full time fees and a tax free scholarship of £14,553 per annum (for 3 years).  Successful students will be expected to contribute to the success of the School in terms of timely progression and contribution to the production of research outputs or teaching during their candidature.

The University of Salford provides an extensive training programme for PhD candidates as part of the Doctoral School and at School Level within the Schools of Health and Society and Health Sciences.  Training includes compulsory induction and ethics and an introductory “Getting Started Week”.

 

About the application procedure

Application is online.  Applicants must provide evidence of their existing knowledge and experience in the chosen topic area in a formal Research Proposal and supplementary CV.

The proposal should contain:  1. A summary of relevant literature related to the proposed project 2. Aims of the proposed research 3. An outline the key research methods proposed to appropriately address the aims. This document should be 3-4 sides of typed A4.

Further details about the procedure are available at: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying/applying-for-research

Applications will pass through an initial filter stage and then an interview prior to a final offer.

 

Timelines

Deadline for receipt of online application:  31st July 2018

Interviews:  Interviews will be held w/c 20th August

Offers:  Informal offer will be communicated by 27th August

Registration and start:  Registration w/c 24th September

Induction and Getting Started Week:  w/c 3rd October (TBC)

 

Integrated Care

Further details regarding the Integrated Care agenda across Greater Manchester can be found at: http://www.gmhsc.org.uk/

 

For further information please contact:

Louise Brown, PGR Support:  PGR-SupportSHAS@salford.ac.uk or PGR-SupportHS@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 6345

Professor Alison Brettle, PGR Director, School of Health and Society:  a.brettle@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 0447

Dr Yeliz Prior, PGR Director, School of Health Sciences: y.prior@salford.ac.uk

Tel: 0161 295 0211


Research Impact Resources

The University of Salford’s REF intranet site (www.salford.ac.uk/ref) provides a wealth of resources for researchers to tap into, wherever they may be on their impact journey. This ranges from those that are new to impact and those that are impact-aware through to experienced impact practitioners.

A few of the links to external resources available on the REF intranet site are as follows:

  1. Fast Track Impact (Prof Mark Reed)

Fast Track Impact resources can be accessed online at the following link:

http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/resources

 

This wealth of information includes:

  • Fast Track Research Impact Guides

 

A series of “how to” guides for researchers.

  • Fast Track Research Impact Podcasts

 

A series of twelve ½-hour podcasts around the subject of impact can be listened to here:

http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/podcast

  • Fast Track Impact: What makes a 4* impact case study?

 

Fast Track Impact What Makes a 4 Star Impact Case Study.pdf

https://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2018/06/04/What-made-a-4-impact-case-study-in-REF2014

 

  1. The Leadership Foundation Impact Toolkit

The Leadership Foundation have developed a Research Leaders Impact Toolkit designed to “offer a suite of research-based tools that can be used by higher education institutions to:

  • Develop a formal research impact strategy
  • Devise strategies for leading, managing and practising impact
  • Align impact work with engagement, knowledge exchange, outreach and quality improvement
  • Inform teaching and learning
  • Improve processes and infrastructure
  • Build capacity, skills and knowledge”

To access the toolkit, you will need to login to or create your “MyLF” account.

  1. Research Councils

Most Research Councils have specific guidance and advice about how to complete Pathways to Impact applications.

Further information on Research Councils can be found here: https://www.ukri.org/funding/funding-opportunities/

Funders ask for explicit answers to the following questions:

  • Who will benefit from this research?
  • How will they benefit from this research?
  • What will be done to ensure that they have the opportunity to benefit from this research?

Funders emphasise the importance of allocating sufficient costs/resources to activities described in impact plans.

 

  1. Taylor and Francis Editors

This is a useful website offering advice and guidance on how UK authors can be compliant with HEFCE’s open access policy:

http://editorresources.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/research-and-the-ref/

http://editorresources.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/category/citations-and-impact/

 

  1. UK Parliament

Research impact at the UK Parliament

This website provides you with everything you need to know to engage with Parliament as a researcher:

http://www.parliament.uk/research-impact?mc_cid=23e455bd5d&mc_eid=1648a9ffa9

It offers advice on:

What interests Parliament?

Why should you engage with Parliament?

How Parliament uses research

Ways to engage with Parliament

It also provides a number of ‘How To’ guides:

http://www.parliament.uk/get-involved/education-programmes/universities-programme/research-impact-at-the-uk-parliament/how-to-guides/

 

  1. Vertigo Ventures

Vertigo Ventures was founded to measure impact and works closely with clients to deliver high quality impact reporting, which provides clear and actionable insight into how individuals and organisations can maximise the reach and significance of their impact.

Vertigo Ventures provides a range of proprietary services, such as training workshops, consultancy services and the VV-Impact Tracker, all of which utilise an innovative online reporting framework known as VV-Impact Metrics.

The VV Hub can be accessed at: http://www.vertigoventures.com/impacthub/

Sign up for free webinars, newsletters and blogs relating to impact.

 

  1. Research To Action

Research to Action is a global guide to research impact. It offers reading lists, opportunities to blog as well as a number of ‘how to’ guides around key communication and engagement activities to help widen the dissemination of your research.

The website is found at: www.researchtoaction.org

A useful Rethinking Research Partnerships toolkit and discussion guide is found on the website and can be downloaded here: Research to Action Toolkit and Discussion Guide.pdf

 

  1. National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE)

NCCPE’s definition of public engagement in the context of REF:

‘Public engagement’ (in the context of the REF) describes an approach to involving the public in meaningful roles in the development, uptake and/or application of research. The act of engaging the public with research does not count as impact. Impact is what happens when people interact with the research, take it up, react or respond to it. Public engagement doesn’t just happen when the research is complete. It can (and often does) take place before and during the research – for instance, helping to shape its focus and direction and its relevance to potential users.

The website is found at: https://www.publicengagement.ac.uk/

 

 

Why not take this opportunity to check out the impact resources available on the REF staff intranet: https://www.salford.ac.uk/ref

 


Health Sciences Research Centre Programme

Festival of Research Logo

Health Sciences Research Centre Programme

How to find us: Please follow this link to find us at media city: http://www.salford.ac.uk/mediacityuk/location

Tuesday 3rd July

Virtual Reality: Virtual Reality and Mental Health (03/07/18, 09:30-10:30, Media City 2.03)

While offering great potential in mental health, Virtual Reality (VR) is a powerful tool that could be counterproductive if used bluntly. This talk looks at the incentives and hurdles to take up and use of VR with vulnerable populations. It is given by someone who has developed and studied the use of VR for over two decades. VR can provide tailored, controllable and repeatable stimuli to which people react as if it were real, even when knowing it’s not. This capability has application across understanding, diagnosing, treating and living with a range of mental and psychological problems. For example, within therapy it has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of both phobias and PTSD and is being used as an aid to reminisce in dementia. Yet using a technology that blurs boundary between what is real and what is not, should not be used carelessly with those whose condition also blurs this boundary. The talk describes our investigation of how VR exposure therapy works with the mind and fits within the way health professional work with the vulnerable. It concludes with a description of how this understanding has helped to develop a novel VR exposure therapy used within the NHS to treat some of the victims of the Manchester Arena attack.

Biomedical Engineering: Rehabilitation Technologies and Biomedical Engineering Research @ Salford (03/07/18, 10:30-11:30, Media City 2.03)

Rehabilitation Technologies and Biomedical Engineering is a thriving, cross-school research group, jointly led by Professors David Howard (Computing, Science and Engineering) and Laurence Kenney (Health Sciences). We focus on the design and development of new rehabilitation technologies aimed at assisting functional movement, together with novel methods for their evaluation.  Our current research is supported by ~£1.9 million in external grants from NIHR, EPSRC and charities. We will demonstrate some of our latest research, which includes:

  • Controlled energy storage and return in prosthetic limbs to improve amputee gait.
  • A novel and rigorous approach to assessing stability of people using walking aids.
  • A flexible and easy to setup controller for upper limb functional electrical stimulation (FES).
  • Novel approaches to understanding user-assistive device interaction (with psychologists Galpin, Gowen and Bowen)
  • Award winning research on monitoring assistive device use outside of the clinic.

Foot and Ankle: Foot health and industry – from our lab to your feet (03/07/18, 11:30-12:00, Media City 2.03)

Healthy feet are central to keeping mobile and poor foot health can lead to very significant loss of independence. Caring for poorly feet can be expensive too: 1% of the entire NHS budget goes on care of feet affected by diabetes. Without knowing it we make foot health choices each and every day, when we choose our socks and footwear, and then go about our daily activities. Common but often significant foot problems can be adequately managed with the need for a health professional, but equally the input of professionals and can life saving in some cases – literally. Our research has sought to connect what we know about foot health, foot biomechanics and foot disease to the design, development and use of footwear and insoles, and over the counter foot health treatments too. Working with leading global foot health brands, UK footwear manufacturers, and supporting the design of footwear for children and use in unique workplaces, we aim to help everyone make better foot health choices each day.

Occupational Therapy: Occupational Therapy at Salford – How we are contributing to the evidence base (03/07/18, 13:00-14:00, Media City 2.03)

Occupational therapy facilitates health and well-being through the therapeutic use of meaningful and purposeful activities. We believe that occupational balance and justice enables individuals of all ages to achieve their full potential in their everyday lives and communities. A high proportion of our research has an emphasis on improving health and well-being in later life, for example, managing widowhood and care-giving, safe moving, handling and positioning to increase independence and functional performance in activities of daily living. As an emerging group we are involved in a range of projects within the School of Health Sciences, across the University and with partners in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

This session will provide an overview of our research topics including innovations in moving and handling training (research informed teaching), development of the new Tissue Viability Seating Guidelines and the The Home Modification Process Protocol, Service user engagement in occupational therapy and exploring the roles of fathers who have an adult with a learning disability. Practical demonstrations of pressure mapping systems used in a number of studies exploring the impact of different seating and bed surfaces on pressure ulcer development risk and comfort are available.

Equity, Health and Well-being: Putting communities in charge of alcohol: a health champion model (03/07/18, 14:00-15:00, Media City 2.03)

The session will start with a brief overview of the research of the Equity, Health and Wellbeing research group. An interactive discussion will follow, which will look at issues around developing community capacity to influence health behavioural change. It will outline how an asset based community development (ABCD) approach to improving health outcomes is being implemented across Greater Manchester and how it is being evaluated. It will explore the barriers and facilitators to implementing an ABCD approach to improving health outcomes. Experienced researchers will discuss current work underway. They will show some short films that have been made of the experience of professionals and volunteers developing knowledge and skills as alcohol health champions and the benefits experienced to date. The researchers will canvas the views and opinions of those attending the event, about the role of stakeholders, laypeople and community organisations in championing healthy lifestyle changes.

Clinical Rehabilitation: Development of an online self-management platform for people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal conditions (mskhub.com) (03/07/18, 15:00-16:00, Media City 2.03)

Patient information and education have been shown to improve pain and self-efficacy and increase overall quality of life in people with chronic musculoskeletal conditions (MSCs). Informed patients are better able to distinguish and manage symptoms, use treatments effectively, access services needed, manage work and cope better with the psychological impact of their conditions. However, there is a need to improve the access to high quality specialist health information for people with rheumatic and MSCs. This presentation by Dr Yeliz Prior will provide an insight into the development and testing of an online self-management platform, the MSKHUB.com for people with rheumatic and MSCs. This platform aims to facilitate access to (i) valid and reliable health information (ii) evidence-based Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) (iii) advice on self-help, assistive technologies and rehabilitation and (iv) peer support, and will be freely accessible for people with rheumatic and MSCs.

Wednesday 4th July

Knee Biomechanics: Using clinical biomechanics in knee injury and disease (04/07/18, 09:30-10:30, Media City 2.03)

Objective data collection is important in determining where an individual’s functional impairments lie in musculoskeletal research. This can be either in terms of the risk of injury, rehabilitation from injury or in the treatment of degenerative disease. The talk will give an overview of the knee biomechanics and injury research programme at the University where we are investigating risk factors for injury, risk mitigation programs and also rehabilitation approaches (therapeutic and also assistive devices) in the management of musculoskeletal and degenerative disorders. Utilising clinical biomechanics where we collect movement and loading data on individuals helps us to determine which tasks, strategies and treatments are best suited to the individual.

Virtual Reality: Virtual Reality and Mental Health (04/07/18, 10:30-11:30, Media City 2.03)

While offering great potential in mental health, Virtual Reality (VR) is a powerful tool that could be counterproductive if used bluntly. This talk looks at the incentives and hurdles to take up and use of VR with vulnerable populations. It is given by someone who has developed and studied the use of VR for over two decades. VR can provide tailored, controllable and repeatable stimuli to which people react as if it were real, even when knowing it’s not. This capability has application across understanding, diagnosing, treating and living with a range of mental and psychological problems. For example, within therapy it has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of both phobias and PTSD and is being used as an aid to reminisce in dementia. Yet using a technology that blurs boundary between what is real and what is not, should not be used carelessly with those whose condition also blurs this boundary. The talk describes our investigation of how VR exposure therapy works with the mind and fits within the way health professional work with the vulnerable. It concludes with a description of how this understanding has helped to develop a novel VR exposure therapy used within the NHS to treat some of the victims of the Manchester Arena attack.

PGR Director for Health Sciences: Director and student presentations (04/07/18, 11:30-12:30, Media City 2.03)

Occupational Therapy: Occupational Therapy at Salford – How we are contributing to the evidence base (04/07/18, 13:00-14:00, Media City 2.03)

Occupational therapy facilitates health and well-being through the therapeutic use of meaningful and purposeful activities. We believe that occupational balance and justice enables individuals of all ages to achieve their full potential in their everyday lives and communities. A high proportion of our research has an emphasis on improving health and well-being in later life, for example, managing widowhood and care-giving, safe moving, handling and positioning to increase independence and functional performance in activities of daily living. As an emerging group we are involved in a range of projects within the School of Health Sciences, across the University and with partners in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

This session will provide an overview of our research topics including innovations in moving and handling training (research informed teaching), development of the new Tissue Viability Seating Guidelines and the The Home Modification Process Protocol, Service user engagement in occupational therapy and exploring the roles of fathers who have an adult with a learning disability. Practical demonstrations of pressure mapping systems used in a number of studies exploring the impact of different seating and bed surfaces on pressure ulcer development risk and comfort are available.

ICZ Director Talks: Caitriona O’shea, ICZ Sport Director (04/07/18, 14:00-15:00, Media City 2.03)

Diagnostic Imaging: How can medical imaging research benefit patients? (04/07/18, 15:00-16:00, Media City 2.03)

Medical imaging examinations, X-rays and CT scans, involve the use of radiation.  The use of radiation carries with it well known risks but these are necessary in order to diagnose illness and disease.  The amount of radiation used during a medical imaging examination must be balanced against the need to produce images of sufficient diagnostic quality.  Balancing radiation dose and image quality can be a difficult task and is affected by the type of imaging technology, disease under investigation and the size or characteristics of the patient.  Within the Directorate of Radiography at the University of Salford, we have a well-established portfolio of research which seeks to improve the diagnosis of disease whilst minimising any associated risks.  Our research portfolio focuses specifically into the areas of conventional radiography, CT scanning and digital mammography.  Our research group has published in leading international journals and we have a number of Masters and Doctoral students undertaking projects within these areas.

Thursday 5th July

Psychology: Applications of psychology to real world, contemporary issues (05/07/18, 09:30-10:30, Media City 2.03)

The Psychology team at the University of Salford has a diverse range of interests and expertise. Our focus is applying psychology to real-world problems in order to maximise performance and wellbeing. The research we conduct is often multi-disciplinary and many members of the team have experience of working with non-academic partners. This session will provide an overview of our research topics and strengths within the areas of Applied Social Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology, and Health. We will also provide a demonstration of how we are using research techniques such as eye tracking to explore issues within health, education, and the media.

Equity, Health and Well-being: Putting communities in charge of alcohol: a health champion model (05/07/18, 10:30-11:30, Media City 2.03)

The session will start with a brief overview of the research of the Equity, Health and Wellbeing research group. An interactive discussion will follow, which will look at issues around developing community capacity to influence health behavioural change. It will outline how an asset based community development (ABCD) approach to improving health outcomes is being implemented across Greater Manchester and how it is being evaluated. It will explore the barriers and facilitators to implementing an ABCD approach to improving health outcomes. Experienced researchers will discuss current work underway. They will show some short films that have been made of the experience of professionals and volunteers developing knowledge and skills as alcohol health champions and the benefits experienced to date. The researchers will canvas the views and opinions of those attending the event, about the role of stakeholders, laypeople and community organisations in championing healthy lifestyle changes.

Diagnostic Imaging: How can medical imaging research benefit patients? (05/07/18, 13:00-14:00, Media City 2.03)

Medical imaging examinations, X-rays and CT scans, involve the use of radiation.  The use of radiation carries with it well known risks but these are necessary in order to diagnose illness and disease.  The amount of radiation used during a medical imaging examination must be balanced against the need to produce images of sufficient diagnostic quality.  Balancing radiation dose and image quality can be a difficult task and is affected by the type of imaging technology, disease under investigation and the size or characteristics of the patient.  Within the Directorate of Radiography at the University of Salford, we have a well-established portfolio of research which seeks to improve the diagnosis of disease whilst minimising any associated risks.  Our research portfolio focuses specifically into the areas of conventional radiography, CT scanning and digital mammography.  Our research group has published in leading international journals and we have a number of Masters and Doctoral students undertaking projects within these areas.

ICZ Director Talks: Andrew Spencer, ICZ Health, Wellbeing & Society Director (05/07/18, 14:00-15:00, Media City 2.03)

SPARC Parallel Session Talks 3.4 (05/07/18, 14:30-15:30, Media City 2.03)

Psychology: Applications of psychology to real world, contemporary issues (05/07/18, 15:00-16:00, Media City 2.03)

The Psychology team at the University of Salford has a diverse range of interests and expertise. Our focus is applying psychology to real-world problems in order to maximise performance and wellbeing. The research we conduct is often multi-disciplinary and many members of the team have experience of working with non-academic partners. This session will provide an overview of our research topics and strengths within the areas of Applied Social Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology, and Health. We will also provide a demonstration of how we are using research techniques such as eye tracking to explore issues within health, education, and the media.


Impact at the Festival of Research

Salford is holding its inaugural Festival of Research this year between 25th June and 20th July 2018 across the campus.

The aim of the Festival is to showcase and celebrate Salford’s diverse research and its impact to a wider audience and will encourage both researchers and the general public to become involved.

In the week of 2nd-6th July there will be a concentration of physical events and conferences taking place, including the Salford Postgraduate Annual Researcher Conference (SPARC), which is a two-day PGR-focused showcase event.

Running alongside the Festival will be ‘Storytelling at Salford’: this is a larger project which forms part of the research training strategy and which is also linked to the University’s new research strategy. It involves the Salford Research community (PGRs, Academics and Leaders) recording short videos about what they do at Salford. The first 20 videos will be showcased as part of the festival and during the festival we will encourage more to participate and create videos themselves.

 

 

Targeted Impact Events

As part of the Festival we will be running a number of specifically impact-related events to help inspire our researchers to think more closely about the impact of their research and how they can best improve its significance and reach in the future.

 

Highlights include:

Wednesday, 27 June 2018: Fast Track Impact case study writing workshop with Prof Mark Reed

Mark will focus specifically on the REF and what makes a good impact case study, how to improve your writing around impact, as well as evidence collection tips. This workshop will also include detailed external peer review of 4 draft impact case studies, with recommendations of how these can be enhanced and improved.

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597642/staff-development-fast-track-t

 

Thursday, 28 June 2018: Developing Your Narrative Sessions with Chris Simms, Royal Literary Fund

Chris is holding individual 40-minute mentoring sessions for researchers looking to develop their narrative and storywriting skills, whether it be for the purpose of formulating impact case studies, writing funding bids, making applications for research festivals or similar.

All enquiries: research-impact@salford.ac.uk

 

Tuesday, 3 July 2018: Impact Case Study Writing Retreat (MCUK)

Space will be made available to each School to spend dedicated time working on existing or potential impact case study drafts. Impact Coordinators will be on hand to provide advice and guidance and researchers will be able to access resources from the REF intranet site and use the Figshare data repository to gather impact evidence.

To book:

AM: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/604998/festival-of-research-impact-ca

PM: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/605001/festival-of-research-impact-ca

 

Wednesday, 11 July 2018: Developing Your Narrative Sessions with Chris Simms, Royal Literary Fund

Chris is holding individual 40-minute mentoring sessions for researchers looking to develop their narrative and storywriting skills, whether it be for the purpose of formulating impact case studies, writing funding bids, making applications for research festivals or similar.

All enquiries: research-impact@salford.ac.uk

 

Why not take this opportunity to check out the Festival of Research website to find events of interest to you: https://www.salford.ac.uk/researchfest

Join the conversation:

#salfordresearchfest         @Festivalofrese1

 


Peer Review of Impact Case Studies

According to Fast Track Impact’s calculations (see: http://www.fasttrackimpact.com/single-post/2017/02/01/How-much-was-an-impact-case-study-worth-in-the-UK-Research-Excellence-Framework for further details), the best impact submissions to REF2014, i.e. those achieving a 4* star narrative case study, had a currency exchange of some £324,000 (£46,300 per year between 2015/16-2021/22). By contrast, a 4* research output was typically valued at between £5,000-£25,000. Generally speaking, impact case studies are thought to be worth around 5 times more than outputs at higher full-time equivalents (FTEs).

As such, the huge potential value this may bring to institutions cannot be underestimated, particularly given the increased weighting of impact from 20% to 25% for the next REF exercise in 2021. Consequently, institutions employ a number of strategies and resources to ensure the best possible outcomes of their REF impact submissions. For example, there are reports of significant sums being spent by some universities in the REF2014 exercise on copy editors or science writers in order to create compelling narratives that would stand up to the scrutiny of the REF panel members.

A robust internal and external peer review process is one means of tracking progress over time in order to enhance and improve narratives and impact evidence ahead of the final REF submission in 2020.

 

Upcoming peer review events

The University of Salford is undertaking its first external peer review of draft impact case studies this Summer as part of its REF Readiness exercise. This will give the University a snapshot of where things stand and where improvements still need to made in the 2 years leading up to the REF submission. The feedback from the external peer review will inform the planned internal peer review due to take place in early 2019.

 

Dates for the diary include:

Monday, 18 June 2018 – Friday, 29 June 2018: External peer review of 10 x impact case studies across UoAs      This will include review and annotation of draft case studies, an overview report, notes on potential grades and advice on how to enhance impact.

Monday, 25 June 2018 – Friday, 20 July 2018: University of Salford Festival of Research       A month-long programme of events celebrating and promoting the University’s valuable research. This will include a REF-focused impact case study writing workshop, an impact ‘writing retreat’ and one-to-one mentoring on impact narratives.

Wednesday, 27 June 2018: Fast Track Impact case study writing workshop with Prof Mark Reed           Mark will focus specifically on the REF and what makes a good impact case study, how to improve your writing around impact, as well as evidence collection tips. This workshop will also include detailed external peer review of 4 draft impact case studies, with recommendations of how these can be enhanced and improved.

 

To book: https://myadvantage.salford.ac.uk/students/events/Detail/597642/staff-development-fast-track-t

 

Why not take this opportunity to look at the upcoming peer review meetings and events information on our REF Intranet site at: https://teamsite.salford.ac.uk/sites/sc02/REF2021/SitePages/Training.aspx